CLAN CAMERON  REFERENCE  GUIDE

 

Discover the original residence of your Camerons ancestors in the Scottish Highlands.
Find the connection from your surname to the Cameron Clan of yesteryear.         
Delve into the history and battles of the Cameron men.
Learn more of your proud heritage.

                           

This Web-based reference guide, in creation since 1995, is an ongoing work.  Clan Cameron Online is pleased to offer it for your research and general usage.  These resources may also be used to complement a trip to "Cameron Country," scenic Lochaber in the Scottish Highlands - leave the tourist trails and discover the hidden significance of these lands.  As always, any additions or corrections are appreciated, and may be directed to us for consideration. 

 

 

[A-B]  [C-D]  [E-F]  [G-H]  [I-J]  [K-L]

[M-N]  [O-P]  [Q-R]  [S-T]  [U-V]  [W-X]  [Y-Z]

 

 

 

A-B

 

 

ABERNETHY PARISH:

A former civil and ecclesiastically unified parish (Abernethy and Kincardine – abolished in 1975) in Clan Grant territory.  Located south of the Firth of Tay’s head, a considerable distance southeast of Lochaber.  Home to a sizable population of Camerons, legended to have been descended from 12 young Camerons who escorted a lady of the House of Lochiel to marry a Stewart of Kincardine in the mid-1500s.  It has been suggested that one of these men might have been Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron, and the men were his followers.  Similar to the history of the Camerons of Hilton.

 

ABHAINN AIRCEIG:

(see: Arkaig - River)

 

ABHAIN AONACHAIN:

(see: Spean - River)

 

ABHAINN BHEAG:

“Little River.”  Runs from near Glengour down into the River Kiachnish, north of Blarmachfoldach.

 

ABHAINN BHEAGAIG / ALLT BHEAGAIG:

“River of the Little One.”  Located just west of Fassifern.  Runs down from near Druim Beag into Loch Eil near Corrybeg.  

 

ABHAINN CAIG / ABHAINN CAI-AIG:

(see: Caig - River)

 

ABHAINN CHIABHAIG:

(see: Caig - River)

 

ABHAINN CHINGIDH:

(see: Kingie - River)

 

ABHAINN CIA’AIG:

(see: Caig - River)

 

ABHAINN CHONGHLEANN:

(see: Cona - River)

 

ABHAINN DEAS-AIRIGH:

(see: Dessary – River)

 

ABHAINN DUIBHAILIGH:

(see: Dubh Lighe – River)

 

ABHAINN FIONNAILIGH / ABHAINN FIONN LIGHE:

(see: Fionn Lighe – River)

 

ABHAINN GHARBHAIN:

(see: Garvan – River)

 

ABHAINN GHLAOIDH:

(see: Gloy – River)

 

ABHAINN LOCHAIDH:

(see: Lochy - River)

 

ABHAINN LUNNDAIDH:

(see: Lundy – River)

 

ABHAINN MHAILIDH:

(see: Mallie – River)

 

ABHAINN NIBHEIS:

(see: Nevis – River)

 

ABHAINN PHEIGHINN:

(see: Pean – River)

 

ABHAINN RATH / ABHAINN REIDH / ALLT REIDH:

“Smooth Flowing River.”  Runs west into the head of Loch Treig.

 

ABHAINN REIDH:

(see: Abhainn Rath)

 

ABHAINN RIGHE:

(see: Ree – River)

 

ABHAINN RUAIDH:

(see: Roy – River)

 

ABHAINN SGARBHDAIL:

(see: Scaddle – River)

 

ABHAINN SPIATHAIN:

(see: Spean – River)

 

ABHAINN SUILEIG:

(see: Suileag – River)

 

ACHACHERA:

(see: Achnaherry)

 

ACHADERRY / AUCHADERRY / ACHADH AN DOIRE:

“Field of the Oak Grove.”  Located just northeast of Roybridge, near the foot of Glen Roy.

 

ACHADH A’ BHEARRAIDH:

(see: Auchavarie)

 

ACHADH A’ CHATHA:

(see: Achan a’ Chath)

 

ACHADH A’ MHADAIDH:

(see: Achavady)

 

ACHADH  AN AODAINN:

(see: Achenadain)

 

ACHADH AN DOIRE:

(see: Achaderry)

 

ACHADH AN EICH:

(see: Achaneich)

 

ACHADH AN TODHAIR:

(see: Achintore)

 

ACHADH AN T-SITHIDH:

(see: Achintee)

 

ACHADH A’ PHUBUILL:

(see: Achaphubul)

 

ACHADH LAGAIN:

(see: Claggan)

 

ACHADH LUACHRACH:

(see: Achluachrach)

 

ACHADH NA CARAIDH / ACHADH NA CORAIDH:

(see: Achnacarry)

 

ACHADH NA DALACH:

(see: Achandaul)

 

ACHADH NA (F)RASCHOILLE:

(see: Achnafraschoille)

 

ACHADH NA H-ANNAIDE:

(see: Auchnahanate)

 

ACHADH NA H-EIRGHE:

(see: Achnaherry)

 

ACHADH NAM BO BAN:

(see: Auchnabobanne)

 

ACHADH NAN CON:

(see: Achnacon)

 

ACHADH NAN COTHAICHEAN:

(see: Achnacochine)

 

ACHADH NAN CRO:

A possible early name for Achnacarry, put forth by one author.  It would translate to “Field of the Cattle Folds” and would be in reference to stocks of cattle (allegedly liberated from other clans) kept in the area.  This theory is speculatory and has not been proven to any degree.

(see: Achnacarry)

 

ACHADH NAN SABHAL:

(see: Achnasaul)

 

ACHADH RIABHACH:

(see: Achariach)

 

A' CHAILLEACH:

(see: Caillich)

 

ACHAN A' CHATH:

“Little Field of the Fight” or “Field of the Fight.”  On the upper reaches of the Ash Burn (Allt Nan Dathadairean), near the head of the Lundavra Road.  Mooreland on which some Campbells made a final stand when fleeing from the Battle of Inverlochy, in 1645.

(also see: Tom Na Bratach)

 

ACHANDAUL / AUCHANDAUL / AUCHANDAULL / AUCHNADALL / ACHADH NA DALACH:

“Field of the Meeting.”  A small homestead located south of Cruim Leacainn, along Allt Achadh na Dalach.  Roughly between Torlundy and Spean Bridge, north of the A82.  Tom na Brataiche is located nearby.  MacSorlie-Camerons settled in this location, before the 18th century.

 

ACHANDAUL BURN:

(see: Allt Achadh na Dalach)

 

ACHANEICH / ACHADH AN EICH:

“The Horse Field.”  Located in Glen Pean.

 

ACH' AN TODHAIR:

(see: Achintore)

 

A’ CHAOIR:

(see: Cour, The)

 

ACHAPHUBUL / ACHAFUBIL / ACHAPHUBIL / ACHAPHUBUIL / ACHADH A’ PHUBUILL:

“Field of the Booth or Tent.”  An old hamlet located just northwest of Camusnagaul, opposite from Corpach, between Loch Linnhe and Loch Eil; on the south shore of the Narrows.

 

ACHARACLE / AHARKILL:

A small village located near Ardnamurchan, on the shore of Loch Sheil.  Known as Aharkill in the 19th century.

 

ACHARIACH / ACHADH RIABHACH:

“Brindled Field.”  Formerly a small settlement in central Glen Nevis, which featured a number of dwellings and a school.  Approximately five miles southeast of Fort William.  Home to the Acharaich Forest Walk along Allt Choire Dheirg (with outstanding views of Ben Nevis). 

(also see: Carn Dearg)

 

ACHAVADY / ACHADH A’ MHADAIDH:

“Field of the Wolf.”  Located approximately two miles beyond Bohuntine, in the Braes of Lochaber.  Tradition states that a woman killed a wolf in this location. 

 

ACHAVARIE:

(see: Auchavarie)

 

ACHDALIEU / ACHADALEW / ACHDALOE / ACHADALIUIE / ACHADH DA-LIUBHA:

“Thy Liubha's Field.”  Located approximately two and one-half miles west of Corpach and three miles west of Inverlochy, on the north shore of Loch Eil.  A substantial mansion was built here as a hunting/shooting lodge in 1875 by Lochiel and was occupied by shooting tenants until 1952, when it became a hotel.  A decade or so later it became the “Loch Eil Centre - Toc H,” later “Outward Bound Loch Eil.”  Upon the Estate of Lochiel from the 17th century, with Cummings tenants. 

 

On the ground between Loch Eil and the site of the present Outward Bound School, and between the two burns, one of which flows on the east side of the centre and the other on its west side, was where Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel and his men participated in the Battle of Achdalieu, in 1654.  It was here that Sir Ewen, in desperation, bit out the throat of an English officer in the midst of a heated struggle.

(also see: Allt an Fhuadh)

(also see: Cummings)

 

A’ CHEANN MHOR:

(see: Kenmore)

 

ACHENADAIN / ACHADH AN AODAINN:

“Field of the Face/Slope.”  A former small hamlet located not far from Fort William, along the Lundavra Road.

 

ACHINELLAN / ACHINEILAN:

(see: Achnanellan)

 

ACHINTEE / ACHADH AN T-SITHIDH / ACHADH AN T-SUIDHE:

“Field of the Stormy Blast” or “Field of the Seat.”  A small village southeast of Fort William, near the River Nevis.  Where the tourist trail to Ben Nevis begins.

 

ACHINTORE / AUCHINTORE / AUCHINTOR-BEG / ACHADH AN TODHAIR:

“Field of the Bleaching.”  Village or old township upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.  Part of present-day Fort William, near the old fort, just south of the pierhead, up the hillside from the shore of Loch Linhhe.  In numerous documents from the distant past the area now known as Fort William was known as Achintore.  In generations past cloth was dyed near here, at the “Ash or Dyer’s Burn.”    

Battle of Achintore, circa 1654.

(also see: Upper Achintore)

(also see: Lower Achintore)

 

ACHLUACHRACH / ACHADH LUACHRACH:

“Place of the Rushes” or “Field Full of Rushes.”  A village on the River Spean, in the Braes of Lochaber, east of Roybridge.

 

ACHNABOBANE:

(see: Auchnabobanne)

 

ACHNACARRY / ACHNACARIE / ACHADH NA CORAIDH / ACHADH NA CARAIDH):

“Field of the Weir/Fish-Trap” (which was commonplace in this location, to keep fish well stocked in Loch Arkaig).  Home of the Chiefs of Clan Cameron.  Located in the shadow of Beinn Bhan, which rises to the south, on the isthmus between Loch Lochy and Loch Arkaig, where Arkaig's waters run out into the south end of Lochy.  Originally “a large house, all built of fir-planks, the handsomest of that kind in Britain,” built circa 1655/1665.  Set fire to by 320 men of Bligh's Regiment, under the command of Lt. Colonel Edward Cornwallis and a “body” of Munros, under the command of Munro of Culcairn, on May 28, 1746.

 

Between 1802 and 1837 the mansion house or castle of Achnacarry was rebuilt, under Donald Cameron, 22nd Chief of the Clan, after a design by Mr. Gillespie, a distinguished architect.  Beginning in 1942, in the midst of World War Two, it was loaned for use as “Castle Commando,” the training site for approximately 25,000 commando/ranger soldiers.  Home to Lochiel, the Clan Cameron Museum, Cameron Cairn and Cameron Clansmen’s Oak Grove.

(see: www.achnacarry.com)

(also see: Achadh nan Cro)

 

ACHNACOCHINE / ACHNACOICHINE/ ACHADH NAN COTHAICHEAN:

“Field of the Disputants.”  This location was once a favored rendezvous place for cattle reivers, while on their way to foras in either Perthshire or Strathspey.  Located southeast of Achluachrach, in the Braes of Lochaber.

 

ACHNACON / ACHADH NAN CON:

“Field of the Dogs.”  Located in Glen Nevis, on the north bank of the Nevis River.  Thought to be the original burial place for the Camerons of Glennevis.  Local legend states that the ancient Pictish kings used to keep their celebrated deer-hounds here, training them for the chase.

(also see: Tom-eas-an-t'slinnean)

 

ACHNAFRASCHOILLE / ACHADH NA (F)RASCHOILLE:

“Field of the Shrubbery.”  Located in Glen Spean, just south of Corrychoille.

 

ACHNAHANNET:

(see: Auchnahanate)

 

ACHNAHERRY / AUCHNAHERRY / ACHADH NA H-EIRGHE / ACHADH NA H-EIRBHE / ACHACHERA:

“Field of the Boundary Between Two Marches” or “Field of the Hind.”  A former township (which has been a collection of ruins since at least 1875) close to the RiverLoy, in Glen Loy, at the southwest base of Beinnn Bhan.  Between Barr and Achnanellan.  Eight families, mostly of MacGillonie “stock” lived here in 1750.

 

Cameron of Fassifern built a handful of homes here in 1747.  They had primarily as tenants Camerons, Vick Phoul (MacPhail?), McVicar and Kians (MacNeill?).

 

ACHNANELLAN / ACHINELLAN / ACHINEILAN / ACHADH AN FHEALLAIN:

“Field of the Fellon.”  Located near the head of Glen Loy, southwest of Am Mam.  A member of the Camerons (MacGillonies of Strone) rented this land, after 1670.   Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacMillans as tenants.

 

ACHNASAUL / ACHNASOUL / ACHNASSUL / ACHADH NAN SABHAL:

“The Place of the Barn” or “The Field of the Barns/Graneries.” A portion of land covered with healthy pasture, dwelling house and farm steading (in 1875) and formerly a small settlement, located approximately one mile beyond the foot of Loch Arkaig, on its north shore, just north-west of Achnacarry.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacPhees as tenants.  When surveyed in 1772 Achnasaul consisted of stone houses near the burn side, with “indifferent pasture.”  The gravelly soil was fertilized by tathing (confining livestock to manure the land) and laying fern fronds.  It was then used to sow oats and corn.  The Allt Dubh used to overflow its banks routinely, flooding some of the famr land here.  A burial ground used to be located near the junction of the Allt Dubh and Loch Arkaig, and was still in used in the late eighteenth century.

(also see: Coille Achadh nan Sabhal)

 

ACHNASHELLACH (THE BATTLE OF):

1505.

 

A' CHORPAICH:

(see: Corpach)

 

A’ CHUIL:

(see: Cuil)

 

A’ CREAG LIATH:

“The Grey Crag” or “The Grey Rock.”  A small rock located on the north shore of Loch Arkaig, between Murlaggan and Caillich.

 

A’ GHLAC FHEARNA:

(see: Clackfern)

 

AHARKILL:

(see: Acharacle)

 

AIRD EACHAIDH:

(see: Ardachvie)

 

AIRD NOIS / ARD NOIS:

“Excellent Promontory” or “Height of Excellence.”  A circular knoll “of no great elevation or extent” located along the southern shore of Loch Arkaig, in western Guisach (The Pine Forest).

 

AIRD-RUAIDH:

(see: Erracht)

 

AIRIGH SHUARLAIN:

(see: Aryhoulan)

 

ALLAN OF THE FORAYS / ALLAN NAN CREACH:

Allan MacDonald Dubh Cameron, XII Chief of Clan Cameron.  Remembered for his bravery in battle and for his 32 expeditions into his enemy's country for the 32 years that he lived and three more, “for the three-fourths of a year that he was in his mother's womb.”  In the end his good fortune came to an end, when he was killed during a raid upon Macintosh lands.  There is a stone on the hill above Blarour which is known as “Allan's Stone” which is said to mark the spot where he was buried, circa 1480.

 

ALLAN'S STONE:

A stone on the hill above Blarour which is said to mark the spot where Allan MacDonald Dubh Cameron, XII Chief of Clan Cameron (Allan of the Forays) was buried, after being killed in action during a raid against the Macintoshes, circa 1480.

 

ALLT A’ BHARRAICH:

“Burn of the Birch.”  A small stream rising on the southeast side of Tom a’ Bharraich and falling into the River Loy approximately one mile below Inverskilavulin.

 

ALLT A' BHRADAIN:

 

“The Salmon Burn.”  A small burn or stream rising in the wood east of Caochan Mhineagair and flowing east before falling into Loch Lochy, just south of Rudha Allt a’ Bhradain.

 

ALLT A’ BHUDHAIGIRE:

“Burn of the Coulterneb / Puffin.”  Located in Fort William, somewhat near Cow Hill. 

 

ALLT ACHADH NA DALACH / ALLT ABHADH NA DALACH / ACHANDAUL BURN / AUCHANDAULL BURN:

“Field of the Meeting Burn.”  A long, winding stream that begins near the Leanachan Forest and winds to the southwest, faling into the River Lundy (just northwest of Inverlochy Castle Hotel).

 

ALLT ACHADH NAN SABHAL:

“Burn of the Field of the Barns.”  A mountain stream, rising from the Braes of Achnasaul and flowing to the south to a junction with Allt Dubh, which in turn empties into Loch Arkaig on its northeastern shore.

 

ALLT A’ CHAM DHOIRE:

“Stream of the Crooked Grove/Thicket.”    A large stream rising in Coire a’ Chaim Shoire and entering the River Mallie west of An t’Seann Fhrith (The Old Forest).

(also see: Cam Dhoire)

(also see: Gleann a’ Cham Dhoire)

 

ALLT A' CHAORAINN / ALLT A’ CHAORUINN:

“Stream of the Rowan Trees.”  A “considerable stream” that extends from the northern slope of Streap through Gleann a’ Chaoruinn to the River Pean.

 

ALLT A’ CHINN BHRIC:

“Stream of the Speckled Headland.”  Located northwest of Murlaggan and west of Sgurr Mhurlagain.  Generally north of Loch Arkaig’s head.

 

ALLT A’ CHLAMHAIN:

“The Hawk’s Stream.”  A mountain stream that rises on the north side of Meall Breac and flows into the River Caig.  North of the Dark Mile. 

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE BHRIC MHOIR:

“Stream of the Large Speckled Corrie.”  Located south of Beinn Bhreac.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE DHEIRG:

(see: Allt Coire Dheirg)

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE DHUIBH:

“Stream of the Dark Corrie” or “Burn of the Black Hollow.”  Runs from near Coire Dubh into the Fintaig Water, which in turn runs into the River Gloy.  Also a stream that runs into the River Mallie, near Invermallie and a stream that rises in Coire Dubh a’ Ghiubhais that falls into Loch Arkaig.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE DHUIBH:

“Stream of the Dark Corrie” or “Burn of the Black Hollow.”  A stream rising in Coire Duibh that flows northwest until joining the River Mallie near Invermallie.  Also a stream that runs into the Fintaig Water, which in turn runs into the River Gloy and a stream that rises in Coire Dubh a’ Ghiubhais that falls into Loch Arkaig.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE DHUIBH:

“Stream of the Dark Corrie” or “Burn of the Black Hollow.”  A small stream rising in Coire Dubh a’ Ghiubhais that flows north until falling into Loch Arkaig.  Also a stream that runs into the Fintaig Water, which in turn runs into the River Gloy and a stream that runs into the River Mallie, near Invermallie.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE GHLAS / ALLT A’ CHOIRE GHLAIS:

“Burn of the Grey Hollow.”  A small stream rising in Corrie Glas and flowing north, falling into the south shore of Loch Arkaig east of Eilean a’ Ghuibhais.  Also a stream located north of Glen Kingie.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE GHLAS / ALLT A’ CHOIRE GHLAIS:

“Burn of the Grey Hollow.”  Located north of Glen Kingie.  Also a stream flowing into Loch Arkaig on its south shore, near Eilean a’ Ghuibhais.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE REIDH:

“Stream of the Smooth Corrie.”  Located north of Glen Fionnlighe.  Runs south, becoming confluent with the Fionn Lighe roughly north of Kinlochiel.

 

ALLT A’ CHOIRE RIABHAICH:

“Burn of the Brindled Corrie.”  Located south of Lochan nan Sgud.

 

ALLT A’ CHUIL CHOIRE:

“Stream of the Back Corrie.”  Runs down from just northeast of Aonach Beag into the Killiechonate Forest, before becoming confluent with Allt Coire an Eoin.  

 

ALLT A’ COIRE LEACACH:

“Stream of the Stony Corrie” or “Stream of the Flag Hollow” (translations vary).  A small stream rising in Coire Leacach and flowing into the River Mallie.  South of Loch Arkaig, east of Gaor Bheinn/Gulvain (Upper).  Also a place just south of Meall Dubh. 

 

ALLT A’ COIRE REIDH:

(see: Allt a’ Choire Reidh)

 

ALLT A’ COIRE SCREAMHACH:

“Stream of the Screaming Corrie” or “Stream of the Horrible Hollow.”  A large stream which rises in Coire Screamhach and joins Allt Camgharaidh ½ mile from its junction with Loch Arkaig, on its south shore.

 

ALLT A’ GHATH:

“Stream of the Spear.”  A small stream that rises on the east side of Glen Caig and flows into the River Caig at Allt na Caillich.

 

ALLT AIRD EACHAIDH / ALLT ARD ECHDE:

“Stream of the Horses’ Height” or “Epidion Height Stream.”  Rises on the northeast side Beinn Chraoibh and flows south until entering Loch Arkaig at Ardachie.

 

ALLT A’ MHAIM:

“The Stream of the Sow Hill.”  A mountain stream rising near the center of An Mam and entering the River Mallie.  South of Loch Arkaig.

 

ALLT A’ MHANNAIN:

(see: Allt a’ Mhinnean)

 

ALLT A’ MHINNEAN / ALLT A’ MHANNAIN:

“The Young Kids Burn.”  A small stream located northeast of Clunes that flows south before falling into Clunes Bay and Loch Lochy.

 

ALLT A' MHUILLIN / ALLT A' MHUILINN / ALLT A’ CHOIRE MHUILINN:

“Burn of the Mill” or “Burn of the Mill Corrie.”  Connects to Corrie Leis, just south-west of Carn Beag Dearg and runs down to an intersection with Allt Coire an Lochain, east of Lochyside.  Also a burn located in downtown Fort William.

 

ALLT A' MHUILLIN / ALLT A' MHUILINN / ALLT A’ CHOIRE MHUILINN / ALLT DOMHNALL AN T-SIUCAIR / ALLT A’ PHRIOSAON:

“Burn of the Mill,” “Burn of the Mill Corrie” or in generations past “Donald of the Sugar Burn” and “The Prison Burn.”  Located in downtown Fort William, near the (old ?) Police Station.  An old General Wade bridge was built across this burn at one time, but is now concealed.  Also a burn located east of Lochyside.

     

ALLT AN AMAIR:

“The Lade Burn.”  Located southeast of Coruanan.

 

ALLT AN DIOMBAIDH:

“Stream of the Offence.”  Located southeast of Torlundy.

 

ALLT AN FHAING:

“The Stream of the Fold/Fank.”  A small mountain stream flowing north from Coire Gorm into the head of Loch Arkaig, near Tom na Ceanna Mhurach.  Also a stream rising near Meall na Teanga and merging with Allt Glas Dhoire Mor, just prior to entering Loch Lochy on its west shore.

 

ALLT AN FHAING:

“The Stream of the Fold/Fank.”  A small stream rising between Meall Coire Lochan and Meall na Teanga, flowing southeast until merging with Allt Glas Dhoire Mor, just prior to entering Loch Lochy.  Also a stream flowing into the head of Loch Arkaig, near Tom na Ceanna Mhurach.

 

ALLT AN FHASAICH DHUIBH:

“Stream of the Black Desert.”  A small stream rising on the hill just north of Coire Choille-rais and flowing east into Loch Lochy, on its western shore.

 

ALLT AN FHUADH / ALLT AN FHUATHA:

“Burn of the Spectre.”  Stream located near Achdalieu, flowing into Loch Eil.  Possibly the stream in which Sir Ewen Cameron, XVII Chief of Clan Cameron, had his famous singular combat with an English officer during the Battle of Achdalieu, circa 1654.

 

ALLT AN INBHIR:

“Burn of the Confluence.”  Located east of Fassifern, flowing down into Loch Eil at Camas na Inbhir.  Also a place southeast of Loch Eilde Mor.

 

ALLT AN INBHIR:

“Burn of the Confluence.”  Located southeast of Loch Eilde Mor.  Also a place east of Fassifern.

 

ALLT AN LAGAIN:

“Burn of the Little Hollow.”  Located east of Beinn Bhreac.

 

ALLT AN LEOGHAIR:

“Burn of the Hoof” or “Burn of the Prong.”  Located south of Loch Arkaig and south of Gerraran.  A small stream rising on the southwest side of Comhard a Ghearr Choirean Mhor, which falls into Allt Coire Screamhach.

 

ALLT AN LOIN:

“Stream of the Marsh.”  Located near Leanachan.

 

ALLT AN OIR:

“Burn of the Gold.”  Runs down from Aonach Beag’s western face into Allt Coire Guibhsachain, which eventually empties in the Water of Nevis.

 

ALLT AN RUIGHE MHOIR:

“Stream of the Great Sheiling,” “Stream of the Big Herding Place” or “Stream of the Big Hill Slope.”  A small stream rising in Coire an Ruighe Mhoir and/or Coire nam Fuaran that flows south for a short distance before falling into the River Mallie,  west of its junction with Allt a’ Cham Dhoire.

 

ALLT AN T-SEILICH:

“Stream of the Willow Trees.”  A mountain stream rising about 3/8 mile west of Lochan Tri Chrioch.  Flows to the north for approximately ¾ mile before becoming confluent with Allt Coire an t-Lightuinn, just south of Barr.

 

ALLT AN T-SNEACHDA:

“Stream of the Snow.”  Flows down from Aonach Mor to an eventual intersection with the River Lundy.  The Aonach Mor gondola and path both follow the “general line” of Allt an t-Sneachda.

 

ALLT AN TUAIRNEIR:

“The Turner’s Burn.”  An old stream, covered over in more recent years, that flows under High Street in Fort William.

 

ALLT A’ PHRIOSAIN:

(see: Allt a’ Mhuilinn – downtown Fort William citation)

 

ALLT ARCABHI:

A mountain stream flowing from Loch Blair in a southern direction until it joins Loch Arkaig at Arcabhi.

 

ALLT BAN:

‘The White Burn” or “Fair Burn.”  A small stream rising in the hills north of Clunes and flowing south under the Dark Mile, where it turns to the east, passes just north of Clunes and falls into Loch Lochy at Tom an Eireannaich.

 

ALLT BEAG COIRE NAN GEUROIREAN:

“Little Stream of the Hollow of the Sharp Edges.”  A stream rising on the north side of Mullach Coire nan Gearran and flowing northward for a short distance before falling into Loch Arkaig approximately one mile west of Eilean a’ Ghiubhais.

 

ALLT BEALACH AN EASAIN:

“The Stream of the Pass of the Small Waterfall.”  A small stream rising in Bealach an Easain and flowing in a southern course until it joins the River Caig near its confluence with Allt Tarsuinn.  At this place Gleann Tarsuinn ends and Gleann Caig begins.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

ALLT BEINN CHLIANAIG / ALLT BEINN CHLAOINEIG:

“Stream of Beinn Chlianaig.”  Located west of Beinn Chlianaig, running north into the River Spean just east of Bunroy.  

 

ALLT BHEAGAIG:

(see: Abhainn Bheagaig)

 

ALLT BHEITHE:

“Birch Burn.”  Located southeast of Beinn Bhreac

 

ALLT BOIDHEACH:

“Beautiful Burn.”  Located east of Beinn Chlianaig, in the Braes of Lochaber.  Runs into Allt nam Bruach, which eventually drains into the River Spean.

 

ALLT BO LOIN / ALLT BOTH-FHLOINN:

“Boline Stream.”  Flows down into Allt Ionndrainn, due west of Bohuntine, in Glen Roy.  

 

ALLT BRAIGH NAN ALLT:

“Top of the Burns.”  A stream rising on the west side of Creag nan Each and flowing north for a short distance before falling into the River Mallie just over one mile from its confluence with Loch Arkaig.

 

ALLT CAILLICH / ALLT CALLICH:

(see: Allt na Callich)

 

ALLT CAM:

“Crooked Burn.”  Located southeast of The Cour’s intersection with Allt an Loin, south of Corrychoille.

 

ALLT CAM BEALACH:

“The Stream of the Crooked Pass.”  A mountain stream rising at the head of Cam Bealach that flows in a western course and forms the historic Kilmallie / Kilmonivaig parish boundary to its junction with the River Caig.  North of the Clunes Forest.

 

ALLT CAMGHARAIDH / ALLT CAMGARRY:

"Stream of the Crooked Hide-out" or “Rough Winding Burn” (translations vary).  A large stream flowing through Gleann Camgharaidh and falling into Loch Arkaig on its southwest shore, at Bun Camgharaidh.

(see: Gleann Camgharaidh)

 

ALLT CAOCHAN NAN DAMH:

“The Stream of the Stags’ Brook.”  A small stream rising southeast of, and flowing into, Allt Ruighe an Achaidh Bhric.  At a short distance from its source these waters become the body of the aforementioned stream.

 

ALLT CAONICH / ALLT CUINICH / ALLT CHAOINICH:

“Burn of the Mossy Place.”  A rapid mountain stream having its source on the southwest side of Meall a’ Bhlair and flowing into Loch Arkaig at Caonich (Cuinich).

 

ALLT CHAILLICH:

(see: Allt na Callich)

 

ALLT CHAMABHREAC:

“One-Eyed Trout Stream.”  Located south of the head of Loch Treig.

 

ALLT CHAOINICH:

(see: Allt Caonich)

 

ALLT CHAORUINN:

(see: Allt Cuirnean)

 

ALLT CHEANNA MHUIR:

“Stream of the Head of the Loch or Sea.”  A mountain stream rising about one mile southeast of Meall Lochan nan Dubh Lochan and flowing in a southern direction until joining Loch Arkaig near Rudha Cheanna Mhuir,

 

ALLT CHOILLE-RAIS:

A scenic, waterfall laden stream that runs north from near the summit of Aonach Mor down into the Leanachan Forest.

 

ALLT COILLE ROIS:

(see: Allt Coire Choille-rais)

 

ALLT COIR’ AN T-SEARRAICH:

(see: Allt Coire an t-Searraich)

 

ALLT COIRE A’ BHEITHE:

“Corrie of the Birch Burn.”  Located west of Lochan a’ Chomhlain.

 

ALLT COIRE A’ CHAORAINN / ALLT COIRE A’ CHAORUINN:

“Stream of the Corrie of the Rowan Trees.”  A burn rising in Coire a’ Chaorainn/Chaoruinn.  Located south of Loch Arkaig and south of Gaor Bheinn/Gulvain (Upper).  Flows down into the Fionn Lighe.

 

ALLT COIRE A’ CHAORUINN:

“Stream of the Corry of the Rowan Trees.”  A small stream rising in Coire a’ Chaoruinn and flowing northward for approximately one mile until joining the River Kingie.

 

ALLT COIRE A’ MHAIL:

“Corrie of the Rent or Tribute Burn.”  A stream that flows down (north) from the Mamores to the Water of Nevis, falling into that river at An Steall.

 

ALLT COIRE A' MHUSGS AIN / ALLT COIRE NAM MUSGAN:

“Corrie of the Rotten Trees Burn.”  A stream that flows down from Coire Mhusgain into Glen Nevis, joining the River Nevis near the Lower Falls.

 

ALLT COIRE AN EICH:

“The Horse Corrie Stream.”  Located southwest of Glendessery.

 

ALLT COIRE AN EOIN:

“Bird Corrie Stream.”  Runs down from east of Aonach Mor, connecting with The Cour, before joining with the River Spean near Killiechonate.

 

ALLT COIRE AN FHIR DHUIBH:

“Corrie Burn of the Dark Man.”  Located east of Tom na Sroine.  Runs down into Allt Coire an Eoin.

 

ALLT COIRE AN LIGHTUINN / ALLT COIRE (AN) LIGH’-TUINN:

“Stream of the Hollow of Floods” or “Corrie Burn of the Flood-Wave.”   A mountain stream rising near Stob a’ Ghrianain and flowing in an eastern direction for over one mile, where it becomes confluent with the River Loy, at Barr.  

 

ALLT COIRE AN LOCHAIN:

“Corrie Burn of the Little Loch.”  A stream that runs down from Lochan an t-Suidhe to an intersection with Allt a' Mhuilinn, east of Lochyside.

(also see: Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe)

 

ALLT COIRE AN RAITH:

“Corrie Burn of the Circular Fort.”  Runs down from between Stob Ban and Stob Corrie Laoigh, flowing into Abhainn Rath west of Luibeilt.

 

ALLT COIRE AN STAIGEIN MHOIR:

“Corrie Stream of the Large, Obstinate, Boorish Person.”  Located northeast Sgorr Mhurlagain.

 

ALLT COIRE AN TAGRAIDH:

“The Stream of the Corrie of Disputation.”  A mountain stream rising in Coire an Tagraidh that flows in an eastern direction and joined the River Caig on the south side of Lochan an Fhudeir.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

ALLT COIRE AN T-SEILICH:

“The Stream of the Corry of the Willow.”  A small stream rising in Coire an t-Seilich and flowing in a western direction before joining Allt an Fhudair at Caochan Ban.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

ALLT COIRE ‘BHOTRAIS:

“Stream of the Corry of the Rough Miry Holes.”  A stream rising in Coire Bhotrais that flows north, falling into the River Mallie in An ‘tSeann Fhrith.

 

ALLT COIRE ‘CHAISIL:

“The Stream of the Corry of the Ford.”  A “considerable stream” rising a short distance southwest of Meall an Fhir-eoin, flowing into the River Pean.

 

ALLT COIRE CHOILLE-RAIS / ALLT COIRE COILLE ROIS / ALLT COILLE ROIS:

“Stream of the Hollow of the Wood on the Point.”  Also historically known as Allt Gormshuil (though not reflected on contemporary maps).  A stream or burn taking its rise on the east side of Beinn Bhan (near Monadh Beag) that flows through Coire Choille-rais and empties into the west side of Loch Lochy, north of Gairlochy.  Said to be the place where Gormshuil, the Witch of Moy, met her death by accidental drowning.

 

ALLT COIRE CHICHEANAIS:

A mountain stream rising in Coire Chicheanais.  Flows down to the River Dessary, joining that river near Glendessery.

 

ALLT COIRE CHRAOIBHE:

“Stream of the Tree Hollow.”  A stream taking its rise between the summits of Beinn Bhan and Monadh Beag.  Flows in a southern direction before emptying into the Caledonian Canal at Moy.  Along with Coire Chraoibhe, it is the historic dividing line between Easter and Wester Moy.

 

ALLT COIRE COILLE ROIS:

(see: Allt Coire Choille-rais)

 

ALLT COIRE CRAOIBHE:

(see: Allt Coire Chraoibhe)

 

ALLT COIRE DHEIRG / ALLT A’ COIRE DHEIRG:

“Stream of the Red Corrie.”  Scenic stream that flows down to its junction with the River Nevis, at Acharaich.  A considerable portion of the Acharaich Forest Walk allows for views of this stream, with numerous waterfalls.

 

ALLT COIRE EOGHAINN:

“The Burn of Ewen's Corrie.”  Located in Glen Nevis, featuring a waterslide which falls over 1250 feet down the steep sides of Ben Nevis' “shoulder” (Carn Dearg S.W) in an uninterrupted stream from a hanging corrie above.  Also known as the “Sliding Burn.”

 

ALLT COIRE GHAIMHNEAN / ALL COIRE GHAMHNAIN:

“Little Stirk or Yearling Deer Corrie Burn.”  Flows down from just southwest of Ben Nevis through the Five Finger Gully and into River Nevis at Achnacon.

 

ALLT COIRE GIUBHAIS:

“Fir Corrie Burn.”  A stream that runs down from the head of Coire Giubhais (also noted on maps as Coire Giubhsachain) into the Water of Nevis just east of An Steall.

 

ALLT COIRE IONNDRAINN:

“Missing Corrie Burn.”  Runs down from Coire Ionndrainn and becomes Allt Ionndrainn, which runs through Gleann Collaraig before emptying into the River Roy northeast of Roy Bridge.

 

ALLT COIRE MHUILLIN:

“The Mill Burn.”  A mountain stream rising in Coire Mhuilinn, on Beinn Bhan’s south face.  Flows to the south, where it becomes confluent with the River Loy near Inverskilavulin.

(also see: Allt a’ Mhuillin)

 

ALLT COIRE NA GABHALACH / ALLT COIRE NA GHABHAIL:

“Corrie of the Lease Burn.”  Located west of Binnean Beag and Binnean Mor.  Runs north from Coire Gabhalach (Coire Ghabhail) into the Water of Nevis, east of An Steall.

 

ALLT COIRE NAM MUSGAN:

(see: Allt Coire a’ Mhusgs Ain)

 

ALLT COIRE NAN GALL:

“Burn of the Hollow of the Lowlanders” or “Corrie of the Strangers Burn.”  A large mountain stream rising in Coire nan Gall and flowing nearly due north until reaching the Uideireach, where it changes course and flows due east into Loch a’ Chliabhan.

 

ALLT COIRE NA H-IOLAIRE:

“The Stream of the Eagle’s Hollow.”  A mountain stream rising in Coire na h-Iolaire and entering Allt a’ Cham Doire near its confluence with the River Mallie.

 

ALLT COIRE NAM BO:

“Stream of the Coire of the Cow.”  Runs from Coire nam Bo down to Uisge Dubh, just north of Stronenaba.

 

ALLT COIRE NAM FUARAN / ALLT COIRE NAN FUARAN:

“Burn of the Hollow of the Springs.”  A small stream rising in Coire nan Fuaran that flows south for a short distance before falling into the River Mallie.

 

ALLT COIRE NAN LAOGH:

“Stream of the Calves’ Corry.”  A mountain stream rising in Coire nan Laogh, flowing in a western direction before joining the River Caig at Fedden.  North of the Clunes Forest.

 

ALLT COIRE NAN UTH:

“Stream of the Corry of the Udders.”  A large mountain stream rising at the head of Coire nan Uth that flows southwest in the River Dessary.

 

ALLT COIRE ODHAR BEAG:

“The Stream of the Small Dun Corry.”  A small stream rising in the corry of the same name.  Joins with the Allt Cam Bealach, which in turn flows into the River Caig near Allt Coire Odhar Mor.  North of the Clunes Forest.

 

ALLT COIRE ODHAR MOR:

“The Stream of the Large Dun Corry.”  A small stream rising in the corry of the same name.  Joins the River Caig near Allt Cam Bealach.  North of the Clunes Forest.

 

ALLT COIRE RAITH:

(see: Allt Coire an Raith)

 

ALLT CREAG INNIS NAM BO / ALLT CREAG INNIS NAM BORD:

“Burn of the Rock Island of the Cow” or “Burn of the Rock of Tables.”  A small stream that rises northwest of Coire Choille-rais and flows northeast into Loch Lochy, just north of the entrance to Achnacarry (between the gates and the access drive to St. Ciaran’s Church).

(also see: Gray Mare’s Tail)

 

ALLT CREAG NAN EACH:

“The Burn of the Horses Rock.”  A stream rising to the north of Creag nan Each and flowing north, falling into the River Mallie approximately one mile above its confluence with Loch Arkaig.

 

ALLT CRICHE:

“March Burn.”  A small stream rising out of Lochan Tri Chrioch that flows northeast, falling into the River Loy near Erracht.

 

ALLT CUINICH:

(see: Allt Caonich)

 

ALLT CUIRNEAN / ALLT CHAORUINN:

“Stream of the Cairn” or “Stream of the Rowan Trees.”  Runs from near Streap down through Gleann Cuirnean / Gleann Chaoruinn, joining the River Pean, which in turns empties into Loch Arkaig at its western end.

 

ALLT DAIL NA MINE:

“The Meal Field Stream.”  Located north of Glenree.

 

ALLT DAIM:

“Reservoir Stream.”  Runs down from the western slope of Aonach Mor and eventually splits, becoming Allt na Caillich (and heading generally west before emptying into the River Lundy) and north toward Donie/Dawnie, where it also intersects the River Lundy.  The area formed between these two branches of the river form the beginning of Gleann Domhanaidh.

 

ALLT DAIRN:

A stream that runs from near Carn Dearg Meandhonach down past Meall Breac to the northwest, where it intersects with Allt na Callich.

 

ALLT DEARG:

“Red Burn.”  Located southeast of Dalriach in Glen Roy.

(also see: Allt na h-Urchaire)

 

ALLT DOIRE AN T-SIOSALAICH:

“Burn of Chisholm’s Oak Grove/Woods.”  A small stream rising on the south side of Loch Briobaig that flows south before falling into the River Mallie approximately one mile west of Invermallie.

 

ALLT DOIRE MHEAR:

“Wobbling Oak Grove Stream?”  Runs down from near the northern slope of Stob Coire a’ Chearcaill down to the north where it joins An Dubh Uisge, which in turn empties into Loch Eil, near Duisky.

 

ALLT DOGHA:

“Burdock Burn.”  Also known locally as “Annat Burn.”  A large stream west of Corpach which was damned up during WWII to form a water supply reservoir for Corpach and Caol.  The source of the stream is on the slopes of Druim Fada, a short distance west of the lochan.

 

ALLT DOMHNALL AN T-SIUCAIR:

(see: Allt a’ Mhuilinn – downtown Fort William citation)

 

ALLT DUBH:

“The Dark/Black Stream.”  A stream that rises approximately ½ mile northwest of Gleann Tarsuinn and flows south into Loch Arkaig at Achnasaul.

 

ALLT DUBHAIG:

“Deep Dark Pool Stream.”  Located just south of Duisky, near Loch Eil’s southern shore.  Flows down from Doire na Sleaghaich into Loch Eil, near Rubha Dubh Uisge.

 

ALLT FAIRCIDH:

“Bathing Burn.”  Runs down from near Stob Coire a’ Chearcaill, in Ardgour, and empties into Loch Eil just west of Blaich.

 

ALLT FASADH N H EIRIDH:

“Stream of the Rising Point.”  A small stream rising in Torr a’ Ghallain and flowing south for a short distance before falling into Loch Lochy near Torr Liath (Tom Liath?)

 

ALLT FIONN DOIRE:

A stream originating near the eastern slope of Meall Onfhaidh, running down into An t-Suileag near the head of Glen Suileag.

 

ALLT GARBH:

A stream that runs from north of Meall an t-Suidhe to the west, where it intersects with the River Nevis near the Claggan and the Roaring Mill.

 

ALLT GEAL:

“White Burn.”  A small stream rising on the south side of Beinn a Bhan (Beinn Bhan?) and flowing south into the Caledonian Canal near Bun Loy (Bun na Laoigh).

 

ALLT GLAS:

“The Grey Stream.”  A small stream rising on the south base of Leac Chorrac that flows south into Loch Lochy, on its west shore. 

 

ALLT GLAS DHOIRE:

"Stream of the Blue-Green Clump of Trees."  Tributary to the River Roy, east of Glen Roy.  Also a stream near Glaster, west of Loch Lochy.

 

ALLT GLAS DHOIRE / ALLT GLASTER:

“Stream of the Blue-Green Clump of Trees.”  A stream that rises on the north slope of Meall Dubh and flows east past Glaster before falling into Loch Lochy.  Also a tributary to the River Roy, east of Glen Roy.

 

ALLT GLAS DHOIRE MOR:

“The Stream of the Great Grey Oak Grove.”  A small stream rising in Coire Leacach that flows southward before entering Loch Lochy on its west shore.

 

ALLT GLASTER:

(see: Allt Glas Dhoire)

 

ALLT GLEANN NA GHUIBSACHAN / ALLT GLEANN A’ GHIUBHAIS:

“Glen of the Fir-Tree Stream.”  Located west of Loch na Staoineig.  Flows down into Abhainn Rath west of Staoineag.

 

ALLT GLEANN NAN IOLAIREAN:

(see: Allt Iolairean)

 

ALLT GORMSHUIL:

(see: Allt Coire Choille-ros)

 

ALLT IAIN:

“John’s Stream.”  A small stream rising on the north side of Ruighe na Beinne and flowing into the River Caig.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

ALLT IOLAIREAN / ALLT GLEANN NAN IOLAIREAN:

“Glen of the Eagles Stream.”  Flows down through Gleann Iolairean into Loch Treig, at its head.

 

ALLT IONNDRAINN:

“Missing Corrie Burn.”  Fed by All Coire Ionndrainn, up in Coire Ionndrainn, this stream runs through Gleann Collaraig before emptying into the River Roy northeast of Roy Bridge.

 

ALLT LIATH:

“Grey Burn.”  A stream rising on the north side of Meall a’ Phubuill and flowing northward, falling into the River Mallie.

 

ALLT MAIRI:

“Mary’s Burn.”  Located roughly between Stroneba and Blarour.

 

ALLT MEALLAN DOIRE SHLEAGHAICH / SLEAGHAICH:

“Hill Stream of the Oak Grove Spear?”  Runs into the head of the South Garvan River, which in turn runs into Loch Eil near Garvan. 

 

ALLT MEALL AN TIONAIL:

“Hill of the Sheep Gathering Stream.”  Runs from Meall an Tionail down into the confluent Allt a’ Chuil Choire and Allt Coire an Eoin, in the Killiechonate Forest.

 

ALLT MEALL AN T-SEAMRAIG:

“Burn of the Hill of the Clovers / Four Leaf Clovers / Shamrocks.”  A stream rising on the northast side of Beinn Bhan that flows north, becoming confluent with Allt a Choire Dhuibh, which in turns joins the River Mallie just west of Invermallie. 

 

ALLT MEURACH:

“Branchy Birn.”  Located near Glenree.

 

ALLT MHICAONGHAIS:

“MacInnes Burn.”  Located near Achintore.

 

ALLT MHUIC:

“Swine Stream.”  A mountain stream rising a short distance south of Lochan an Fhithich that flows in a southern direction until joining with Loch Arkaig at Muick.

 

ALLT MHUIC BEAG:

A mountain stream rising on the south side of Sgor Choinich and flowing south until emptying into Loch Arkaig west of Muick.

 

ALLT MHURLAGAIN / ALLT MURLAGGAN:

“Stream of the Hollow Moor,” “Stream of the Walled-in-Hollow” or “Stream of the Little Bay” (translations vary). A “considerable stream” that rises from the south slope of Sgurr (Sgor) Mhurlagain south to a junction with Loch Arkaig, at Murlaggan.

 

ALLT MOR:

“Large Stream.”  A mountain stream rising on the northeast side of Glas Bheinn and flowing into the River Caig.  North of the western end of the Dark Mile.

 

ALLT MOR COIRE NAN GEUR-OIREAN:

“The Large Stream of the Sharp Ridges.”  A stream located on the north side of Mullach Coille nan Geuroirean that flows northward, falling into Loch Arkaig a mile west of Eilean a’ Ghiubhais.

 

ALLT MUICK:

see: Allt Mhuic)

 

ALLT MUICK BEAG:

(see: Allt Mhuic Beag)

 

ALLT NA BRIOBAIG:

“Stream of Briobaig” or “Stream of the Small Sum of Money” (translations vary).  A small stream rising in Loch Briobaig and flowing northwest before falling into Loch Arkaig on its southern shore, in Guisach.

 

ALLT NA CAILLICH / ALLT NA CAILLICHE / ALLT CHAILLICH:

“Old Woman’s Stream.”  A stream that runs from near Meall Breac to the west, where it intersects with the River Lundy near Loch Nam Marag.  Also a stream that runs from north of Caillich (on the north shore of Loch Arkaig) and a small stream that flows into the River Caig north of Achnasaul Woods.

 

ALLT NA CAILLICH / ALLT NA CAILLICHE / ALLT CHAILLICH:

“Old Woman’s Stream.”  A stream that runs from north of Caillich to its junction with Loch Arkaig, on its northern shore.  Legend has it that some of Bonnie Prince Charlie’s French gold was said to have been hidden near here by Dr. Archibald Cameron following the Battle of Culloden.  Also a stream that interescts with the River Lundy near Loch Nam Marag and a small stream that flows into the River Caig north of Achnasaul Woods. 

 

ALLT NA CAILLICH / ALLT NA CAILLICHE / ALLT CHAILLICH:

“Old Woman’s Stream.”  A small stream rising in Gleann an Dubh and flowing into the River Caig, north of Achnasaul Woods.  Also a stream that intersects with the River Lundy near Loch Nam Marag and a stream that runs from north of Caillich, on the north shore of Loch Arkaig east of Murlaggan.

 

ALLT NA DUBH CHLAISE:

“Burn of the Black Hollow.”  A small stream rising in Coire Dubh Chlaise and flowing north, falling into the River Loy near Erracht.

 

ALLT NA EACH:

“Horses Stream.”  A small stream rising on the south side of Monadh Uisge Mhuilinn that flows south, falling into the River Loy just west of Erracht.

 

ALLT NA FEITHE:

“The Stream of the Marsh.”  A small stream rising in Feith a’ Chitheanais that flows south into the River Dessary, near Glendessary.

 

ALLT NA FHAING:

(see: Allt an Fhaing)

 

ALLT NA H-EIRGHE:

“Stream of the Hollow of the Deer Gathering.”  A small stream taking its rise in a hollow east of Am Mam and slowing to the south for about ¾ of a mile, where it joins the River Loy near the ruins of Achadh na h-Eirghe.  This stream forms the historic border between Inverness and Argyll for about ¾ of its course. 

 

ALLT NA H-EIRIGH:

“Stream of the Rebellion or Rising.”  Located in Ardgour.  Runs down from just north of Ceann Caol toward Loch Eil, where it empties into the loch at Blaich.

 

ALLT NA H-EIRIDH:

“Stream of the Rising.”  A small stream rising in the hills near Tom nan Naoi-uairean and flowing northeast toward a fall into the River Arkaig, just north of Achnacarry Castle.  This stream runs just to the north of the ruins of Old Achnacarry and the Old Stables.

 

ALLT NA H-URCHAIRE:

“Stream of the Shot.”  Also commonly known as the “Red Burn,” especially to those ascending Ben Nevis via the Tourist Track/Trail.  Located on Ben Nevis’ western face.  The stream has flows down from Coire na h-Urchaire (near Carn Dearg) and empties into the River Nevis between Glen Nevis House and Achnacon. 

(also see: Allt Dearg)

 

ALLT NA LAIRIGE:

“Stream of the Pass” (the pass named being Lairig Leacach).  Located between the eastern-most of the two Stob Coire Easain's and Stob Choire Claurih, near the Allt na Lairige.

 

ALLT NA LAIRIGE MOIRE / MOR:

“Burn of the Big Pass Between Two Hills.”  Located southeast of Lundavra.

 

ALLT NAM BRUACH:

“Burn of the Banks.”  Flows down from just north of Creag nam Meann to the River Spean.  The mouth of this river, at the Spean, is east of Achnacochine.

 

ALLT NAM FIGHEADAIREAN:

“Weaver’s Burn.”  Located in Fort William.  This burn flows down from the Cow Hill, near Alma Road and joins Allt a’ Bhudhaigire.

 

ALLT NAM MEANN:

“The Kids Stream.”  A small stream rising on the west side of Ruighe na Beinne and flowing into the River Caig.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

ALLT NA MOLAICH:

“The Stream of the Grass.”  A small stream rising on the southeast base of Leac Chorrach, flowing south into Loch Lochy on its west shore.

 

ALLT NAN DATHADAIREAN:

“The Dyer's Burn,” also locally known as “The Ash Burn.”  Located south of Fort William, with both the A82 and Lundavra Road crossings.  This place name probably relates to the small industry of wool and cloth dyeing in Fort William, circa 1745.

(also see: Achan a' Chath)

 

ALLT NA NATHRACH:

“The Adder’s Burn.”  Located west of Kinlochleven.

(also see: Alltnaray)

 

ALLTNARAY / ALLT NATHRACH:

“Adder’s Burn.”  Located in Glen Gloy, nearly die east of Letterfinlay. 

 

ALLT NA SROINE:

“Stream of the Snout.”  A mountain stream rising in Coire Fada that flows to the north and becomes confluent with the An t-Suileag.  Northeast of Coille Mhor.

 

ALLT NA UAN:

“The Lamb’s Stream.”  A mountain stream that rises north of Sron a’ Bhuiridh and joins with Allt a’ Coire Dhuibh near the River Mallie.

 

ALLT NEURLAIN / ALLT NIOR-LAN:

“Never Full or Overflowing Burn.”  Located north of Beinn Iaruinn, with its source in Coire Neurlain / Nior-lan. 

 

ALLT ODHAR:

“Dun Colored Burn.”  Located near Spean Bridge (runs into the River Speanbetween Blarour and Tirindish).  Its source is near Meall nan Luath.

 

ALLT REIDH:

(see: Abhainn Rath)

 

ALLT RUARAIDH / ALLT RUAIRIDH:

“Rory’s Burn.”  Located southeast of Stronenaba.  Flows down into Allt Mairi.

 

ALLT RUIGHE AN ACHAIDH BHRIC:

“The Stream of the Herding-Place of the Checkered Field.”  A small stream, approximately one mile in length, located about ½ mile northeast of Coire a’ Bhalachain.  A portion of its course forms the historic boundary between the parishes of Kilmallie and Kilmonivaig.

 

ALLT RUIGHE NAN FIADH:

“Stream of the Deers Slope.”  A mountain stream rising about ¾ of a mile north of the source of the River Mallie and flowing in an eastern direction for about ¾ of a mile when it becomes confluent with the River Mallie.

 

ALLT SHEANGAIN:

“Ant Stream.”  Runs from just north of Meall Bhanabhie southeast toward Tor Castle, along Gleann Laragain.

 

ALLT SEANG AN AONAICH BHIG:

“Roebuck Burn of the Little Height.”  Located north of Allt an Oir, in the Ben Nevis range.

 

ALLT SLOC NAN UAN:

“Hollow of the Lamb’s Burn.”   A burn located southeast of Ben Nevis’ summit.  Flows eastward into Allt Coire Giubhais.  

 

ALLT SRON AN FHEARNA:

“Burn of the Projection of Alders.”  A small stream rising on the north side of Lullach Coire nan Gearran and flowing northward for a short distance before falling into Loch Arkaig, just west of Eilean a’ Ghiubhais.

 

ALLT TARSUINN:

“Crosswise Stream,” “Cross Stream,” “Traverse Stream” or “Oblique Stream.”  A mountain stream rising on the south side of Meall Coire nana Saobhaidh, flowing southeast before joining the River Caig at Allt Bealach Easain.  In Gleann Tarsuin, north of the foot of Loch Arkaig.

 

ALLT TOM A’ CHOMHNALTRAIDH:

“Stream of the Disputation or Much Speaking.”  A small stream rising in the hill just east of Tom an Fhithich that flows south before falling into Allt Tom an Fhithich, west of Clunes.

 

ALLT TOM AN FHITHICH:

“Stream/Burn of the Mound of the Ravens.”  Located just north of the Dark Mile, east of the River Caig.  Flows down from near Creag Dhonn toward the Dark Mile. 

 

ALLT UCHDAIN MHOIR:

“Stream of the Great Hillock.”  A small stream rising on the southeast base of Beinn Chraoibh that flows south until entering Loch Arkaig west of Ardachie. 

 

ALLT UILLEIM:

“William’s Burn.”  Located north of Cranachan.  Flows down into the River Roy.

 

ALTNARAY:

Located in Glen Gloy, due east of Letterfinlay.

 

ALTRUA / ALLT RUADH:

“Red Stream.” Along the eastern shore of Loch Lochy at its midpoint, just south of Letterfinlay.

 

AM BLAR DUBH:

“The Black Field.”  Located just south of the River Spean, in the Braes of Lochaber, west of Achluachrach.

 

AM BLAR MOR:

(see: Corpach Moss)

 

AM BODACH:

“The Old Man.”  A mountain located north of Kinlochleven

 

AM BREUN CHAMAS:

(see: Breuncamus)

 

AM FASADH FEARNA:

(see: Fassifern)

 

AMHAINN CHIA-AIG:

(see: Caig River)

 

AM MAM:

“The Low Hill.”  A low piece of ground on the watershed between Beinn Bhan and Druim Gleann Laoigh.  Between Glen Mallie and Glen Loy, northeast of Achnanellan.

 

AN AIRD:

“The Headland.”  Located just north of downtown Fort William, along the shore of Loch Linnhe.

 

AN CAMHANN:

“The Strait, Gorge or Defile.”  A narrow defile located at the northwest extremity of Glen Derrary. 

 

AN CAOL:

“Isle of the Narrow” or “Narrow Isle.”  Located near the head of Loch Linnhe, just north of Fort William.  This small island is substantially larger (longer, running to the north) at low tide.  South of modern day Caol, a village on the Corpach Moss.

(also see: Caol)

 

AN CLIOF:

“The Cliff.”  The site of a landing pier (in 1875) located approximately ¼ mile south of Clunes.

 

AN COMHNARD:

“The Plain” or “The Smooth Plain.”  A portion of flat soft ground located on the west end of Beinn Bhan.

 

AN DOIRE CRUINN:

“The Round Oak Grove.”  Located on the northern side of Glen Laragain, between Muirshirlich and Sron Liath.

 

ANDOIT:

An early form of the placename Annat.

(see: Annat)

 

AN DUBH UISGE / DUBH UISGE:

“Black Water” or “Dark Water.”  A stream located in Ardgour that flows generally northward until emptying into Loch Eil at Duisky (an old township that took its name from the stream) on the south shore of Loch Eil, at its midpoint.

 

AN EAG:

“The Notch.”  A small hollow or cut in the hill located approximately 1/3 mile east of Meall Fuaran na Feola.

 

AN GEARASDAN:

“The Garrison.”

(see: Fort William)

 

AN GUIREAN:

“The Pimple or Postule.”  A hill feature located due south of Lianachan, near the Allt Coire an Eoin.

 

AN LINNE DHUBH:

(see: Loch Linnhe)

 

AN LINNE SHEILEACH:

(see: Loch Linnhe)

 

ANNAT / ANNAID / ANDOIT:

“The Site of a Church/Chapel,” “Local Patron Saint’s Church Where His Relics Were Kept” or “Watery Place.”  Located at the entrance of Loch Eil, on the northern shore, just west of Corpach.   Said to have been the site of a very early church or chapel, possibly the precursor of Kilmalie or connected with Corpach.  Tradition states that this was the place where St. Columba built a mission-station in the 6th century, during his work to bring Christianity to the Picts.  The original settlement at Annat consisted of cottages stretching from Cnoc Nam Faobh westward to about one mile west of Camus Na H-atha.  The western portion was known as Lower Annat.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron, MacIntosh, McPhersonand Boyd tenants.  Also a place near the head of Glen Roy.   

 

ANNAT / ANNAID / ANDOIT:

Located near the head of Glen Roy.  Also a place at the entrance to Loch Eil, on the northern shore, just west of Corpach.

 

ANNAT BURN:

(see: Allt Dogha)

 

ANNAT NARROWS:

Located just south of the settlement of Annat.  Loch Eil significantly narrows here (only 100 meters in width, shore to shore).  Also known simply as “The Narrows.”

 

AN SIDHEAN:

“The Fairy Hill.”  Located south of South Garvan, in Ardgour.

 

AN SLOGAN / AN SLUGAN:

(see: Sloggan, The)

 

AN SPUT:

(see: Spout, The)

 

AN STEALL / ANN STEALL BHAN:

(see: Upper Falls of Nevis)

 

AN T-AOINEADH MOR

(see: Inniemore)

 

AN T-EILEAN UAINE:

Green Island.”  Said to be located off Corpach, but does not seem to be another name for one of the four known island in that area.

 

AN TORRADH MOR:

(see: Torr a’ Mor)

 

AN T-SAIL:

“The Heel.”  A hill located approximately ½ mile from Coire nan Gall.  In 1875 this was the joint property of Cameron of Lochiel and Mr. Baird of Gartsheuie.

 

AN T'SEINN FRITH / AN T-SEANN FHRITH:

“The Old Forest.”  A remnant of the ancient Caledonian Forest of Scots Pines that once covered a large portion of Scotland.  Surviving portions extend from the Mam to near the Allt Coire Coille Rois, along the south-side of the River Mallie, in Glen Mallie and up onto the slopes of Beinn Bhan.

(also see: Guisach)

 

AN T-SRON:

(see: Strone)

 

AN T-SUILEAG:

(see: Suileag - River)

 

AODANN CHLEIREIG:

“Cleric’s Slope.”  Located between Gleann Fionnlighe and Gleann Suileag, due north of Corrybeg.

 

AONACH:

(see: Onich)

 

AONACHAN / UNACHAN:

“Little Market Place.”  Located just southwest of Spean Bridge.

 

AONACH AN NID:

“Hill of the Eyrie/Secluded Position.”  A hill located on the northern slope of Aonach Mor.

 

AONACH BEAG:

“Little Height” or “Small Moor.”  A mountain located east of the summit of Ben Nevis and south of its “sister mountain,” Aonach Mor.  

 

AONACH MOR:

“Big Height” or “Big Moor.”  A mountain located just north-east of the sumit of Ben Nevis, south of the Killiechonate Forest and north of its “sister mountain,” Aonach Beag.  Since 1988-89, the mountain has been home to Scotland's only gondola system, at the Nevis Range Ski Centre.  The trip to the top is one and one-half miles in length and takes 15 minutes to ascend 2,000 feet.  For the sake of clarity and ease of recognition the area was re-named (for the tourist trade) “Nevis Range.” 

 

AONAIBH RI CHÉILE:

Motto of Clan Cameron - "Unite"/"Let us Unite"

 

ARC:

(see: Arcabhi)

 

ARCABHI / ARKAVIE / ARKANE / ARK / ARC:

Possibly meaning “Corn Granaries,” though the placename may also refer to an ark or chest.  Located on the north shore of Loch Arkaig, between Caonich and Caillich. At one time considered a part of the Callich lands (and was formerly inhabited) on the Lochiel Estate.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons and MacMillans as tenants.

 

ARDACHVIE / ARDECHIVE / ARDACH BHUIDHE:

“Horse Headland,” “Horse Promontory” or “Golden High Place.”  Just northwest of Achnasaul, on the north shore of Loch Arkaig.  Due south of Beinn Chraoibh.

 

ARDGOUR / ARDGOBHAR / AIRD GHOBHAR:

"Promontory of Gabran" (the son of King Fergus of Ulster) or “romontory of the Goat"/"Promontory Sloping." A 100 mile square district of high hills and deep glens, stretching southward from Loch Eil to Loch Sunart, and westward from Loch Linnhe to Loch Sheil.

Also a former MacLean manse and present-day village situated within Kilmalie Parish, across from Corran on Loch Linnhe.  There were several families of Camerons living in this area, and the area was an ancient stronghold of the MacMasters.

(see: Glenhurich)

(see: Rudha Dearg)

 

ARDGOUR'S TOWEL:

A scenic waterfall, "behind" Ardgour, which, from its whiteness received the name.

 

ARDNAMURCHAN:

Lands owned by the Duke of Argyll, outside of the traditional "Cameron Country," that were settled in the early seventeenth century by Camerons of Glendessary and Dungallon.  Cleared of Camerons by the Argyll estate after 1746.  Presently a sparsely populated village.

 

ARD NOIS:

(see: Aird Nois)

 

ARDROY:

(see: Erracht)

 

ARISAIG:

Thought to be the location of one of six chapels that Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, was directed to build by the Pope, circa 1639, in order to "expiate his sins" from so many years of Highland battle and conflict.

 

ARK:

(see: Arcabhi)

 

ARKAIG FORDS:

Formerly strategic fords in the River Arkaig (especially in the mid-seventeenth century), about 300 yards down river from Loch Arkaig.  Near Achnacarry.

Standoff at the Ford of Arkaig, September 1665.

 

ARKAIG (RIVER) / ABHAINN AIRCEIG:

“River of The Small Trout.”  A rapidly flowing river running from Loch Arkaig, past Achnacarry and emptying into Loch Lochy at Bun Arkaig.  Only about one mile in length.

(also see: Arkaig Fords)

 

ARKAVIE:

(see: Arcabhi)

 

ARM, THE:

A hill, overlooking Achnacarry, below which in a cave Lochiel hid from the Duke of Cumberland's men in 1746.  From here he witnessed the burning of Achnacarry.  He would later host Prince Charles Edward Stuart here.

 

ARMORIAL BEARINGS (OF CAMERON OF LOCHIEL):

Three Bars, Gules (heraldic name of tincture red).  Only to be used by the Chief of Clan Cameron.

 

ARYHOULAN / AIRIGH SHUARLAIN:

“Suarlan’s Sheiling.”  Located near the foot of Glen Scaddle, just west of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

ASH BURN / ASHBURN:

(see: Allt nan Dathadairean)

 

ATH CHIA-AIG:

“The Ford of Kaig.”  Previoius to the opening of the Caledonian Canal there was a ford across Loch Lochy at this location, but it became unserviceable owing to the water level of Loch Lochy being raised about ten feet.  A stone bridge was erected in its stead, at Bunarkaig (Drochaid Arkaig) but this nearby location still retains the name.  Not associated with the River Caig or Caig Falls, which are located to the northwest, toward the end of the Dark Mile.

 

AUCHADERRY:

(see: Achaderry)

 

AUCHANDAUL / AUCHANDAULL:

(see: Achandaul)

 

AUCHANDAULL BURN:

(see: Allt Achadh na Dalach)

 

AUCHAVARIE / ACHAVARIE / ACHADH A’ BHEARRAIDH:

“Field of the Shearing.”  Located near the head of Glen Gloy.

 

AUCHLAGAN:

(see: Claggan)

 

AUCHNABOBANNE / AUCHNABOBANE / ACHADH NAM BO BAN:

“Field of the White Cows.”  This placname is possibly related to the old tradition where fairy cows visited certain fields.  Located due south of High Bridge.

 

AUCHNADALL:

(see: Achandaul)

 

AUCHNAHANATE / ACHNAHANNET / ACHADH NA H-ANNAIDE:

“Field of the Local Patron Saint’s Church.”  Located on the north side of the A82, just southwest of Spean Bridge. 

 

AUCHNAHERRY:

(see: Achnaherry)

 

BAC NAM FOID:

A large hollow in a watershed, located about ½ mile east of Ceann Samhraidh.

 

BADABRIE / BAD ABRACH / BADABRY / BAD-ABARACH:

“Lochaberman’s Thicket” or “Marshy Thicket.”  One time wood or thicket and rounded projection of the hillside, near Tomonie.  One unproven Lochaber tradition has Alan, XVI Chief of Clan Cameron, leaving his home at Eilean nan Craobh circa 1530 and building a new residence here, prior to rebuilding the ruins of Tor Castle as his seat of power.  French gold coins were found buried here in the 1850s.

 

BAD A’ CHROCHADAIR:

“Hangman’s Thicket.”  Located south of the River Lochy, due south of Tor Castle.  There may be some association with this placename and one of the former owners of Tor Castle – not necessarily the Camerons of Lochiel.

 

BADGE:

(see: Crest)

 

BAGPIPE MUSIC:

(see: Piobaireachdan)

 

BAIL A’ CHAOLAIS:

(see: Ballachulish)

 

BAINBHIDH:

(see: Banavie)

 

BALLACHULISH / BALLICHULISH (NORTH BALLICHULISH) / BAIL A’ CHAOLAIS:

“Settlement of the Narrows” or “Township of the Narrows.”  A village with rich meadowlands on the Lochaber side of Loch Leven, near its junction with Loch Linnhe (at the narrows); 11 miles south of Fort William.  Ballachulish was built in an area originally known as the Vale of Laroch, or – in old records – Laroch.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron and MacKenzie tenants.  Location of a ferry across Loch Leven since the early/mid-1700's - a short cut to Fort William (Ballachulish Ferry).  Home to the Ballachulish Slate Quarries, which were first used commercially in the 17th century but closed in 1955.

(also see: MacPatrick's / MacPeter’s Narrows)

(also see: Clach Pharuig)

 

BALVENIE:

(see: Camerons of Speyside)

 

BANAVIE / BAINBHIDH / BANBHAIDH / BANVY / BANBH / BANAGHAIDH:

There are many theories to the origin of this place.  It is thought to mean either "Fair Pass/Hill-face," "Pig Stream," "High Place," "Fallow Land" “Young Suckling Pig” “Land Unplowed for a Year” or "Place of the Pigs."  Just east of the village of Corpach, by the River Lochy, in Glen Loy.  Location where Clan Cameron officially took possession of the Barony of Lochiel in the 15th century (principle messuage or place of infeftment).  There are some who contend that the Irish Patron Saint, Patrick, was born at Banavie.   The first inn built here was constructed on orders from Lochiel, in 1830.  Presently a village which is home to the Caledonian Canal’s Neptune's Staircase.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron, MacPhie (MacPhee), McIntosh, MacAcharn (MacEachern) and MacKairlich tenants. 

 

BANNOCKBURN (THE BATTLE OF):

June 24, 1314.

 

BANQUO'S WALK / SRAID BHANCO:

An ancient avenue (level path or road) close to the River Lochy, 20 feet or more broad, and one-quarter mile long, lined with beech, sycamore, oak and birch trees, leading north from Torcastle.  This location recalls the Thane of Lochaber and is said to be frequented by Banquo's ghost!

 

BARCALDINE, (THE CAMERONS OF):

This family is descended from Donald Charles Cameron, the third son of Donald Charles Cameron of Dawnie, who in 1842 purchased the estate of Barcaldine.

 

BARR:

Meaning "Summit" or "Height."  Located in Glen Loy.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons and MacOilvaans as tenants.  A branch of the MacGillonies resided here, from the sixteenth century until at least the eighteenth century. 

 

BAY OF THE NARROWS:

(see: Camusnagaul)

 

BATTLE OF THE SHIRTS, (THE):

(see: Blar-nan-Leine, The Battle of)

 

BEALACH A’ CHOIRE BHEITHICH:

“The Pass of the Corry of the Birch.”  A hollow feature located on the west side of Meall a’ Bhlair, near Loch Blair and north of Loch Arkaig.

 

BEALACH AN EASAIN:

“Pass of the Small Waterfall.”  A hollow feature, located on the west side of Meall an Tagraidh.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

BEALACH CARN NA H-URCHAIRE:

“The Pass of the Cairn of the Shot.”  A hollow feature located to the northeast of Geal Charn and to the west of Meall Coire nan Saobhaidh.  North of Loch Arkaig.

 

BEALACH CHOIR’ A’ GHUIREIN”

“The Pass of the Corrie of the Spot/Pimple.”  A hollow feature, located on the northeast side of Meall na h-Eilde, north of the Dark Mile.

 

BEECH AVENUE, (THE):

The trees which make up this avenue at Achnacarry were planted along the side of the River Arkaig by Donald "The Gentle Lochiel" Cameron, just prior to the commencement of the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745-46.

 

BEINN A’ BHAN:

(see:Beinn Bhan)

 

BEINN AN' SHEACHDA:

A mountain which rises above Corribeg to over 2,000 feet.

 

BEINN AN T-SNEACHDA / BEINN SNEACHDA:

“Mountain of the Snow,” located just north of Kinlochiel.  Macintosh led his men over the "shoulder" of this hill when invading the Disputed Lands.

 

BEINN AN TUIM:

“Mountain of the Thicket.”  Located northeast of Glenfinnan.

 

BEINN BHAN:

"White Mountain" or “Fair Mountain.”  A very “conspicuous mountain, nearly isolated” located due south of Achnacarry (Achnacarry's scenic "backdrop") and north of Glen Loy.  A considerable depression, called An Mam, forms its western boundary and connects it with Druim Glean Laoigh.  Elevation 2,612 feet.  Also a small mountain located south of Coruanan, east of Loch Linnhe and another located southeast of Leanachan Forest.  

 

BEINN BHAN / BEINN A’ BHAN:

“White Mountain” or “Fair Mountain.”  A small mountain located south of Coruanan, east of Loch Linnnhe.  Also a larger mountain due south of Achnacarry and north of Glen Loy and another located southeast of Leanachan Forest. 

 

BEINN BHAN:

“White Mountain” or “Fair Mountain.”  Located southeast of Leanachan Forest, at the northern end of the Grey Corries.  Also a small mountain located south of Coruanan, east of Loch Linnhe and another located south of Achnacarry and north of Glen Loy.  

 

BEINN BHEAG:

“Little Mountain.”  Located southeast of Glen Quoich.

 

BEINN BHREAC:

“Speckled Mountain.”  Located south of Loch Treig.  Legend has it that this ben is haunted.

 

BEINN CHLIANAIG / BEINN CHLAOINAIG:

“Mountain of the Little Declivity/Little Downward Slope.”  Located south of the River Spean and east of the Leanachan Forest.  

 

BEINN CHRAOIBH:

Tree Mountain.”  Located north of Ardachie and Loch Arkaig, and west of Beinn Mheadhoin.  Elevation 2014 feet.

 

BEINN GHARBH:

Rough Mountain.”  A large rocky mountain located approximately ¼ mile northwest of Bealach Leatham, south of Glen Spean.

 

BEINN IARUINN:

Mountain of Iron/Ore.  Located between Glen Gloy and Glen Roy, west of Loch Lochy.

 

BEINN MHEADOIN:

“The Middle Mountain.”  Located between Beinn Chraoibh and Glas Bheinn; hence the name.  North of Achnasaul.

 

BEINN NA CAILLICH:

“The Old Wife’s Mountain.”  Located southeast of Larigmore.

 

BEINN NA CILLE:

“Mountain of the Cell or Church.”  Located in Ardgour.

 

BEINN NA GUCAIG:

“Mountain of the Bubble / Bell / Ball” or “Mountain of the Little Bell Flower.”  Located east of Loch Linnhe and southwest of Lundavra.

 

BEINN NAN EACH:

“Mountain of the Horses.”  Located southwest of Loch Treig and northeast of Luibeilt.

 

BEINN NEIMHEIS:

(see: Ben Nevis)

 

BEINN NIMH UISG:

(see: Ben Nevis)

 

BEINN RIABHAICH:

Located just west of Dun Dige.

 

BEINN SNEACHDA:

(see: Beinn an t-Sneachda)

 

BEN ADEN:

A large, rocky and somewhat prominent hill located approximately one mile northwest of Sgor na Ciche.

 

BEN ALDER:

In the range of this mountain (3,757 feet), at Mullach Coire an Iubhar, Lochiel and Cluny Macpherson sought refuge from Hanoverian troops in the summer of 1746.

 

BEN BHAN:

(see: Beinn Bhan)

 

BEN NEVIS / BEINN NIBHEIS / BEINN NEIMHEI / BEN NOVESH:

Possibly meaning “Mountain, Cloudy and Snowy” or “Mountain of the Biting Cold Water.”  Overlooking Lochaber.  Scotland's highest mountain - 4406 feet of very impressive granite, which in reality consists of two mountains joined together as one.  It is sometimes described as “flanked on the west and south by the Glen and Water of Nevis, on the east by the river and Glen of Treig, and on the north by the river and Glen of Spean.”  The first detailed map of the Scottish Highlands, drawn by Timothy Point in 1595, shows the mountain as "Ben Novesh."

(also see: Glen Nevis)

(also see: Lochan T-uidht)

(also see: Meall an T-suidhe)

(also see: Strone-nevis)

 

BEUL-ATH A' MHEIRLICH:

(see: Thieves' Ford, The)

 

BEUL ATH RUADH:

“Mouth of the Red Ford.”  A ford on the River Loy located just above Drochaid Inverskilavulin.

 

BHEINN:

(see: Gaor Bheinn)

 

BIDEIN BAD NA H LOLAIRE:

Located south of Beinn Riabhaich.

 

BIDEAN MHIC IAIN GHLAIS:

“Pinnacle of Grey John’s Son.”  A peak or point on Fraoch Beinn on its north side, within ¼ mile of Glen Kingie.

 

BINNEIN BEAG:

“Little Pinnacle.”  A moderately-sized mountain located north of Coire an Lochan (the loch by that name in the Mamore Forest, north of Loch Eilde Mor) not the smaller Coire an Lochan, in Glen Nevis. 

 

BINNEIN MOR:

“Large Pinnacle.”  A moderately-sized mountain located northwest of Coire an Lochan (the loch by that name in the Mamore Forest, north of Loch Eilde Mor) not the smaller Coire an Lochan, in Glen Nevis. 

 

BISHOP'S BAY:

Located along the north shore of Loch Leven, just to the northeast of the Ballachulish Bridge.

 

BLACK PARKS:

An old area now considered part of the village of Inverlochy.  Located northeast of An Aird, east of the River Lochy.

 

BLAICH / BLATHAICH:

“Flowery Place.”  A crofting community with a scenic view of Ben Nevis, located on the south shore of Loch Eil, toward its mid-point.

(also see: Torr an Daraich)

 

BLAIR MEANBH:

“Small Plain.”  Located across the River Lochy from Blar Mor (Corpach Moss). 

 

BLARACHAORAN / BLAR A'CHAORAINN / BLAR A’ CHAORUINN:

“Field of the Rowan or Mountain Ash.”  Located northeast of Lochan Lundavra and just east of the River Kiachnish.  In 1841 there was only one family living in this area, Weirs.  Reportedly, there is an ancient burial place at this location. 

 

BLAR AN LOCHAIN:

“The Moss of the Small Loch.”  A piece of moss located between the B8005 and Loch Lochy, southeast of Clunes (and just south of Clunes Bay). 

 

BLAR MAC DROIGHNIGH / BLARMACDRYNIE / BLAR MAC DROIGHNEACH / BLAR MAC DRUINEACH / BLAR NAN DRUINEACH / BLAR MAC DRUIDHEACHD / BLAR MAC DRAOINE / BLAR MAC DREINE:

“Field of the Wise Men,”  “Field of the Son of the Druid” or “Field of the Grinning Sons.”  Located in Nether Lochaber, just south of the West Highland Way, due west of Achraibhach.  One source lists its location as “on the opposite side of the stream from Blarmachfoldach,” but Ordinance Survey maps disagree.  In 1841 there was only one family living in this area, MacLachlans. 

 

BLARMACHFOLDACH / BLAR MAC FAOLTAICH / BLARMACHFHUILDAICH / BLARMAFOALDACH / BLARMACPHAOILDACH / BLARMAKFELDAUCH:

Either meaning "Cold Field," "January Field" “Field of the Hospitable Sons” or “Field of the Son of the Culdee.”  Pronounced “Blar-mac-Cuilteach.”  A small settlement located in the Mamore Hills, on the old military road from Kinlochleven to Fort William, three miles south of Fort William.  It was once a substantial crofting community, due to underlying limestone that gave rise to relatively fertile soil.  In the nineteenth century Blarmachfoldach had a population of over 800, but the population has gradually fallen to a handful of residences.  In 1841 it primarily consisted of Camerons and MacDonalds – the Camerons seem to have been of MacSorlie-Cameron “stock.”  This population decline was exacerbated by a cholera epidemic in the nineteenth century, when a ship in Loch Linnhe brought contaminated linen.

 

The River Kiachnish (River Cìochnis or Cìoch Innis) which originates in Lochan Lundavra and passes through Blarmachfoldach was the source of hydro-electric power for the first electric street lighting in Scotland, in along Fort William's High Street.  The settlement was known locally as one of the last places to celebrate the old Highland New Year on January 12th.

 

BLAR MOR / BLAR MORE / BLAR MHOR / AM BLAR MOR:

(see: Corpach Moss)

 

BLAR MOR AN ERRACHD / BLAR MOR AN ERRACHT:

“Big Moss of Erracht.”  An extensive piece of ground partially pasture and partially peat moss.  Located approximately one mile east of Erracht.

 

BLAR NA H-ANNAIT:

"Plain/Flat Ground of Annat."  A long stretch of flat ground just before Ceann a' Chlaid, in western Camus na H-atha.  Divided into east and west sections by the the Allt Dogha (Annat Burn).  Reaches southward from the main road to the narrows of Loch Eil.

 

BLAR NAN CHLEIREAC / BLAR NAN CLEIRACH:

"Field of the Clerks" or “Field of the Clerics.”  Located near Lundavra.  Perhaps having a connection with the Clark sept of Clan Cameron or having, in the past, a religious settlement.

 

BLAR-NAN-LEINE:

Either "Flat ground of the Shirts" or "Boggy Ground."  Located at the north end of Loch Lochy, on its east side.

(see: Kin-Loch-Lochy, The Battle of)

 

BLAROUR / BLARROVIR / BLAR (D)OBHAR:

“Dun Covered Field” or “Dark/Obscure Field.”  Located just north of Spean Bridge.  A stone here was/is called “Allan’s Stone” and is said to mark the burial spot of the 12th chief of Clan Cameron.

 

BLATHAICH:

(see: Blaich)

 

BOHASKY / BOTH CHASGAIDH / COIRE BOTH-CHASGAIDH:

“Caskie’s Booth” or “Corrie of Caskie’s Booth.”  Located in Glen Roy, just northeast of Achavady.

 

BOHENIE / BOTH FHINNIDH:

“Fenna’s Booth” or “Hut on the steep brae.”  Located just north-east of Roybridge, near the River Roy.

 

BOHUNTINE / BOTH FHIONNTAN:

“Hut of the Beacon-Keeper” or “Fintan’s Booth.”  A small crofting settlement in the Braes of Lochaber, along the River Roy, north of Roybridge.

 

BOHUNTINE HILL:

Located north of Bohuntine.

 

BOLINE / BOTH FHLOINN:

“Flan’s Booth.”  Located near Bohenie, in Glen Roy.

 

BOTH CHASGAIDH:

(see: Bohasky)

 

BOTH FHINNIDH:

(see: Bohenie)

 

BOTH FHIONNTAN:

(see: Bohuntine)

 

BOTH FHLOINN:

(see: Boline)

 

BOTH LOBHACH:

“Putrid Booth.”  Located in Glen Fintaig.

 

BRACKLETTER / BRAC LEITIR:

“Deer Slope.”  Located south of Gairlochy, west of Spean Bridge, near the River Spean.  Home to large present-day sand pits.

 

BRAC LEITIR:

(see: Brackletter)

 

BRAE CULCAIRN:

(see: Culcairn's Brae)

 

BRAES OF ACHNASAUL:

The hillsides near Achnasaul.  Prince Charles Edward Stuart spent a short period of time here in hiding during August, 1746.

 

BRAES OF LOCHABER / BRAE LOCHABER:

"The Hillsides of Lochaber."  The upper part of Lochaber, located along the River Spean, lying around Glen Spean and Glen Roy, north-east of Ben Nevis, extending westward toward Achnacarry.  Along with Nether Lochaber, one of Lochaber's two sub-divisions to the east (east of the Lochy basin) - considered the north-east portion of Lochaber.

 

BRAES OF STRATHDEARN (THE BATTLE OF):

October 1645.

(also see: Moyness)

 

BRAICH BHLAICH:

South of Loch Eil and west of Loch Linnhe.  Just southwest of Ceann Caol.  Altitude 1976 feet.

 

BRAIGHEACH:

(see: Briagach)

 

BRAIGH LOCHABER:

(see: Braes of Lochaber)

 

BRAIGH NA BRIAN COILLE:

“Top of the Rough Wood.”  The south side of Druim Gleann Laoigh, north of Creag Dubh.  North of the River Loy, near the western end of Glen Loy.

 

BRAIGH NA DUBH CHLAISE:

“Top of the Black Hollow.”  An elevated piece of land located due west of Strone.

 

BRAIGH NAN UAMHACHAN:

“The Top of the Caverns” or “Upper Part of the Caves.”  An “eminence” located approximately ½ mile southeast of Lochan a’ Chomhlain, somewhat between the heads of Loch Arkaig and Loch Eil.  The watershed of this location forms part of the historic boundary between Inverness and Argyll.

 

BRAINTOUN:

(see: Maryburgh)

 

BRAGACHE:

(see: Briagach)

 

BREUNCAMUS / BREUNCHAMAS / AM BREUN CHAMAS:

“Stinking Bay.”  A bay located at Corpach that curves round from east of the present site of Corpach to the River Lochy. 

 

BRIAGACH / BRIAGAICH / BRAGACHE / BRAIGHEACH:

“Uplandish.”  Located in Glen Roy, approximately one mile northeast of Achavady.  The farm here was, in generations past, noted for its fertile fields (with one field in specific cited, named “Lag na Mine” – The Meal Hollow).  This is the location of a famed story, relating to the Earl of Mar and a “O’ Byrn Cameron” that is said to have taken place after Mar’s defeat at Inverlochy in 1431. 

 

BRUACH CUCHARN:

(see: Culcairn’s Brae)

 

BRUNIACHAN / BRUNACHAN / BRUIGHNEACHAN:

“Little Tumulus” or “Fairy Hillock.”  Located two miles beyond Achavady, near the head of Glen Roy. An old quarry here was famed in the past for its excellent quern stones which it produced – “Lochaber Stones” - which were highly prized for grinding grains.

(also see: Lochaber Stones)

 

BUAILEACH:

(see: Bulloch)

 

BUINNE A' CHAIT:

(see: Cat Rapids, The and Cat Pool, The)

 

BULLOCH /BUAILEACH:

“Ox Stall” of “Ox Fold.”  Located at the foot of Glen Fintaig, just into Glen Gloy.

 

BUNARKAIG / BUN AIRCEIG:

“River Mouth or Foot of the River Arkaig.”  A small settlement at the junction of the river Arkaig and Loch Lochy. Just east of Achnacarry.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons as tenants.

 

BUNCAMGHARAIDH / BUNCAMGARRY:

“River Mouth of the Camgharaidh” or “Foot of the Rough Winding Stream.”  A small portion of flat land located at the junction of Allt Camgharaidh and Loch Arkaig, just west of Gerraran.

 

BUNGALOW HILLOCK:

(see: Cnoc nam Faobh)

 

BUN LOY / BUN NA LAOIGH :

“River Mouth or Foot of the River Loy.”  Formerly a small settlement located at the junction of the River Loy and the River Lochy.  An old burial ground was located there (on the north bank, near the junction) and was for generations the resting place of inhabitants of Upper Banavie, Muirshirlich and those from Glen Loy.  In 1927, due to river bank erosion, all of the remains from this burial ground were reinterred at the Strone Burial Ground.  The Bunloy burial ground is therefore non-existent.

 

BUNREE / BUN RIGHE:

“Base of the Ridge.”  Located opposite from Corran, near Loch Linnhe. 

 

BUN ROY / BUN RUAIDH:

 

“River Mouth or Foot of the River Roy.”  Located south of Roy Bridge, near the junction of the Rivers Roy and Spean.

 

 

[Back to Top]

 

C-D

 

 

CADHA NA H-EARBA:

“The Pass of the Roe.”  A large pass or hollow situated approximately 1/3 mile east of Kinlocharkaig, just southeast of Loch Arkaig’s head.

 

CAIG FALLS / CIA-AIG FALLS / CIA’AIG FALLS / EAS CHIABHAIG:

“Spray Waterfall.”  A double waterfall (a drop of approximately 20 feet) at the western end of the Dark Mile, where the River Caig comes dashing down from the high hills north of Achnacarry.  Features a deep pool called the "Witch's Cauldron," which flows under Drochaidh Chiaaig (Caig Bridge) and into Caig Burn.  Legend has it that in the distant past Cameron clansmen chased a witch, in the form of a cat, over the falls here to her death.  A very scenic roadside stop.

(see: Glencaig)

 

CAIG RIVER / CIA’AIG RIVER / CIA-AIG RIVER / AMHAINN CIA-AIG / AMHAINN CHIABHAIG:

Spray River.”  A small mountain river rising in the hills north of the Dark Mile that flows southward and falls into Loch Arkaig, near its foot.

 

CAILLICH / CALLICH / CAILLEACH / CALLI(E)CHARTH / CHAYLLICH / KYLACHIE:

“Whisp of Corn Place,” “Last handful of Standing Corn,” “Husks of Corn” or “Circular Whisp of the Corn-Stack.”  Also possibly meaning “The Old Woman,” possibly connected with "Lubnacallich" (The Bend of the Old Woman).  A small flat or hollow located on the north shore of Loch Arkaig, east of Murlaggan and near Arcabhi.  In the past this site has been a shealing in Lochiel's forest grazings.  Site of the home of the MacMillans of Caillich.  There may also be a similarly named place near the River Lundy.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacMillans and Camerons (“alias MacMillans”) as tenants.  When surveyed in 1772 Caillich consisted of creel houses and the roots of old oak trees lay among the nearby hills, having been harvested, and a mill (built from stone and lime) was situated near Loch Arkaig.

(see: MacMillan)

 

CALADH ARD:

(see: Callart)

 

CALEDONIAN CANAL:

A grand canal, built by Thomas Telford and first opened to nautical traffic in 1822.  It connects the west of Scotland, via Lochs Lochy, Oich and Ness (traversing the entire length of Glenalbyn, The Great Glen) to Inverness, on the east.  Some of the low-lying lands that were farmed by Lochaber families were consumed by the rising waters of the canal, never to be reclaimed.

(also see: Neptune's Staircase)

 

CALEDONIAN FOREST:

(see: An T'seinn Frith)

 

CALLACH:

(see: Caillich)

 

CALLART / CALLAIRD:

"Upper Harbor" or "Hazel Point."  Prior to the Forestry Commission taking possession of this land it was described as “thick with hazel trees,” which may lend credence to the later naming theory.  Located within Kilmalie Parish, in Mamore (in Nether Lochaber) three miles or so east of North Ballachulish, on the northern shore of Loch Leven, just opposite to the entrance to Glencoe.  

 

CALLART, (THE CAMERONS OF):

This family is the first that "branched off the main stem" of Clan Cameron, therefore it is the oldest cadet family of Lochiel.  They are descended from John Cameron, second son of Allan "Mac Dhomh'uill Duibh," twelfth Chief of Clan Cameron, by his wife Mariot MacDonald.  From this family sprung the Camerons of Lundavra, Culchenna, and other cadets.  They were commonly known as "Sliochd Ian 'ic Ailein," or the descendants of John, son of Allan of Lochiel.  The Camerons of Callart followed the banner of Lochiel under Montrose and Dundee, as well as in the Rising of 1745.  The original residence of Cameron of Callart was burned down after an outbreak of plague was brought to the house by a Spanish Trading ship moored in Loch Leven.  A shallow hollow in the field (near an avenue of old trees) is all that remains of the home site.

 

CALLICH / CALLICHARTH:

(see: Caillich)

 

CALLOP / CALPA / CULENAP / KOWILKNAP / CUIL A’ CHNAIP:

“Calf of the Leg” or “At the Back of the Knob-Shaped Hill.”  Located near Glenfinnan.

 

CALMEROUNE:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1605.

 

CALPA:

(see: Callop)

 

CAM A’ CHOIREAN:

(see: Cam Choirein)

 

CAMA DHAIL:

(see: Camnaghael)

 

CAMAGHAEL:

(see: Camnaghael)

 

CAMAGHUID:

Near the River Lochy, north of Caol.

 

CAMAS A’ CHUILINN:

“Bay of the Holly.”  Located on the Ardgour side Loch Linnhe, northeast of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

CAMAS AN INBHIR:

“Bay at the River Mouth.”  Located on the north shore of Loch Eil, at Fassifern, where the An-t Suileag empties into the loch.

 

CAMAS CRUINN:

“Round Bay.”  Located along the north shore of Loch Eil, just east of Achdalieu.

 

CAMAS DUBH UISGE:

Duisky Bay” or “Black Water Bay.”  Located near Duisky, on the south shore of Loch Eil, just east of its junction with An Dubh Uige.

 

CAMAS MHUILLEIR:

“Bay of the Miller?”  Located on the north shore of Loch Eil, near Fassifern.

 

CAMAS NA BIRLINN:

“Bay of the Galley.”  Located near Kilvaodan, in Ardgour.

 

CAMAS NA CILLE:

“Bay of the Church.”  Located along the western shoreline of Loch Linnhe, south of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

CAMASNAGAUL / CAMAS NAN GALL / CAMUS NAN GALL:

(see: Camusnagaul)

 

CAMASNAHA / CAMAS NA H-ATHA:

(see: Camus na h-Atha)

 

CAMAS NA H-EIRBHE / CAMUS NA H-EIRBHE:

(see: Camus na h-Eirighe)

 

CAMBERNON / DeCAMBERNON:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1296.

 

CAM BHEALACH:

“Crooked Pass.”  Located near the Allt Glas Dhiore, northwest of Glaster.  West of Loch Lochy.  

 

CAMBRAWNO:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1402.

 

CAMBRIN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1365.

 

CAMBRO:

A Dane who is said to have acquired his property with the Chiefship of Clan Cameron, by marriage with the daughter and heiress of MacMartin of Letterfinlay; probably a partial myth.

 

CAMBRON / DeCAMBRON:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1233.

 

CAMBRONE:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1351.

 

CAMBROUN / DeCAMBROUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1296.

 

CAMBRUN:

A possible early form of the surname Cameron, a place name in Fife meaning "crooked hill."

 

CAMBURNON / DeCAMBURNON:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1297.

 

CAMBRV' / CAMBRVN:

An early form of the surname Cameron.

 

CAM CHOIREIN / CAM A’ CHOIREAN:

“The Crooked, Small Corry.”  A small corry located on the northeast side of Meall Dubh, south of Cam Bealach.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

CAM DHAIL:

(see: Camnaghael)

 

CAM DHOIRE:

“Crooked Grove/Thicket.”  A small tract of natural wood (in 1875) located at the end of Gleann a’ Cham Dhoire, west of the River Mallie, that extends approximately ¾ mile along Allt a Cham Dhoire. 

(also see: Allt a’ Cham Dhoire)

(also see: Gleann a’ Cham Dhoire)

 

CAM DUBH:

The "King of Cats," cited in early tales from Lochaber.  Said to have once matched wits with Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief at The Field of the Cat.

 

CAMERARIO:

From the Chambers sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CAMERARIUS:

From the Chambers sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CAMERN:

An alternative spelling of the surname Cameron, 1718.

 

CAMERON:

A surname of many supposed origins, Lowland and Highland and foreign.

 

One tradition contends that the name originates from a younger son of the Royal Family of Denmark, who assisted at the restoration of King Fergus II, anointed in 404 A.D.  He was called Cameron or "Cambro" because of his "crooked" nose, as the surname implies.  He supposedly acquired his property in marriage with the daughter and heiress of the MacMartins of Letterfinlay.

In the Highlands the name is thought to be derived from the word "Camshron," Gaelic for "wry"/"hook/crooked nose" or "Cambrun," Gaelic for "crooked hill."

 

It is thought to be of a "territorial" source in the Lowlands, from one of three places: Cameron, near Edinburgh; Cameron in Lennox; Cameron (Cambrun/Camberone), a parish in Fife, Norman for "crooked hill."

(also see: Tartans)

 

CAMERON BRIDGE:

A village in central Fifeshire, on the Leven River, two miles west of Markinch.  Not within Lochaber's Cameron Country.

 

CAMERON BURN:

A stream located in Fife, Scotland.  Not within Lochaber's Cameron Country.

 

CAMERONIANS:

A title, in honor of Scottish covenanting leader Richard Cameron (1648-1680), often applied to all sects or bodies who held advanced or unusual opinions. In particular it used to be given to the "Reformed Presbyterians" that would not accept the settlement of church and state under William and Mary.

PLEASE NOTE: Cameronians were not affiliated with the Camerons of Lochiel or any other branch of the clan.

 

CAMERONITES:

Name sometimes applied to the followers of "The Walking Library," John Cameron (c. 1579-1625).

 

CAMERONNE:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1650.

 

CAMERON SQUARE:

The central square in downtown Fort William, just south of High Street.  Location of the West Highland Museum, established in 1922, and also the Fort William Tourist Information Centre.

 

CAMEROUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1425.

 

CAMEROWN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1446-53.

 

CAMGARRY:

(see: Gleann Camgharaidh)

 

CAMGHOU RAN / CAMGHOURAN:

MacSorlie-Camerons from Glen Nevis originally settled in this area of Rannoch, south of the traditional Clan Cameron Lands.  There was a village of 20-30 Cameron houses here up until the Highland Clearances.

(also see: Stone of the Heads)  

 

CAMGHARAIDH:

(see: Gleann Camgharaidh)

 

CAMISKY, (THE CAMERONS OF):

A branch of the Camerons of Erracht.

 

CAMISKY:

On the River Lochy, north of Torcastle and due east of Muirshirlich.  There was a mansion built here in the mid 19th century by the Lord Abinger.

 

CAMMERON:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1532.

 

CAMNAGHAEL / CAMAGHAEL / CAM DHAIL:

“Crooked Field” OR “Field Bend or Curve.”  A small township located adjacent to the River Lochy, on the fringe of Blar Mor (Corpach Moss) and the junction of the River Lundy.  

 

CAMPBROUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1543-49.

 

CAMPHRON:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1574.

 

CAMPRONE:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1543-49.

 

CAMPROUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1546.

 

CAMRON:

An alternative spelling of the surname Cameron, 1498-1628.

 

CAMRONAICH:

An early adjectival form of the surname Cameron.

 

CAMRONE:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1543-49.

 

CAMROUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1543-49.

 

CAMROWNE:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1485-1552.

 

CAMRUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1598.

 

CAMSHRON:

Possible early form of the surname Cameron, a descriptive adjective meaning "crooked/wry/hook nose."  Contrary to popular belief, the "S" in this word is silent.

 

CAMSROIN:

The middle Gaelic genitive form of the name Cameron.

 

CAMUSERRACHT:

Located near Rannoch.  An offshoot branch of the MacMartins of Letterfinlay resided here for generations.

 

CAMUSINAS:

Near Loch Sunart.

 

CAMUSNAGAUL  / CAMASNAGAUL:

"Bay of the Caol (Narrows)" or “Bay of the (Dark Haired) Strangers.”  A small settlement located on the Ardgour peninsula.  Also the name given to the adjacent sheltered little bay directly across from Fort William, on Loch Linnhe's western shore.  In this bay, on the deck of his galley the Marquis of Argyll is said to have stood and watched the route of his Campbell clansmen by the forces of Montrose, at the Battle of Inverlochy in 1645.

(also see: Caol)

 

CAMUS NA H-ATHA / CAMUSNAHA:

"Bay of the Kiln."  Located where the waters of Loch Eil widen out from the Annat Narrows (to the west) forming a curved shore.  Just beyond this area is where legend has it that a "wizard" warned Donald "The Gentle Lochiel" not to join the 1745 Jacobite Uprising.

 

CAMUS NA H-EIRGHE / CAMUS NA H-EIRBHE / CAMAS NA H-EIRGHE / CAMAS NA H-EIRBHE:

“Bay of the Boundary Wall Between Two Marches.”  Located near Callart in Nether Lochaber, just north of Loch Leven.  Now considered a “lost village” the area was had been occupied since prehistoric times until being abandoned in the early 19th century.  A marked trail leads to the lost village from the B863, on the north shore of Loch Leven.  Once the home to a cadet branch of the MacIntyres.

 

CAMUS TRISLAIG:

"Bay of Trislaig," on Loch Linnhe, near the village of Trislaig.

 

CAOCHAN BAN:

“The White Brook/Burn.”  A mountain stream having its source on the north side of Coire an Tagraidh and flowing in an eastern course until it joins Allt an Fhudeir.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

CAOCHAN DUBHAIG:

“Purling Rill of a Deep Dark Pool.”  Located near Claggan.

 

CAOCHAN MHINEAGAIR:

“The Vinegar Brook/Burn.”  A small stream rising south of Creag Innis nam Bo that flows northeast, falling into Loch Lochy just southeast of St. Ciaran’s Church.  Water flowing from peat bogs and slow draining areas containing peat is often cool and clean, but has the color of tea and tastes like vinegar, from the decaying organic materials upstream.  This may be the origin of the placename.

 

CAOCHAN RUADH:

“Red Rivulet.”  A small stream rising in the south of Tom a’ Bharraich that falls into the River Loy near Beul ath Ruadh and Drochaid Inverskilavulin.

 

CAOL / CAOL-NA-CORPAICH:

Sea Narrows.”  A village and township where Loch Linnhe narrows, near the River Lochy, Caledonian Canal and Fort William.

(also see: An Caol)

 

CAOLAS MHIC PHATRIC / CAOLAS MHIC PHADRUIG:

(see: MacPatrick's / MacPeter’s Narrows)

 

CAOL LAIRIG:

"The Narrow Pass."  Just west of Glen Roy, near Bohuntine.

 

CAONICH / CAONAICH / CUINICH / COINICH / COINNICH:

“Mossy Place.”  Located on the northern shore of Loch Arkaig, west of Culcairn’s Brae.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons and MacPhees as tenants.  When surveyed in 1772 Caonich consisted of farm houses, and its steep, rugged hillsides were not suitable for cattle, but rather sheep and goats.  The gravelly soil was fertilized by tathing (confining livestock to manure the land) and laying fern fronds.  It was then sown with oats and corn.

 

CARN A’ CHAISTEIL / CARN CHAISTEIL:

“Cairn of the Hill Fort” or “Castle Rock.”  A “precipitous rock” on the north side of Mullach Coire nan Gearran.  The dividing point (high ground) between Ruighe Mor and Gerraran.

 

CARNAIS / CAIRINNIS:

“Kari’s Cape.”  Located near North Ballachulish and east of the ferry.  A farm at this location was previously tenanted by Ewen MacMillan, foster brother of Colonel John Cameron of Fassiefern.  The placename, Norse in origin, points to an early Scadinavian settlement in the area.

 

CARN BEAG DEARG:

“The Small Red Cairn” or “Little Red Rocky Mountain.”  The mountain which flanks the Allt a'Mhuillin glen on the northeast, northeast of Carn Dearg.  

 

CARN DEARG:

Meaning “Red-Brown Hill,” “Red Cairn” or “Red Rocky Mountain.”  There are two similarly named “outlier shoulders” of Ben Nevis.  One is the northern face of the main mass of Ben Nevis and the other is the southern outlier and lies above Polldubh and Acharaich in Glen Nevis.

(also see: Coire Eoghainn)

 

CARN DEARG MEANDHONACH:

“Middle Red Rocky Mountain.”  Located northeast of Carn Dearg. 

 

CARN DUBH:

“The Black Cairn.”  A conical hill on the historic boundary between the parishes of Killmallie and Kilmonivaig, and east of Lochan an Fhithich.  North of Loch Arkaig.

 

CARN MOR:

“Big Cairn.”  A small rocky and stony hill located between Coire an Eich and Coire na Gaoithe ‘n Ear.

 

CARN MOR DEARG:

“Big Red Peak” or “Big Rocky Mountain.”  Located roughly between Ben Nevis and Aonach Mor, slightly to the north.

 

CARN PHAIL:

“Paul’s Grave.”  A small elevated knoll with a few fir trees (in 1875) used by a burying place by Camerons.  Located just south of Strone, near the bank of the Caledonian Canal.

 

"CASTLE COMMANDO":

The name associated with Achnacarry, residence to the Camerons of Lochiel, in reference to its capacity as a commando training site during World War Two. As many as 25,000 English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Belgian, American, Dutch and Norwegian soldiers would undergo "commando basic training" here, beginning in February 1942. Officially Achnacarry would function as the "Commando Depot" and later as the "Commando Basic Training Center."  It was officially disbanded on March 31, 1946.

 

Commandos also utilized Inverailort House, as a special training school and depot.

 

CAT FIELD, (THE):

(see: Field of the Cat, The)

 

CATHAR RUADH:

“Rough, Broken Red Ground” or “Red Moor.”  A piece of moor ground located northeast of Erracht and northwest of Moy.

 

CAT POOL, (THE) / BUINN’ A’ CHAIT:

Just before the Cat Rapids, located below the cliffs of Torcastle.  Legend has it that on the advice of Gormshuil, the Witch of Moy, Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, slowly roasted a stray Lochaber cat to learn his penance for past "indiscretions."  Soon the "King of Cats," Cam Dubh, arrived and agreed to tell Ewen his penance if he released the smoldering cat.  When the cat was freed, it was said to have sprinted to the cliffs near Torcastle and leapt into the River Lochy.  Thus the Cat Pool and the Cat Rapids just beyond.

(also see: Field of the Cat, The)

 

CAT RAPIDS, (THE):

Just beyond the Cat Pool, which is located below the cliffs of Torcastle.  Legend has it that on the advice of Gormshuil, the Witch of Moy, Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, slowly roasted a stray Lochaber cat to learn his penance for past "indiscretions."  Soon the "King of Cats," Cam Dubh, arrived and agreed to tell Ewen his penance if he released the smoldering cat.  When the cat was freed, it was said to have sprinted to the cliffs near Torcastle and leapt into the River Lochy.  Thus the Cat Pool and the Cat Rapids just beyond.

(also see: Field of the Cat, The)

 

CAUMBEREN / DeCAUMBEREN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1286.

 

CAUMBROUN / DeCAUMBROUN:

A form of the surname Cameron, circa 1297.

 

CEANNA BREAC:

“The Mottled Head.”  A rocky side of a hill above and east of Kinbreak House, in Glen Kingie.

 

CEANN A' CHLAIR:

"Head/End of the Flat Area."  Located at the west end of Camus na H-atha, just beyond Blar na H-annait.  In the past this was a popular site for bark to be stripped from trees for local tanneries.

 

CEANN A' MHUIR:

(see: Kenmore)

 

CEANN BHREAC:

(see: Kinbreack)

 

CEANN CAOL:

“Narrow Headland.”  Located south of Loch Eil and west of Loch Linnhe.  

 

CEANN LOCH AIRCEIG:

(see: Kinlocharkaig)

 

CEANN LOCH EIL / CEANN LOCH IALL(IAL):

(see: Kinlocheil)

 

CEANN LOCH CUAICH:

(see: Kinlochquoich)

 

CEANN NA DROCHAIT MHOR/MOIRE:

"The End of the Great Bridge"/"The Head of the High Bridge," a "gathering" piobaireachdan said to be a Cameron composition and favorite.

 

CEAPACH:

(see: Keppoch)

 

CEAPANACH:

(see: Keppanach)

 

CHALMERS:

From the Chambers sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CHAMBERS / CHAMBRES:

A major sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CHAYLLICH:

(see: Caillich)

 

CHINGIDH:

(see: Kingie)

 

CHLANNA NAN CON THIGIBH A SO'S GHEIBH SIBH FEOIL:

The war cry of Clan Cameron. "Sons of the hounds come hither/here and get flesh/meat."

 

CHLIANAIG / CHLINAIG / CLAONAIG / CHLAOINAIG:

“Small Declevity,” “Small Slope” or “Small Waterfall.”   A small settlement named for its proximity to a local waterfall (Eas Chlianaig or Chlianaig Falls).  Located just south of the River Spean and southeast of Roybridge.  It is said that at this place the last fairies in Lochaber were seen, by a man named MacKenzie.

 

CHLIANAIG FALLS / EAS CHLIANAIG / EAS CHLAOINAIG:

Located on the River Spean, east of Bunroy.  An associated settlement of the past took its name from these falls. 

 

CIA-AIG RIVER / CIA’AIG RIVER:

(see: Caig River)

 

CILL CHOIREIL:

(see: Kilachoireil)

 

CILL-CHONAID:

(see: Killiechonate)

 

CILL-EALAIG:

(see: Kilellie)

 

CILLE CHUMAIN:

(see: Fort William)

 

CILLE MHAODAIN:

An old burial ground located approximately one mile north of the Corran Narrows, at the foot of a hillside.  The Maclean of Ardgour chiefs and their families are buried in this place, as well as some residents from Coruanan, across Loch Linnhe.

 

CILL MAOLAIN:

(see: Kilmallie)

 

CILL MHAILLIDH:

(see: Kilmallie)

 

CILL-MO-NAOMHAIG:

(see: Kilmonivaig)

 

CIOCH INNIS / CIOCHNIS:

(see: Kiachnish River)

 

CISTEACHAN DUBHA:

‘The Black Chists.”  A rocky portion of moorland northeast of Leac Chorrach.  Formerly (in 1875) the “resort of foxes” (refuge, habitual place of).  West of Loch Lochy.

 

CLACH A' CHARRA:

A standing stone located in the shore fields at Onich.  Approximately seven feet in height and four in width, the stone has unique circular holes in a natural stone hollow.

 

CLACH-AN-TURRAMAIN:

“Stone of the Rocking,” or “Rocking Stone.”  Located in Glen Nevis, near the former location of Dun Dige.  Formerly this large, carefully balanced stone could be set rocking with the gentlest of pushes.  Now the stone is set firmly in place, due to debris and weeds settling in at its base.

 

CLACH FEADAIG:

“Whistling Rock” or “Stone of the Whistle.”  A small rock (presumably prone to producing a whistling noise from the wind) located on the south shore of Loch Arkaig, almost directly south across the loch from Murlaggan (but slightly to the west).

 

CLACH NA CEANN:

(see: Stone of the Heads)

 

CLACH NA MEINEIR:

“Stone of the Mine.”  A large boulder located approximately one mile northeast of Sgor na Fhuaran.

 

CLACH NAN CEANN:

(see: Stone of the Heads)

 

CLACH PHARUIG / CLACH PHADRUIG:

“Patrick's Stone” or “Peter’s Stone” (translations vary).  Said to have been named for a Norse pirate who managed to grab this stone to save his life when his boat overturned in the Corran Narrows.  Another story relates that a past Lochiel was returning on horseback from a wedding along the south side of Loch Leven.  He is said to have been pursued by a witch, or hag, whom he could not “shake.”  On reaching the Ballachulish ferry, Lochiel managed to get into the boat and push-off before the witch could catch him.  Legend states that a “supernatural witch cannot cross water,” so she stood on the shore and “screeched her imprecations” on Lochiel so vehemently that this boulder split apart.

(also see: MacPatrick's Narrows)

 

CLACH SHOMHAIRLE:

There appears to be two such named stones:

(see: Stone of Somerled)

(see: Samuel's Stone)

 

CLACK AN ACRAIS:

“Stone of Hunger.”  A hill-top stone that some Lochaber residents consulted as a natural “time teller.”  They would know when it was meal time by the position of the sun with respect to the stone. 

 

CLACKFERN / A’ GHLAC FHEARNA:

“The Alder Hollow.”  A large hollow located in Glen Dessery, west of Loch Arkaig and north of Monadh Gorm.  At one time considered a part of the Glen Dessery lands, on the Lochiel Estate.

 

CLADHA TOM AN TIGHE MHOIR:

“The Big House Burying Ground.”  Applies to two small, enclosed burying grounds (cemeteries) located approximately ¼ mile west of Clunes.  Both situated on a small wooded hill, at its sumit.  Seperated by only about 100 feet, the higher cemetery consists primarily of Camerons and the lower cemetery of Kennedys.  Although difficult to access, the cemeteries have seen use in recent decades, and have stones dating back at least two centuries.  It is said that a number of Camerons sought shelter in the Cameron burying ground here, following eviction from their crofts in the early nineteenth century.  Collectively, these cemeteries are also known as “Clunes Cemetery.” 

 

CLADH BUN NA LAOIGH:

“Bun Loy Burial Ground.”  A small unenclosed burial place located between the Caledonian Canal and the River Lochy, at the foot of the River Loy.

 

CLADH GIORSAIL:

“Grace’s Graveyard.”  A small unenclosed burying place, located south of Loch na Caraidh (Loch of Achnacarry or “Lochnacarry” – the small indentation in the River Arkaig approximately ¼ mile east of Achnacarry Castle) and south of Achnacarry’s “Garden Road.”

 

CLADH MUCOMIN:

"Mucomir Burial Ground."  In actuality, this is the burial ground at Gairlochy, but for some reason the name has been attributed in error to Mucomir, which is quite nearby.  On the road to Achnacarry, between Spean Bridge and the Caledonian Canal at Gairlochy.  A familiar landmark to anyone making a visit to Achnacarry.

 

CLAGGAN / CLAIGIONN / AUCHLAGAN / ACHADH LAGAIN:

“Skull Shaped Hill” (a hilly portion of land near the old Market Stance fits this description) or “Field of the Hollow” (the B.A. Sporting Ground fits this description).  In early records the area was known as Auchlagan, though the Claggan name is traditional.  A small community located near the foot or entrance to Glen Nevis, north of the River Nevis. 

 

CLAGGAN, WATERFALL OF THE:

(see: Roaring Mill)

 

CLAIGIONN / CLAIGGIN:

(see: Claggan)

 

CLAIGIONN NA SROINE:

“Skull of the Projection.”  An elevated hill located approximately three miles west of Strone and approximately four miles northeast of Corpach.

 

CLAONAIG:

(see: Chlianaig)

 

CLARK / CLARKE:

A major sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CLARKSON:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CLEARY:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CLERK:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

CLUANAIS:

(see: Clunes)

 

CLUNES / CLUANAIS / NA CLUAINEAN:

“The Meadow,” "Meadow Stance," "Pasture Resting-Place," “Upland Fields” or "Pleasant Place."  Near the southern end of Loch Lochy, on the Northwest shore.  On the isthmus close to Achnacarry.  Just to the north the Dark Mile begins and heads west toward Loch Arkaig.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.

 

CLUNES, (THE CAMERONS OF):

A branch of the Camerons of Erracht.  The original Clunes House was burned to the ground following the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion, and the present-day residence was built shortly afterwards.  On a small knoll at the back of the house is the burial place of the Camerons of Clunes.  The lease for these lands ended in 1850 and the Camerons of Clunes spread throughout Scotland and the world.

 

CLUNES FOREST:

Along the southwest shore of Loch Lochy, extending northeast from Clunes.

 

CNOCAN A’ BHUACHAILLE:

“Small Hillock of the Herdsmen.”  Located just northeast of Achintee.

 

CNOCHAN NA CAIRIDH:

“Knoll of the Weir.”  A small knoll planted in fir (in 1875) located at the south end of Loch Lochy.

 

CNOCAN NA MI CHOMHAIRLE:

(see: Cnoc na mi Chomhairle)

 

CNOC NAM FAOBH:

“Hillock of the Spoil or Booty,” also known as “Bungalow Hillock” since the late 19th century.  Rises on the north side of the road to Glenfinnan (A-830), opposite the main entrance to the Corpach pulp mill, about one-quarter mile west of the Kilmallie Parish church.  

 

CNOC NA MI CHOMHAIRLE:

"Knoll/Mound of Evil Counsel."  A hillock near Dun Dige, in Glen Nevis where a MacSorlie/Cameron of Glen Nevis chieftain insulted the honor of a body of men from Clan Chattan (Mackintosh) by having his piper play a traditional Cameron song ("Sons of the Hound") as their send-off tune following a visit.  The Chattans stopped at this hillock and took counsel, with the decision being reached that they would return and ambush the MacSorlies/Camerons.  Their resulting attack killed or wounded every man, woman and child.  The infant son of the chieftain survived, thanks to the quick thinking of a trusted clansperson, who hid the child for years, only to return with a grown lad and an engraved silver spoon to prove his birthright some years later.

 

COILLE ACHADH NAN SABHAL:

“Achnasaul Woods” or “Wood of the Field of the Barns.”  A wood on the north side of Loch Arkaig, running from Achnasaul to the foot of the loch, near the River Caig.

 

COILLE A CHAM UISGE:

“Woods of the Crooked Water.”  Located east of the River Lochy, southeast of Camisky.

 

COILLE A’ GHIUBHAIS:

(see: Guisach)

 

COILLE AN ROISE:

(see: Coilleros)

 

COILLE AN RUIGHE MHOIR:

“Woods of the Great Sheiling” or “Woods of the Big Hill Slope.”  A piece of “natural grown wood” (in 1875) located near the western end of Glen Mallie, just north of the River Mallie and west of its junction with Allt a’ Cham Dhoire.  Just northeast of Ruighe Mhoir.  

 

COILLE DIOMHAIN:

 

“Idle Wood.” Located near old Keppoch, in Glen Spean.  Reputed to have been named after a legendary character by the name of Diaman.

 

COILLE MHOR:

“Large Wood.”  The name of both a peak and the associated old woodlands surrounding it, located northeast of Fassifern.  The peak is within the Druim Fada ridgeline.

 

COILLE NA DUBH CHLAISE:

“Wood of the Black Hollow.”  A “considerable extent of copse wood” (in 1875) located west of Erracht, on the south side of Glen Loy.

 

COILLE NA GUIBHSAICH:

(see: Guisach)

 

COILLE NAN GEUR-OIREAN:

(see: Gerraran)

 

COILLE PUITEACHAIN:

“Wood of the Swelling Knoll.”  A wood located just southeast of Puiteachain.

 

COILLEROS / COILLE-ROS / COILLE RAIS / COILLE AN ROISE / KILLIROSS / KYLINROSS / CUILIONN-ROS:

“Rising Wood” or “Wood Point.”  Also known in the past as Kylinross or Cuilionn-ros, “Holly Point.”  A “piece of mixed wood” (in 1875) along the western shore of Loch Lochy, between Bunarkaig and Heatherlea.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons as tenants.  Also a place south of Spean Bridge, near Leanachan.

 

COILLEROS / COILLE-ROS / COILLE RAIS / COILLE AN ROISE / KILLIROSS / KYLE ROSE / KYLINROSS:

“Rising Wood” or “Wood Point.”  Located near Leanachan, south of Spean Bridge.  Also a place along the western shore of Loch Lochy.

 

COINICH / COINNICH:

(see: Caonich)

 

COINNEACHAN:

(see: Coneachan)

 

COIR’ A’ BHALACHAIN:

“The Corry of the Cowherd.”  A hollow feature located on the east side of Meall a’ Bhlair.

 

COIR’ A’ CHAISIL:

(see: Corriechassle)

 

COIR’ A’ CHAORACHAIN:

(see: Corrychurachan)

 

COIR’ A’ CHOINGLIGH:

(see: Corrychoille)

 

COIR’ A’ CHREACHAINN:

(see: Corrychurachan)

 

COIRE A’ BHOGANAICH:

A small corry extending in a southwest direction from Glen Derrary.  Approximately ½ mile east of Coire an Eich.

 

COIRE A’ CHAORAINN:

“Corrie of the Rowan Trees.”  Located south of Loch Arkaig and south of Gaor Bheinn/Gulvain (Upper).

 

COIRE A’ CHAORUINN:

“Corry of the Rowan.”  Extends from the north slope of Streap towards the southwest extremity of Gleann a’ Chaoruinn.

 

COIRE A’ MHUILINN:

“Corrie of the Mill.”  Located in Nether Lochaber, just west of Mullach nan Coirean and southwest of Blarachaoran.  Also a place located northeast of Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe.

(also see: Coire Mhuilinn)

 

COIRE A’ MHUILINN:

“Corrie of the Mill.”  Located northeast of Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe.  The associated stream, Allt a’ Mhuilinn, runs northand west, emptying into the River Lochy just north of the Lochy Bridge at Lochyside.  Also a place located southwest of Blarachaoran

(also see: Coire Mhuilinn)

 

COIRE AN EICH:

“Horse Corry.”  A hollow located northeast of Carn Mor, north of Loch Arkaig’s head.

 

COIRE AN LOCHAIN:

“Coire of the Little Loch.”  Located northeast of Aonach Mor.  Also a place in the Memore Forest, north of Loch Eilde Mor and another in Glen Nevis, south of Acharaich.

 

COIRE AN LOCHAIN:

“Coire of the Little Loch.”  Located in the Mamore Forest, north of Loch Eilde Mor.  There is also a smaller lochan by this same name, a few miles west, in Glen Nevis.  Also a place northeast of Aonach Mor and another located in Glen Nevis, south of Acharaich. 

 

COIRE AN LOCHAIN:

“Coire of the Little Loch.”  Located in Glen Nevis, due south of Acharaich.  There is also a larger loch, by this same name, a few miles east, north of Loch Eilde Mor.  Also a place located northeast of Aonach mor and another in the Memore Forest, north of Loch Eilde Mor. 

 

COIRE AN RUIGHE MHOIR:

“Hollow of the Large Plain” or “Hollow of the Shieling.”  A circular hollow located on the southeast side of the hill, Mullach Coire nan Gearran, somewhat near the River Mallie.

 

COIRE AN TAGRAIDH / COIRE AN T-SAGAIRT:

“The Corry of Dispution.”  A hollow feature, located on the south side of Meall an h-Eilde.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

COIRE AN T-SAGAIRT:

(see: Coire an Tagraidh)

 

COIRE AN T-SEILICH:

“Corry of the Willow.”  A small corry, located on the west side of Meall a’ Choire Ghlasi.  West of Loch Lochy.  Also a place north of Achavady, in Glen Roy.

 

COIRE AN T-SEILICH:

“Corry of the Willow.”  A small corry, located north of Achavady, in Glen Roy.  Also a place west of Loch Lochy.

 

COIRE BAN / CORRIE BHAN:

“White Corry.”  A large hollow located just southwest of Meall Coire Lochain, at the head of Allt Bhan and on the east side of Ruighe na Boinne.  North of Clunes.

 

COIRE BEAG:

(see: Corrybeg)

 

COIRE BHAN:

(see: Coire Ban)

 

COIRE BHEITHICH:

“The Corry of the Birch.”  A hollow feature located about ¼ mile northeast of Lochan Dubh.

 

COIRE BHOTRAIS / COIRE BHUTARRAIS:

“The Hollow of the Miry Holes” (if the name is in fact Coire Bhotrais) or “Corrie of Confusion (if the name is Coire Bhutarrais).  A large rocky hollow located just northwest of Beinn Bhan, south of An t’Seann Fhrith.

 

COIRE BHUTARRAIS:

(see: Coire Bhotrais)

 

COIRE BOTH-CHASGAIDH:

(see: Bohasky)

 

COIRE BUIDHE:

“Golden Corrie.”  Located southwest of Loch Quoich.

 

COIRE CARACH:

“Winding Corrie.”  Located in Nether Lochaber, just south of Mullach nan Coirean.

 

COIRE CEIRSLE:

“Clew Shaped Corrie.”  Located due north of Inverroy.

 

COIRE CEIRSLE HILL:

“Hill of the Clew Shaped Corrie.”  Located due north of Inverroy, roughly between Glen Fintage and Glen Collarig.

 

COIRE CHAORACHAN:

(see: Corrychurachan)

 

COIRE CHEANNA MHUIR:

“Hollow of the Head of the Loch or Sea.”  A hollow feature where Allt Mhuic rises, situated just east of Meall Lochan nan Dubh Lochan.

 

COIRE CHICHEANAIS:

A large hollow located to the northwest of Glendessery.

 

COIRE CHNAMH:

“Bonfire Corrie” or “Bone Hollow.”  A “heathy hollow” located somewhat between the summits of Monadh Beag and Beinn Bhan.

 

COIRE CHOILLE-RAIS / COIRE COILLE ROIS:

“Rising Wood Corrie” or “Hollow of the Wood on the Point.”  A long narrow hollow located along with Allt Coire Choille-rais, which runs from near Monadh Beag down toward Loch Lochy, between Bunarkaig and Heatherlea.

 

COIRE CHRAOIBHE / COIRE CRAOIBHE:

“Tree Corrie.”  A “healthy hollow of considerable extent” formed along Allt Coire Chraoibhe as it heads west past Easter and Wester Moy toward Monadh Beag.  Along with Allt Coire Chraoibhe, it is the historic dividing line between Easter and Wester Moy.

 

COIRE CHURRACHAN / COIRECHURACHAN:

(see: Corry Churachan)

 

COIRE COILLE ARD:

“High Wooded Corrie.”  Located south of the River Cona, in Cona Glen, near its head.

 

COIRE COILLE IOSAL:

“Low Wooded Corrie.”  Located south of the River Cona, in Cona Glen, near its head.

 

COIRE COILLE ROIS:

(see: Coire Choille-rais)

 

COIRE CRAOIBHE:

(see: Coire Chraoibhe)

 

COIRE CUL NA CREAG DUBH / COIRE CUL NA CREIGE DUIBHE:

“Backland Corrie of the Dark Rock.”  Located southeast of Torlundy, near the Allt na Caillich. 

 

COIRE DEARG:

“Red Corrie.”  Located in Nether Lochaber, just east of Mullach nan Coirean.

 

COIRE DUBH:

“Dark Corrie.”  Located just northeast of Beinn Bhan.  Also a location just southeast of Glen Gloy’s Upper Glenfintaig, north of Lundavra, northeast of Achintee and south of Blaich.

 

COIRE DUBH:

“Dark Corrie” or “Black Hollow.”  A rocky hollow located just southeast of Glen Gloy’s Upper Glenfintaig.  Also a location just northeast of Beinn Bhan, north of Lundavra, northeast of Achintee and south of Blaich.

 

COIRE DUBH:

“Dark Corrie.”  Located north of Lundavra, near Meall nan Cleireach.  Also a location just northeast of Beinn Bhan, southeast of Upper Glenfintaig, northeast of Achintee and south of Blaich.

 

COIRE DUBH:

“Dark Corrie.”  Located northeast of Achintee, north of Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe.  Also a location just northeast of Beinn Bhan, southeast of Upper Glenfintaig, north of Lundavra and south of Blaich.

 

COIRE DUBH:

“Dark Corrie.”  Located in Ardgour, due west of Fort William and generally south of Blaich.  Also a location just northeast of Beinn Bhan, southeast of Upper Glenfintaig, north of Lundavra and northeast of Achintee.

 

COIRE DUBH NA GIUBHSAICH (GUISACH) / COIRE DUBH A’ GHIUBHAIS (GUISACH) /:

“Dark Corrie of Guisach” or “Black Hollow of the Firs.”  A hollow located on the north side of the hill Druim a’ Ghiubhais, off the southwestern edge of Guisach (The Pine Forest).

 

COIRE EOGHAINN:

Bounds the summit plateau to Carn Dearg S.W.  Some mountaineers make their way up the steep slopes beside the waterslide into the corrie and then go north-east to ultimately go up the boulder-strewn slopes to the summit of Ben Nevis.

 

COIRE FADA:

“The Long Hollow.”  A mountain feature located on the north side of Druim Fada, south of the head of Glen Loy.

 

COIRE FEARNA:

“Alderwood Corrie.”  Located north of Kinlochiel, north of Loch Eil’s northern shore.

 

COIRE GABHALACH / COIRE GHABHAIL:

“Corrie of the Lease.”  Located west of Binnean Beag and Binnean Mor, in the Mamores.

 

COIRE GARBH:

“The Rough Corry.”  A small hollow located at the head of Coire Glas, north of Loch Arkaig.

 

COIRE GHABHAIL:

(see: Coire Gabhalach)

 

COIRE GLAS:

“Green or Grey Corrie/Hollow.”  An extensive hollow in the hill located off the southwestern edge of Guisach (The Pine Forest), south of Loch Arkaig.  Also a place located on the east side of Meall a’ Choire Ghlais, west of Loch Lochy.

 

COIRE GLAS:

“Green or Grey Corrie.”  A large corry, shaped like a horseshoe, located on the east side of Meall a’ Choire Ghlais, north of Loch Arkaig.  Also a place located near Guisach, south of Loch Arkaig.

 

COIRE GORM:

“Green or Blue Corrie.”  A small corrie located south of Lagganfern and Kinlocharkaig, a short distance east of the source of Allt na Fainf.  Also a place located in Ardgour, toward the head of Cona Glen.

 

COIRE GORM:

“Green or Blue Corrie.”  Located in Ardgour, toward the head of Cona Glen.  Also a place located south of Lagganfern and Kinlocharkaig.

 

COIRE GIUBHAIS / COIRE GIUBHSACHAIN:

“Fir Corrie.”  Located between Aonach Beag and Carn Mor Dearg.

 

COIRE IONNDRAINN:

“Missing Corrie.”  Located near the head of Glen Collarig, west of Achavady. 

 

COIRE LEACACH:

“Stony Corrie” or “Flaggy Corrie.”  A hollow feature located on the east side of Meall na Tanga, just southwest of Meall Dubh.  North of the Clunes Forest and west of Loch Lochy.  Also a place south of Loch Arkaig, east of Gaor Bheinn/Gulvain (Upper).

 

COIRE LEACACH:

“Stony Corrie” or “Flag Hollow.”  Located south of Loch Arkaig and east of Gaor Bheinn/Gulvain (Upper).  Also a place just south of Meall Dubh.

 

COIRE LEATHANN:

“Slender Corrie.”  Located at the head of Allt an Amair, between Coruanan and Lundavra.

 

COIRE LIATH:

“Grey Hollow.”  A very large hollow located southeast of Loch Quoich, on the west side of Scour Gairich.  In 1875 this place was the property of Cameron of Lochiel.

 

COIRE LOCHAIN:

“Corry of the Small Loch.”  A small hollow and lochan portion of moor-land through which Allt an Fhaing flows.  Just east of Meall Coire Lochain.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

COIRE LOCH BLAIR / COIRE LOCH A’ BHLAIR:

“Corrie of the Loch of the Flat.”  Extends from the south base of Meall an Dhoire Dhuinn about one mile eastward toward Loch Blair.   

 

COIRE MHIC EOGHAIN OIG:

“The Corry of Young Ewen’s Son.”  A large corry located about 1/3 mile northeast of Mai (sp?)

 

COIRE MHUIC:

A deep ravine and large corrie located south of Sgor Chromich through which a stream of the same name flows.  It is approximately one mile long, by about ½ mile in width.  North of Loch Arkaig.

 

COIRE MHUILLIN:

“Mill Corrie” or “Hollow of the Mill.”  A mountain feature located just south of Beinn Bhan (the one closest to Achnacarry), along Allt Coire Mhuillin.  North of Inverskilavulin.

(also see: Coire a’ Mhuilinn)

 

COIRE MHUSGAIN:

“Corrie of the Rotten Trees.”  Located between Stob Ban and Sgurr a’ Mhaim, in the Memores.  

 

COIRE MUICK:

(see: Coire Mhuic)

 

COIRE NA CISTE:

“Corrie of the Box / Chest.”  Located between the summits of Ben Nevis and Carn Dearg.

 

COIRE NA CLOICHE BIGE:

“Corrie of the Small Rock?”  Located north of the western end of Loch Arkaig, northeast of Meallan Dubh – south of Coire na Cloiche Moire. 

 

COIRE NA CLOICHE MOIRE:

“Corrie of the Large Rock?”  Located north of the western end of Loch Arkaig, northeast of Meallan Dubh  – north of Coire na Cloiche Bige. 

 

COIRE NA COSAIG:

“The Hollow of the Little Nook.”  A small mountain hollow on the northern face of Glas Bheinn.  North of the foot of Loch Arkaig.

 

COIRE NA GALL:

“Hollow of the Lowlanders.”  A large mountain hollow located approximately ½ mile south of Loan.  This land was the joint property of Cameron of Lochiel and Mr. Baird of Gartsherrie, in 1875.

 

COIRE NA H-AIRE:

“Corry of the Watch” or “Hollow of the Watching.”  A very rocky hollow located one mile east of Coire Screamhach, and generally south of Gerraran.

 

COIRE NA H-IOLAIRE:

“The Eagle’s Corry/Corry.”  A small hollow located south of the River Mallie and Allt Cam Dhoire, on the northern slope of Druim Gleann Laoigh, at the southern end of Allt Coire na h-Iolaire.

 

COIRE NAM BO:

“Corrie of the Cow.”  Located northeast of Stronenaba.

 

COIRE NAM FUARAN / COIRE NAN FUARAN:

“Corry of the Spring” or “Hollow of the Spring.”  A small hollow on the north side of Glen Mallie, north of the River Mallie, at the beginning of Allt an Ruighe Mhoir.  Also a hollow located in the west end of Glen Loy, north of the River Loy.

 

COIRE NAM FUARAN / COIRE NAN FUARAN:

“Corry of the Spring” or “Hollow of the Spring.”  A hollow located toward the west end of Glen Loy, north of the River Loy.  Also a hollow on the north side of Glen Mallie, north of the River Mallie.

 

COIRE NAN CNAMH:

“Corrie of the Bone.”  Located between An Steall (Upper Falls of Nevis) and Sgor (Sgurr) a’ Mhaim.

 

COIRE NAN EUN:

“Corrie of the Birds.”  Located south of Beinn Iaruinn, due west of Bruniachan.

 

COIRE NAN GALL:

"Corry of the Stranger."  A corry at the head of Glenkingie where Prince Charles Edward Stuart once hid from Hanoverian troops following the Battle of Culloden.

 

COIRE NAN GALL:

“Corry of the Stranger.”  A large corry located approximately one mile southwest of Glen Pean.

 

COIRE NAN GEUR-OIREAN / GERRARAN:

“Coire of the Gerraran.”  Located southeast of Gerraran, north of the River Mallie.

 

COIRE NAN LAOGH:

“The Calves’ Corry.”  A small corry located on the west side of Meall a’ Choire Ghlais, approximately one mile south of Coire an t-Seilich.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

COIRE NAN UGH:

(see: Coire nan Uth)

 

COIRE NAN UTH:

“Corry of Udders.”  A large corry located approximately 1/3 mile east of Sgor nan Coireachan.  This placename may have been originally called Coire nan Ugh – Corrie of the Eggs.

 

COIRE NAN LOTHAN:

Located north of Loch Eilde Mor/Moire.

 

COIRE NEURLAIN / COIRE NIOR-LAN:

“Never Full or Overflowing Corrie.”  Located north of Beinn Iaruinn.

 

COIRE ODHAR:

“Dun Hollow.”  A mountain feature located just to the north of Stob a’ Ghrianain, between Glen Loy and Glen Laragain.

 

COIRE ODHAR BHEAG:

“The Small Dun/Corry.”  A deep corry, located between Meall an Tanga and Coire Odhar Mor.  North of the Clunes Forest.

 

COIRE ODHAR MOR:

“The Large Dun/Corry.”  A deep corry, located a short distance west of Coire Odhar Beag, north of the Clunes Forest.

 

COIRE ONFHAIDH:

“Corrie of the Storm.”  Located between Leac na Buidheig and Fraoch Mor, south of Allt Camgharaidh, in Gleann Camgharaidh.

 

COIRE REIDH:

“Smooth Corrie.”  Located southwest of Loch Quoich.

 

COIRE RIABHACH:

“Brindled Corrie.”  Loctaed southwest of Acharaich.

 

COIRE SCREAMHACH:

“Screaming Corrie” or “Horrible Hollow.”  A long and very rocky hollow located roughly between the heads of Loch Arkaig and Glen Mallie, northeast of Gaor Bheinn/Gulvain (Upper).

 

COIRE STOCHDNAICH / COIRE STOCAINNICH:

“Corrie for Wearing Stockings.”  Located northwest of Achavady in Glen Roy. 

 

COIRE UAINEAN BEAG:

“Small Green Corrie?”  Located just east of Loch Linnhe, south of Coruanan.

 

COIRE UAINEAN MOR:

“Large Green Corrie?”  Located east of Loch Linnhe, southeast of Coruanan.

 

COIRE UANAN:

(see: Coruanan)

 

COIR’ UANAIN:

(see: Coruanan)

 

COLUMB(A), ISLAND OF:

(see: Eilean Loch Arkaig)

 

COLUMBKILL, ISLAND:

(see: Eilean Loch Arkaig)

 

COMHNARD A’ GHIUBHAIS:

“Plain of Guisach” or “The Fir Flat.”  An extensive flat piece of “healthy pasture” (in 1875) located off the southern edge of Guisach (The Pine Forest), near Mullach na Briobaig.

 

COMHNARD COIRE NAN GEUR-OIREAN / COMHNARD COIRE NAN GERRARAN / COMHNARD A’ GHEARR CHOIREAN MHOR:

“Plain Coire of the Gerraran” or “Flat of the Large Short Hollows” (translations vary).  A portion of ground, partly level and partly sloping, which is “very rocky.”  Located just south of Gerraran and Loch Arkaig.

 

COMMANDO(S):

(see: Castle Commando)

(also see: Commando Memorial)

 

COMMANDO MEMORIAL:

An impressive monument unveiled on September 27, 1952 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother.  Located on a hill approximately one mile northwest of Spean Bridge, Inverness-shire (at the intersection of the Gairlochy-Inverness-Fort William roads), commanding a wonderful view of the valley of the River Spean, Ben Nevis and the west end of the Great Glen.  The memorial was dedicated to the memory of the 25,000 Allied commandos who trained at Achnacarry during World War Two.  "Three Men on the Hill" has three gigantic bronze figures of commando soldiers, in cap comforters and S.V. climbing boots "facing up to the elements."  It was designed by Scott Sutherland, A.R.S.A., of the Dundee Art School.

(also see: Castle Commando)

 

CONA GLEN / CONGHLEANN / CONGLEANN:

“Glen Which Joins” (branches off from Glen Scaddle, just west of Inverscaddle).  Runs to the northwest, into Ardgour and toward Loch Shiel.

 

CONAGLEN HOUSE:

(see: Inverscaddle)

 

CONA RIVER / ABHAINN CHONGHLEANN:

“Joining Glen River.”  Flows west to east through the midst of Ardgour before joining with the River Scaddle west of Invescaddle Bay, where these intermingled waters empty into Loch Linnhe.

 

CONEACHAN / COINNEACHAN:

“Place of the Foggy Bee.”  Located along the Gairlochy Road (B8004), northwest of the Commando Memorial. 

 

CORAN FEARNA:

“Alder Tree Headland.”  Located in northeast Ardgour, just west of Camusnagaul.

 

CORECHRECHANE:

(see: Corrychurachan)

 

CORPACH / A' CHORPAICH / CORPAICH / CORPYCH:

"Place of the corpses/bodies" or "Field of the Dead," where the "noble dead" were brought overland to await a boat to take them to Iona for burial.  An alternate meaning of this placename is Corpaich – “Ground Under Which There is Decayed Wood.”  A village and township, located near the southern extremity of the Caledonian Canal (which begins at Corpach Harbor) and the entrance to Loch Eil.

 

Originally a scattered shore clachan/settlement with crofts round the arc, or strip of ground about 300 yards wide between the head of Loch Linnhe and the original southern margin of Corpach Moss (from the River Lochy to the present day Caledonian Canal).  This strip of ground fringed Beauncamus.  After the construction of the canal, the old Kilmallie settlement also came to be known as Corpach.   Home to the Kilmallie Parish church.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.  Home to excellent views of Ben Nevis and (until recently) a large, thriving pulp mill.

(also see: Corpach House)

(also see: Corpach Moss)

 

CORPACH (THE BATTLE OF):

1439.

 

CORPACH HILL:

Located just north of Corpach, a 764 foot hill with scenic views of Ben Nevis.

 

CORPACH HOUSE:

Located in Corpach.  Donald Cameron of Lochiel, XXII Chief of Clan Cameron temporarily resided here after the restoration of the Lochiel Estate, since Achnacarry had been burned to the ground in 1746.

 

CORPACH MOSS / AM BLAR MOR / BLAR MOR:

"Blar Mor," "Big Plain, Moss" or “The Big Peat Moss.”  Located near the village of Corpach, at the head of Loch Linnhe.  In olden times this was a well-known and frequented rendezvous of drovers and their herds from both Lochaber and the surrounding Highlands.   Across the River Lochy there is another place, Blar Meanbh, which translated to “Small Plain.”

 

CORRAN (NARROWS):

“Sickle” (in reference to the shape of this place).  Located approximately eight miles south of Fort William, on Loch Linnhe.  A very swift current at this location sets up strong whirlpools on occasion.  During the 1745 Jacobite Uprising Hanoverian ships entering Loch Linnhe were ambushed from both shores here.  There has been ferry service here in past centuries, between Corran and Ardgour.

 

CORRAN DUBH:

“Dark Headland.”  Located northwest of Stronechreggan, north of Gleann Sron a’ Chreagain.

 

CORRICHY (THE BATTLE OF):

October 28, 1562.

 

CORRIECHASSLE / COIR’ A’ CHAISIL:

“Corrie of the Bulwark.”  Located in Glen Pean.

 

CORRIECHOILLE:

(see: Corrychoille)

 

CORRLARACH / CORR-LARACH:

“Excellent Abode.”  Located toward the western end of Cona Glen, due south of the head of Loch Eil.

 

CORRYBEG / CORRIEBEG / COIRE BEAG:

“Small Sea-Gulf” or “The Little Corry.”  A small settlement on the northern shore of Loch Eil, toward its head (Lochielside).   Home to a branch of the MacMasters Clan which was affiliated with Clan Cameron.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacMaster tenants.

 

CORRYCHURACHAN / CORRYCHURRACHAN / CORRYCHERICHAN / COIRE CHAORACHAN / CORRIECHURRACHAN / COIR’ A’ CHAORACHAIN / CORECHRECHANE / COIR’ A’ CHREACHAINN:

“Corry Abounding in Rowan Berries,” “Corrie of the Hard Rocky Surface Without Foliage” or “Corrie of the Small Sheep.”  Located southwest of Fort William, in Nether Lochaber, near the Corran Narrows of Loch Linnhe and present-day A82.  At one time a jointure house or dower house of the Lochiel family.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron and MacKenzie tenants.  In 1522 this location was spelt Corechrechane.

 

One evening a local postman was reported to have viewed two "troops" of fairies dancing on the grass here; they would be the last of many fairies to be spotted in Nether Lochaber.  This location had the reputation of being the “haunt of fairies.”

 

CNAP CRUINN:

“Little Round Hill.”  Located southeast of Beinn Chlianaig.

 

CNOC NAN CEANN BEAGA:

“Hill of the Little Head.”  Located southwest of Beinn Chlianaig and due south of Insh/Inch.

 

CNOC NAN CEANN MORA:

“Hill of the Big Head.”  Located southwest of Beinn Chlianaig and due south of Bunroy.

 

CORRYCHOILLIE / CORRIECHOILLE / COIR’ A’ CHOINGLIGH:

"The Wooded Corry."  Three miles from Spean Bridge, along the south bank of the River Spean, in Glen Spean.  Not on the Lochiel Estate, but this farm and surrounding area were home to numerous Cameron families, including the famous drover John Cameron of Corrychoille, who once had a flock of 60,000 sheep here.

 

CORUANAN / COIRE UANAN / CORRIWINNAN / COIR’ UANAIN:

“Corrie of the Little Lamb.”  Located south of Druimarbin, near the eastern shore of Loch Linnhe, approximately four miles south of Fort Wiliam.  Home to the MacLachlans of Curuanan.  A branch of this clan was confederated with Clan Cameron and were the hereditary standard-bearers of Lochiel.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacLachlan, McKiarick (Henderson) and MacKenzie tenents.

 

The MacLachlan Chietain was interchangeably known as “of Corriwinnan.”

 

COUNSEL STONE:

(see: Samuel's Stone)

 

COUR (THE) / A’ CHAOIR:

“Rapid Torrent.”  Tributary that receives numerous streams in the Leanachan Forest before emptying into the River Spean near Killiechonate.

 

COWAL:

The Camerons living in this area were said to have been descended from Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron and the men who were his followers.

 

COW HILL / MEALL A’ CHRUIDH:

Sometimes listed incorrectly as “Crow Hill” on maps.  Scenic hillside that rises behind and overlooks Fort William.  Used by Clan Cameron as a location for their cannon battery during the siege of Fort William, during March and April of 1746.  Elevation 941/942 feet.

 

CRAIGAG / CREAGAG:

“A Perch.”  Located near Callop, near Glenfinnan.

 

CRAIG CAILLOCH, (THE BATTLE OF):

1441.

 

CRAIGS, THE:

Cemetery in Fort William.  A few yards towards the town center from its entrance is an outcrop of rock, like a large rough boulder.  From here Cameron field guns bombarded Fort William for two weeks beginning about March 20, 1746.  In 1793 this very same location hosted the swearing in of the first recruits of the 79th Regiment, The Cameron Highlanders.

 

CRANACHAN / CREANEACHAN:

Small Market Place.”  Located at the foot of Gleann Glas Dhoire, northeast of Bohuntine.  As suggested by the name, this location was one of Lochaber markets.

 

CRAOIBH:

(see: Creiff)

 

CREAGAG:

(see: Craigag)

 

CREAGAN AN RIGH:

“Rock of the King” or “Rocky Place of Royalty.”  Located north of Tomacharich, near Wade’s old military road.

 

CREAG AN T-SAIGHDEIR:

“Rock of the Soldier” or “The Soldier’s Knoll.”  A prominent rocky feature located between the River Arkaig and the Dark Mile, by Torr a’ Mhuilt.  With views of Achnacarry, this placename may refer to an ancient military watch location for Clan Cameron.

 

CREAG AN UILT CHAOIL / CREAG AN UILT CHAOIN:

“The Rock of the Mild Stream.”  A small rock situated on the south shore of Loch Arkaig, approximately 1 ½ miles northeast of Kinlocharkaig.

 

CREAGBHEITHEACHAIN / CREAG BHEATHACHAIN:

“Rock of the Little Beast.”  Located in Glen Scaddle, along the River Scaddle, west of Aryhoulan.

 

CREAG DHONN:

“Brown Rock.”  A rocky feature located northwest of Beinn Bhan, near the southern edge of An t’Seann Fhrith, The Old Forest.  Also a place located just north of the Dark Mile.   

 

CREAG DHONN:

“Brown Rock.”  A hill located just north of the Dark Mile, between Loch Lochy and the River Caig.  Also a place northwest of Beinn Bhan, near the southern edge of An t’Seann Fhrith.  

 

CREAG DUBH / DHUBH:

“Black Fell / Rock.”  Just north of the Braes of Lochaber, near Allt Glas Dhoire.  Also a place near the head of Glen Loy and also in Gleann Dhomhanaidh, southeast of Torlundy.

 

CREAG DUBH / DHUBH:

“Black Fell / Rock.”  Located toward the head of Glen Loy, just north of the River Loy.  Also a place just north of the Braes of Lochaber and also in Gleann Dhomhanaidh, southeast of Torlundy.

 

CREAG DUBH / DHUBH:

“Black Fell / Rock.”  Located in Gleann Dhomhanaidh, southeast of Torlundy and just south of the major bend in the Allt na Caillich.  Also a place just north of the Braes of Lochaber and also near the head of Glen Loy.

 

CREAG GHUANACH / CREAG UANACH:

“Rock Where Lambs Abound” or “Giddy Rock.”  Located just west of the head of Loch Treig.

 

CREAG INNIS NAM BO / CREAG INNIS NAM BORD:

Rock Island of the Cow” or “Rock of the Places of Tables.”  A rocky precipice located south of the Clan Cameron Museum.  A steep 50’ rock face that British Commandos practiced scaling while training at Achnacarry during WWII.

 

CREAG LIATH:

“Grey Rock.”  A prominent cliff of a rocky hill face located on the southwestern edge of the Clunes Forest, west of Loch Lochy.  Also a place located north of Kilmallie.

 

CREAG LIATH:

“Grey Rock.”  Located north of Kilmallie, on the southern slope of Corpach Hill.  Also a place located on the southwestern edge of the Clunes Forest.

 

CREAG NAM MEANN:

“The Kids Rock.”  Located between Allt Laire and Beinn Chlianaig.

 

CREAG NAN EACH:

“Horses Rock” or “Horses Hill.”  A prominent hill feature located on the southwest edge of An t’Seann Fhrith, northwest of Beinn Bhan.

 

CREAG SGIATHACH:

“Winged Rock” or “Dragon Rock.”  Located southwest of Brackletter. 

 

CREAG UANACH:

(see: Creag Ghuanach)

 

CREANEACHAN:

(see: Cranachan)

 

CREST:

* CAMERON (OLD):  A dexter arm embowed in armor, the hand grasping a sword, "all proper," encircled by a belt and buckle, which denotes the "follower" and uses the motto "Mo Righ's Mo Dhuchaich" - "For King and Country," in English, Gaelic or Latin.

* CAMERON (NEW):  A sheaf of five arrows, "proper," tied with a red band, gules, encircled by a belt and buckle, which denotes the "follower" and uses the Clan motto, Aonaibh ri Cheile.

 

CRIEFF / CRIOTHACH / CRAOIBH:

“Place of the aspens” or “Tree Place.”  Located between Sallachan and Ardachvie, on the north shore of Loch Arkaig.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.  When surveyed in 1772 Crieff was noted as a “very small insignificant farm,” with bad pasture lands, covered by heath and scattered oaks. 

 

CRIOTHACH:

(see: Crieff)

 

CROIT AN T SEANN DUINE:

“The Old Man’s Croft.”  Location of a crofter’s dwelling house (in 1875) and piece of ground in Glen Mallie, near the River Mallie and southwest of Eas Buidhe.

 

CROWBERRY:

Empetrum Nigrum.  One of the ancient badges of Clan Cameron.  An evergreen heath like shrub, member of the Empetraceae family. Readily found throughout Lochaber.  Also called "Raven's Berry," "The Starling's Plant," and "The Black Knobby Plant."  The Gaelic spelling is Lus Na Fionnaig/Feannag, or Dearcag Fithich.  It can grow up to ten inches in height and has branches that are crowded with dark evergreen leaves one-quarter inch or so in length.  Crowberry thrives in moderate northern climates, usually in sandy, peaty or acidic soils.  In early May it produces very small, purplish flowers and in time small, black or dark purple fruit, which are said to be edible, though rather bitter and/or bland.  However, the first frosts of autumn make them sweeter and cooking also improves their flavor; they may be used for jams and juices.  Some accounts suggest that if they are consumed in large quantities they may cause headaches - that however has not been substantiated.  The fruit used to be boiled with alum to make a dark purple dye for the clothes of Highland families.  It has also been used in some Indian cultures as a cure for digestive troubles, tuberculosis and other illnesses.

( also see: Oak)

 

CRUACH INNSE:

“Stack ot the Meadow.”  Located southwest of Beinn Chlianaig, southeast of the Leanachan Forest. 

 

CRUIM LEACAINN:

“Curved Broad Slope.”  Located due east of Strone, across the River Lochy.  

 

CRUINNEACHADH NAN CAMRONACH:

"The Camerons' Gathering," a "gathering" piobaireachdan of Clan Cameron.

 

CRY:

(see: War Cry)

 

CUIL / A’ CHUIL:

“The Nook” or “The Retreat.”  A farm (described as a small dwelling house in 1875) located in Glendessary, near the junction of Allt Coir’ a Bhoganaich with the River Dessery, about ½ mile from Glendessery.  Lochaber Macphees formerly resided in this place.

 

CUILCHENNA:

(see: Culchenna)

 

CUINICH:

(see: Caonich)

 

CUL A’ CHNAIP:

(see: Callop)

 

CULCAIRN'S BRAE / BRUACH CUCHARN:

A steep brae on the Locharkaigside road near Kenmore.  The location where Captain Munro of Culcairn (the very same gentleman who directed the burning of Achnacarry earlier that same year) was shot in 1746 by a Cameron clansman.

 

CULCHENNA, (THE CAMERONS OF):

A branch of the family of the Camerons of Callart.

 

CULCHENNA / CUL CHEANNA / CUL CHEANNAIN:

"The Hollow of the Headland" or “At the Back of the Little Headland.”  Located near Onich and North Ballachulish, near Loch Linnhe, at the northern portion of outer Loch Leven.  A place and mill upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron, MacDonald and MacVaister (MacMaster) tenants.

 

CULENAP:

(see: Callop)

 

CULLODEN (THE BATTLE OF):

April 16, 1746.

 

CUMBERLAND'S KETTLES:

Marks on Achnacarry's old sycamore trees which form the front avenue were made by Hanoverian soldiers who hung their cooking kettles between the trees on iron chains, during their occupation following the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

 

CUMHA AILEIN OIG:

"Lament of Young Allan," a "lament" piobaireachdan of Clan Cameron.

 

CUMMINGS:

Cummings from Achdalieu make up a sept of Clan Cameron.  

 

CUINICH:

On the northern shore of Loch Arkaig, just southeast of Loch Blair.

 

DABHACHAN FHASAIDH:

(see: Dochanassie)

 

DAIL A' CHAIT:

(see: Field of the Cat, The)

 

DAIL AN FHUARAIN:

(see: Dalnuaran)

 

DAIL AN T-SUIDHE:

“Field of the Stormy Blast.”  Located just north of Achintee, at the foot of Glen Nevis.  South of the Roaring Mill, along the River Nevis.

 

DAIL MHEANBHAIDH:

(see: Dalvenvie)

 

DAIL NA BITH:

(see: Dalnabie)

 

DAIL RIABHACH / DALRIACH:

"The Brindled Haugh."  A low-lying meadow or field located on the eastern banks of the River Lochy, north of Camisky.

(also see: Dalriach)

 

DALACHOISE:

Located on the River Lochy, north of Dalvenvie and south of Torcastle.

 

DALMACOMER / DAIL MAGH-COMAIR:

(see: Mucomir)

 

DALNABIE / DAIL NA BITH:

“Field of the Resinous Wood.”  Located southeast of Killiechonate, in Glen Spean. 

 

DALNUARAN / DAIL AN FHUARAIN:

“Field of the Spring Well.”  Located in Fort William, near the ruins of the old Fort.  Tradition states that the soldiers from Fort William used the spring for their drinking water supply. 

 

DALRIACH / DAIL RIABHACH:

“Brindled Field.”  Located in Glen Roy.

(also see: Dail Riabhach)

 

DALVENVIE / DAIL MHEANBHAIDH:

“Small Field.”  Located on the River Lochy, between Camghuid and Dalachoise, west of Torlundy.

 

DARK MILE / MILE DORCA:

A narrow densely tree-shaded (“tunnel-like” in the past) roadway or old “turnpike” pass through the hills.  Located in the valley between Torr a' Chronain and Torr a' Mhuilt, which is sub-divided by Torr a Ghallain (a low ridge) through which runs 1.9 miles of twisting roadway from Clunes to the foot of Loch Arkaig.  The River Arkaig runs roughly parallel, on the other side of Torr a Ghallain).  Located to the west, at the valley's upper end, is Loch Arkaig and Clunes lies at the lower or the eastern Loch Lochy end. There is a cave just off this road in which Prince Charles Edward Stuart hid from Hanoverian troops in 1746.  Modern construction of a new road and some roadside fields cleared of trees for pastures have allowed more light, thus the name is not as relevant any longer.  Nevertheless, the Dark Mile, flanked by distinctive moss-covered stone walls, is still considered deeply wooded. 

 

DAWNIE:

(see: Donie)

 

DE:

A prefix to variously spelled versions of the surname Cameron.

(see: specific surname, ignoring DE)

 

DEARG ALLT / DERAGALT:

“The Red Stream/Burn.”  A large mountain stream flowing southwest (from near Coire na Cloiche Bige) into the River Dessary, just northwest of Strathan.  Also a stream that rises near Meall an-t-Seamraig that flows into Loch Arkaig.

 

DEARG ALLT:

“The Red Stream/Burn.”  A stream rising near Meall an t-Seamraig that flows north before falling into Loch Arkaig, nears the southern shore’s foot.  Also a stream that flows into the River Dessary, northwest of Strathan.

 

DERAGALT:
(see: Dearg Allt)

 

DESSARRY:

(see: Glen Dessarry)

 

DESSARY (RIVER) / ABHAINN DEAS-AIRIGH:

“River of the South Sheiling” or “River of Right Pastures.”  Flows southeast through Glen Dessary, merging with the River Pean at Strathan.  The combined waters flow into Loch Arkaig, at its head.

 

DISPUTED LANDS, (THE):

The lands of Glenloy and Loch Arkaig, including the Arkaig catchment area, and land bordering on Loch Quoich, the headwaters of the Garry.  This dispute was a lengthy one, as to the ownership of these lands, between Lochiel and Macintosh.  The Macintoshes claimed ownership back to the year 1291, but the Camerons retained the lands due to their occupation over several centuries; the Celtic tribal system determined land ownership by virtue of long possession or conquest.

 

DOBHACH AN FHASAIDH:

(see: Dochanassie)

 

DOCHANASSIE / DOBHACH AN FHASAIDH:

“Davoch/Vat of the Stance/Station,” alluding to a strip of arable land capable of growing sufficient grain to fill a vat  A township/region by the shores of Loch Lochy, from Gairlochy to Letterfinlay or New Bridge, renowned for its strong, tall and daring Cameron/MacMartin men (known as “Dochanassie Camerons”).  These men followed Lochiel in battle, but were vassals of the Duke of Gordon.  Many of them carried a multi-knobbed cudgel, known locally as a “Dochanassis Stick,” which was much like a shillelagh.  In 1805 there were 34 Cameron-MacMartin Dochanassies living in the area, mostly at Invergloy.  

(also see: MacMartin)

 

DOIRE AN LOCHAIN:

“Oak Grove of the Small Loch.”  Located in Glen Garvan, between the North Garvan River and South Garvan River.

 

DOIRE AN T-SIOSALAICH:

“Chisholm’s Oak Grove” or “Chisholm’s Wood.”  A patch of “natural grown hardwood” (in 1875) located in Glen Mallie, just north of the River Mallie and due south of Loch Briobaig. 

 

DOIRE BAN:

“Fair Grove.”  Located south of Loch Lundavra

 

DOIRE BEAG:

“Small Oak Grove.”  Located in Glen Fionnlighe, north of Drumasallie.

 

DOIRE DONN:

“Bad / Evil Oak Grove.”  Located along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, between Inverscaddle Bay and Stronechreggan.

 

DOIRE DRISEACH:

“Oak Grove Covered in Brambles.”  Located within Cona Glen, north of the junction of the Rivers Cona and Scaddle.

 

DOIRE DUBH:

“Dark Grove of Oak Trees.”  A “small portion of mixed woods” (presumably consisting mostly of oak) located along the southern shore of Allt Camgharaidh, just south of Loch Arkaig and west of Gerraran.

 

DOIRE DUBH NAN EACH:

“Dark Grove of the Horses?”  Located in Ardgour, near the head of Glen Garvan. 

 

DOIRE MHEAR:

“Wobbling Oak Grove?”  Located south of Duisky and south of An Dubh Uisge.

 

DOIRE NA MUICE:

“Oak Grove of the Pig.”  Located southeast of Duisky, running south from the southern shore of Loch Eil.

 

DOIRE NA SLEAGHAICH:

“Oak Grove of the Spear?”  Located toward the head of the South Garvan River, south of the southwestern end of Loch Eil.

 

DOMHANAIDH / DOMHANAIDH NAN CAT:

(see: Donie)

 

DONALD DUBH (THE REBELLION OF):

1503.

 

DONIE / DAWNIE / DORNIE / DOMHANAIDH / DOMHANAIDH NAN CAT:

“Hollow Place.”  A settlement formerly located in Gleann Domhanaidh, south of the River Lundy and just east of the present-day Nevis Range facility.  Possibly known in the past as Domhanaidh nan Cat – Donie of the Cats and also Dawnie (a corrupted version of Donie).   

 

DONIE/DAWNIE, (THE CAMERONS OF):

A branch of the Camerons of Glenevis.  According to tradition Ewen, son of Allan, son of Donald the Black, son of Alexander of Glenevis occupied Dawnie in 1745.  He is said to have led a body of Glenevis Camerons in the Highland army and to have received special recognition for gallantry from Prince Charles; family tradition states that he was in fact knighted by the Prince.

(also see: Camerons of Barcaldine)

 

DORNIE:

(see: Donie)

 

DOWIE:

A major sept of Clan Cameron

 

DROCHAID AN AONACHAIN:

(see: Spean Bridge)

 

DROCHAID ARKAIG:

“Bridge of the Arkaig.”  Location of several eras of bridges spanning the River Arkaig, at Bun Arkaig.

 

DROCHAID A’ CHAM:

(see: Drochaid Cham)

 

DROCHAID CHAM:

“Crooked Bridge.”  A crooked bridge, built of stone, located (in 1875) approximately ½ mile northeast of Moy, on either the B8004 or B8005.

 

DROCHAID CHIAAIG

 

“Caig Bridge” of “Bridge of Spray.”  Located toward the western end of the Dark Mile, just south of Caig Falls (falls of the River Caig and associated “Witch’s Pool.”)  Probably of nineteenth century construction, this bridge was made famous in the 1995 motion picture “Rob Roy.”

 

DROCHAID FHADA:

“Long Bridge.”  A bridge located (in 1875) either on the B8004 or B8005, approximately 1/8th mile east of Drochaid a’ Chaim.

 

DROCHAID INVERSKILAVULIN:

“Bridge of the Confluence of the Mill Burn.”  A bridge over the River Loy, located just south of Inverskilavulin.

 

DROCHAID NA LAOIGH:

“Bridge of the River Loy” or “Calf’s Bridge.”  Located just north of Strone, this bridge crossed the River Loy.  Associated with the adjacent placename Loy Bridge.

 

DROCHAID NA MAGHA:

“Bridge of the Plain.”  A bridge across the Allt Coire Chraoibhe, along the B8004, at Moy.

 

DROCHAID NAN DATHADAIREAN:

 

“Bridge of the Dyers/Ash Burn.”  Located south of Fort William, on Lundavra Road, at the crossing of the Allt nan Dathadairean. 

 

DROCHAID RUAIDH:

(see: Roy Bridge)

 

DRUIM A’ CHUIRN:

“Ridge of the Cairn.”  A large mountain located on the south side of Glen Kingie, north of Upper Glendessary.

 

DRUIM A’ GHIUBHAIS:

(see: Druim na’ Ghiubhais)

 

DRUIMANDONICH / DRUMNADONACH / DRUMDONAICH:

 

Located on the north side of the River Spean, just west of Inver Roy.  The land rises here to a ridge over five miles long.  In the western part of the ridge is a farm called Druimandonich.  Older Maps show this ridge extending an additional four miles east of the farm, so it seems likely that the whole ridge was originally called by this name.

 

DRUIMARBIN / DRUIM-EARBAIN / DRUIM NA H-EARBA:

“Little Rod-Deer Ridge.”  Just south of Ach' an Todhair, near Loch Linnhe.  Directly west of Ben Nevis.  The name sake of this old settlement is located just to the east, namely the ridge in that location.

 

DRUIM BEAG:

“Little Ridge.”  Located between Glen Fionnlighe and Glen Suileag, north of Abhainn Bheagaig.  A number of mid-altitude lochans are located within this ridge.    

 

DRUIM DARAICH:

“Oak Ridge.”  Located along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, south of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

DRUIM-EARBAIN:

(see: Druimarbin)

 

DRUIM FADA:

“The Long Ridge” or “Mountain of the Long Ridge.”  An elevated ridge of land stretching from Claigionn na Sroine to Coille Mhor; south of Glen Loy and north of Corpach, adjacent to Stob a'Ghrianain.  This ridge has an average height of 2000 feet.

 

DRUIM FEARNA:

“Alder Tree Ridge.”  Located southwest of the head of Loch Eil, south of Drumfern.

(also see: Drumfern)

 

DRUIM GLEANN LAOIGH:

“Back of The Winding Glen,” “Ridge Glen of the Calf” or simply “Glenloy Ridge.”  An elevated long ridge of land on the north side of Glen Loy, extending from the Mam to near Meall a’ Phuibuil. 

 

DRUIM LEATHAD NAM FIAS:

“Slope of the Hairy Tufts Ridge.”  Located between Conaglen and Glen Scaddle, in Ardgour.

 

DRUIM LIATH:

“Grey Ridge.”  Located on the eastern side of Loch Lochy, just north of Dochanassie.

 

DRUIM NA GIUBHSAICH / DRUIM A’ GHIUBHAIS / GUISACH:

“Guisach Ridge” or “Ridge of Firs.”  An extensive ridge of elevated ground located between Glen Mallie and Loch Arkaig.  Located off the southwest edge of Guisach (The Pine Forest).  

 

DRUIM NA H-EARBA:

(see: Druimarbin)

 

DRUIM NAN GLAC:

“Ridge of the Dells.”  Located near Blarachaoran.

 

DRUIM NA SGRIODAIN:

“Ridge of the Scree” or “Ridge of the Stony Ravine.”  Located west of Keil and Cille Mhaodain.

 

DRUIMSALLIE:

(see: Drumasallie)

 

DRUMASALLIE / DRUMSALLIE / DRIMNASALLIE (GAELIC: DRUIM NA SAILEACH / DRUIM NA SAILLE / DRUIM NA SAILE):

The “Willow Ridge,” “Ridge of the Willows,” or “Ridge of the Sallow” -  deriving its name from a hill/ridge overlooking this location on the north.  At the head of Loch Eil, Drumasallie is in actuality the extremity of Loch Eil, not, as commonly believed, Kinlochiel.  This small settlement is where the hill waters of the Fionn Lighe and Dubh Lighe wind through a grassy plain and sandy shore to mingle with the "brackish" water of Loch Eil.  Home to the Camerons of Drumasallie.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron wadsetters.

(also see: Camerons of Kinlochiel)

 

 

DRUMFERN / DRUIM FEARNA:

“Alder Ridge.”  Located just southwest of Drumasallie.

(also see: Druim Fearna)

 

 

DRUMLUI (THE BATTLE OF):

Circa 1337.

 

DUBHAILIGH (RIVER):

(see: Dubh Light – River)

 

DUBH CHLAIS:

“Black Hollow” or “Dark Hollow.”  Located west of Loy Bridge, in southern Glen Loy.

 

DUBH LIGHE (RIVER) / RIVER DUBHAILIGH:

A river that runs along Gleann Dubh Lighe (Gleann Duibhaligh) into Loch Eil near Drumsallie.

 

DUBHSITHE:

Ancient name for the Clan MacPhee.  A place name thought to mean "Dark Fairy Hill" or "Dark Place of the Fairies."

 

DUBH UISGE:

(see: Duisky)

(see: An Dubh Uisge)

 

DUISKY / DUBH UISGE:

“Black Water” or “Dark Water.”  An old township that took its name from the stream nearby (An Dubh Uisge).  Located on the south shore of Loch Eil, at its midpoint.

 

DUNCANSBURGH:

The most name incarnation for the town of Maryburgh, which surrounded Fort William.

 

DUNDAVRAY / DUNDAWRA:

(see: Dun Deabhraidh)

 

DUN DEABHRAIDH / DUNDAVRAY / DUNDAWRA:

“Deabhra’s Fort.”  The ruins of this place are located on an island in Loch Lundavra, and are said to have been home to an ancient chieftain.

 

DUN DEARDUIL / DUN DEARG SUIL / DUN DEARDAIL:

“Dearbal Or Deirdre’s Fort” or "Hill of the Red Eye."  On a knoll, a rounded green hill located approximately one-half mile from present day Glen Nevis House, in Glen Nevis.  At about 1000 feet on the summit there are remnants of an ancient vitrified fort dating to about 500 B.C.

 

DUN DIGE:

“Fort of the Ditch/Moat,” “Fort of a Marsh Dyke” or “Moat Hillock.”  Residence of Cameron of Glen Nevis, located approximately one-third of the way into Glen Nevis.  Used as headquarters for Lochiel and Keppoch when they laid siege to Fort William in early 1746.  Burned by Cumberland's men in 1746.  Located in present-day Glen Nevis behind the Youth Hostel, in a small grove of tall beech trees.

 

DUNGALLON:

Possibly meaning "Gallan's Fort."  A rocky islet in Loch Sunart, near Camusinas.  Name place origin of the Camerons of Dungallon, but not the residence of their head of family.

 

DUNGALLON, (THE CAMERONS OF):

Descended from Archibald, the eldest son of John Cameron of Glendessary's second marriage.  Even though this line is named after the Dungallon, in Loch Sunart, their residence was at Glen Hurich, in Sunart.  A cadet family of Clan Cameron.  During the 1745 Uprising they also led men from Sunart and Ardnamurchan.

 

DUNKELD (THE BATTLE OF):

August 21, 1689.

 

DUN LICE:

“Flagstone Hill.”  Located northeast of Tomacharich.

 

DYER’S BURN:

(see: Allt nan Dathadairean)

 

 

[Back to Top]

 

E-F

 

 

EAS AN T-SLINNEIN:

(see: Tom Eas an t-Slinnean)

 

EAS BUIDHE:

“Yellow Waterfall.”  A small cascade or rapids approximately 10 feet in height located on the River Mallie toward the western edge of An t’Seann Fhrith and southwest of Loch Briobaig.

 

EAS CHIA-AIG / EAS CHAI-AIG:

(see: Caig Falls)

 

EAS CHIABHAIG:

(see: Caig Falls)

 

EAS A' CHLAIGINN:

(see: Roaring Mill)

 

EAS CHLIANAIG / EAS CHLAOINAIG:

(see: Chlianaig Falls)

 

EAS NAM FITHEACH:

“Waterfall of the Ravens.”  Located northeast of Fassifern.

 

EAS NAN LONG:

“Waterfall of the Ships.”  Rapids and falls along the River Lochy, just northeast of Tor Castle and Banquo’s Walk.  This location is said to have been the site of a mass drowning of commandos during WW2 (it was rumored that 12 were drowned when their barge broke up in spate conditions).  In years gone by this was a popular salmon poaching spot.

 

EILEAN A' BHEALAIDH:

Broom Island” or “Island of the Broom” (both in reference to the shrub known as Scotch Broom).  Also known locally as “Lily Island.”  Located next to (east of) Eilean nan Craobh, in Loch Eil, near its junction with Loch Linnhe, opposite Corpach.  Contiguous with Eilean na Creich at low tide.  Also a place near the mouth of the River Lochy.

 

EILEAN A’ BHEALAIDH:

Broom Island” or “Island of the Broom.”  Located near the mouth of the River Lochy.  Also a place in Loch Eil, opposite Corpach.

 

EILEAN A’ CHUNNRAIDH:

“Island of the Compact.”  Located near St. Munn’s Isle, in Loch Leven.

 

EILEAN A' GHIUBHAIS:

“Fir Island.”  A small island (which at one time was planted in fir trees) near the southern shore of Loch Arkaig at its mid-point, at the western end of Guisach.

 

EILEAN AN DUNAIN:

“Island of the Little Knoll.”  Located near Eilean Choinnich, in Loch Leven.

 

EILEAN A' RUDHA DEARG:

"Red Point Island."  Next to Eilean na Creich (east of) in Loch Eil, near its junction with Loch Linnhe, opposite Corpach and also a projection of Ardgour called Rudha Dearg.

 

EILEAN CHALUM CILLE / EILEAN CHALUIM-CILLE:

(see: Eilean Locharkaig)

 

EILEAN CHOINNICH:

“Kenneth’s Island.”  A green islet named for either St. Kenneth or for a MacKenzie of North Ballachulish who was killed here in combat.  Located near Carnais, east of Ballachulish.

 

EILEAN COLUMKILL(E):

(see: Eilean Locharkaig)

 

EILEAN DARACH/ EILEAN DARRACH:

An islet in Loch Lochy now submerged (the Caledonian Canal raised the water level in Loch Lochy twelve feet when it was created).  The island was artificial in origin, being created by Mackintoshes in 1580, to garrison Cameron lands and stage attacks upon Cameron strongholds.

 

EILEAN FEARNA:

Alderwood Island.”  Located near the mouth of the River Lochy, just north of the village of Inverlochy.

 

EILEAN LOCHARKAIG:

Also known at one time as “Island Columbkill(e),” “Eilean Chalum Cille” or “Island of Saint Columb(a).”  A small island near the foot of Loch Arkaig, off Achnasaul Point (northwest of Achnacarry).  There is an ancient vitrified fort located on this island, with a zigzagging underwater causeway to the shore.  There was a chapel on this island at one time, which was in use in the 17th century, when Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel imprisoned some of General Monk's officers here.  A MacPhee burial place was located here in the past.

 

EILEAN MHIC AN TOISICH:

An island now laying underwater in Loch Lochy in Clunes Bay.  It was supposedly constructed by Macintosh as a base for his men to "harry" the Cameron lands in the 16th century.

 

EILEAN MHIC DHOMHAIL DHUIBH:

(see: Lochiel's Island)

 

EILEAN MOR / MHOR:

“Big Island.”  A large island located in the midst of the River Lochy, near Old Inverlochy Castle and the Inverlochy battefield, east of the river's junction with Loch Linnhe.

 

EILEAN MUNDA / EILEAN MUNDE / EILEAN MHUNNA:

“St. Munn's Island.”  Located on Loch Leven, southwest of Callart and opposite Ballachulish.  The burial place of the MacDonalds of Glencoe, Stewarts of Ballachulish and Appin, the MacKenzies of Onich, and Camerons of Callart is on the north side of this island.  There are also remains on-site of the old St. Munn's Church.

 

EILEAN NA CREICH:

“Booty/Plunder Island” or - more recently to locals - “Bluebell Island.”  Located adjacent (east) to Eilean a' Bhealaidh in Loch Eil, near its junction with Loch Linnhe, opposite Corpach.  These two neighboring islands are contiguous at low tide.

 

EILEAN NAM BAN:

Island of the Women.”  Located adjacent to St. Munn’s Island, in Loch Leven.

 

EILEAN NAM FAOILEAG:

Island of the Sea Gulls.”  Located adjacent to St. Munn’s Island, in Loch Leven.

 

EILEAN NAN CRAOBH / EILEAN NA'N CRAOBH :

“Island of the Trees,” “Tree Island,” “Island of Loch Eil, “Isle of Loch Eil” or – more recently by locals – “Bluebell Island.”  The earliest known place of residence for the chiefs of Clan Cameron (said to date back to the year 1335)  - formerly a picturesque island (a small “islet”) at the junction of Loch Eil and Loch Linnhe, just south off the shore near Corpach, and almost opposite of the church of Kilmalie.   Of the four islands in near proximity to one another at this location, Eilean nan Craobh is the western most.  Nothing remains of this strategically-placed Clan Cameron stronghold, since it was made of timber, and was replaced as Lochiel's seat of power by Tor Castle circa 1530, though it seems to have remained in the Lochiel family until sometime after 1607 in other limited capacities.  The area surrounding this island has been found to be very deep water, which may have secured the Cameron stronghold from most non-ship incursions.

In recent years the side of this island facing Corpach was enlarged slightly by the Corpach Pulp Mill, for the purpose of locating heavy ship loading equipment.  At that time the north part of the island was excavated; no signs of past habitation were found.

 

EILEAN TOM NAN DROBHAIREAN:

“The Drivers Island.”  A small island located in Bun Arkaig Bay, at the western extremity of Loch Lochy.

 

EIREACHD:

(see: Erracht)

 

END OF THE GREAT BRIDGE, THE:

(see: Ceann na drochait mhor)

 

ENGLISH OAK:

(see: Oak)

 

ERRACHT / ERRACHD / ERROCHT / EIREACHD / AIRD-RUAIDH / ARDROY:

“Place of Assembly.”  Located on an elevated plateau at the center of Glen Loy's eastern entrance, and seen from the Caledonian Canal between Gairlochy and Banavie. There is a marker cairn presently in-place, denoting the old Erracht lands.  In 1745 there were Camerons, MacVaister-Camerons, Ick Phaal (MacPhail)-Camerons and MacMartin-Camerons living here, as both wadsetters and tenants.  One theory suggests that the original name for this place was Aird-ruaidh or Ardroy.

 

ERRACHT, (THE CAMERONS OF):

The first Cameron of Erracht was Ewen, eldest son of Ewen, thirteenth Chief of Clan Cameron, by his second wife, Marjory MacKintosh.  The family has been known as "Sliochd Eoghainn mhic Eoghainn," or "Sliochd Eoghainn 'ic Eoghainn," the descendants of Ewen, son of Ewen.  Donald Cameron of Erracht took his place beside Lochiel as second in command of Clan Cameron during the Rising of 1745.  As a result, Donald was a wanderer from his family and friends for about three years after Culloden.  There are no surviving male members of the Erracht line.

(also see: Tartan, Cameron of Erracht)

 

FAILTE SHIR EOGHAN:

"Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel (XVII Chief) Salute," a "salute" piobaireachdan of Clan Cameron.

 

FALKIRK (THE BATTLE OF):

January 17, 1746.

 

FALLS OF CAIG:

(see: Caig Falls)

 

FALLS OF MUCOMIR:

In the past scenic waterfalls were located here, where Loch Lochy joins the Spean River, forming the River Lochy.  The falls dried up in 1962, due to the construction of a hydro-electric dam being opened.  

(also see: Mucomir)

 

FASSIEFERN / FASSFERN / FASADH FEARNA / AM FASADH FEARNA:

“Place of the Alders/Alderwood Stance” OR “Alderwood Station.”  Once the home of the Camerons of Fassiefern, and before that to an off-shoot branch of the MacLachlans of Coruanan.  Located at about the midpoint of the northern shore of Loch Eil, at the entrance of Gleann Suileag.

Said to be the place where "Bonnie Prince Charlie" plucked a white rose from a bush and put it on his hat, becoming the famous White Cockade, the emblem of the Jacobites of the '45.  The bed he is said to have slept in now resides at the West Highland Museum, in Fort William.  Four clumps of Scots pines, located in this area, are said to have been planted to represent the sites of the Jacobite army's bivouac sites in August, 1745.  

The name of a road that forms the southern boundary of Fort William.

 

FASSIEFERN, (THE CAMERONS OF):

Descended from John Cameron, second son of John Cameron, XVIII Chief of Clan Cameron, by his wife, Isabella.  While not actually joining in the Rising of 1745, he is said to have materially aided his brother Donald at that time with money "to provide him with the sinews of war."  Prince Charles Edward Stuart spent a night in the house of Fassiefern - the room is still pointed out.  An obelisk commemorating Colonel John Cameron of Fassiefern is located near location of the present Kilmalie parish church.

 

FASS NA H-ULAIDH:

 

“Stance of the Treasure?”  Located along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, just east of Fernlea.

 

FEDDAN / FEADAN:

“Crevice Through Which the Winds Blows.”  Site of a croft which sat right on a disputed Cameron-Glengarry boundary line, just below Meall an Tagraidh.  The elderly woman who lived here managed to divert a stream each time either the Cameron or Glengarry men came to collect the rent.  She managed to avoid paying rent for years, claiming her home was on the other side of the boundary stream.

 

FEITH A’ BHROLAICH:

The eastern pass, from the head of Loch Arkaig to Glen Kingie.  Also known as “The Trail to Glen Kingie.”

 

FEITH CHIARAIN:

“Ciaran’s Bog-Channel.”  Located south of Loch Treig.

 

FERNLEA:

Just south of Trislaig, on the northern shore of Loch Linnhe.

 

FIELD OF THE CAT, (THE) / DAIL A’ CHAIT:

Legend has it that on the advice of Gormshuil, the Witch of Moy, Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, slowly roasted a stray Lochaber cat in a hut located in this field, to learn his penance for past "indiscretions."  Soon the "King of Cats," Cam Dubh, arrived and agreed to tell Ewen his penance if he released the smoldering cat.  When the cat was freed, it was said to have sprinted to the cliffs near Torcastle and leapt into the River Lochy.  Thus the Cat Pool and the Cat Rapids just beyond.

 

FINNAN:

(see: Glen Finnan)

 

FINNART:

A branch of MacSorlie-Camerons settled here, in about the 17th century.

 

FINNTAIG:

(see: Upper Glen Fintaig)

 

FINTAIG WATER:

Runs from near Glen Roy’s Beinn Laruinn down to the River Gloy, with its junction being near Upper Glenfintaig.

 

FIONN LIGHE (RIVER) / RIVER FIONNAILIGH / ABHAINN FIONNAILIGH:

“River of a White Rocky Place” “River of the Light Glen” “River of the Glen of the White Flood.”  Runs along Gleann Fionn Lighe into Loch Eil near Kinlochiel.

 

FLODDEN (THE BATTLE OF):

September 9, 1513.

 

FORDS OF ARKAIG:

(see: Arkaig Ford)

 

FORDS OF LOCHY:

(see: Lochy Fords)

 

"FOR KING AND COUNTRY":

Ancient motto of Clan Cameron.

(see: Motto or Crest)

 

FORT WILLIAM / AN GEARASDAN / KILLICHWIMAN / CILLE CHUMAIN:

Located on a picturesque setting, on the southern shore of Loch Linnhe, at the foot of Ben Nevis.  In ancient times, the area now known as Fort William was called Achintore, or Auchintor-Beg.  The original fort on this site was built in 1654 by General Monk and was constructed of timber - primarily "liberated" from the oak forests of Cameron lands.  The structure that would become Fort William was built in 1689/90 by General MacKay, a commander of King William's troops to garrison Lochaber, and was named after William of Orange.   The fort itself was made of stone with 20 foot walls and could hold up to 1000 men.  It was a much despised structure to the Camerons of Lochiel, who harried the fort for years - it was known as An Gearasdan or "The Garrison," and also Killichwiman or Cille Chumain, in Gaelic.  By 1864 the fort was dismantled and parts were sold off as dwellings.  In 1889 the remainder was bought by the West Highland Railway Company and demolished to make way for the new railroad.  The original site of the fort is on the northeast side of the present town.

 

The town of Fort William originally began as huts which sprung up around the fort.  The present-day Fort William is the largest town in the Western Highlands, and is considered "Lochaber's Heart."  In 1896 it became the first town in Britain to have its streets and dwellings lit by electricity, provided by hydroelectric power.  "A morning's march from Achnacarry."

(also see: Maryburgh)

 

FORTY-FIVE, (THE):

Jacobite Uprising of 1745-46, in which an estimated total 1,400 Camerons participated (at different times throughout the campaign).

 

FRAOCH BEINN:

Heath Mountain.”  A moderately sized mountain located approximately ½ mile west of the footpath from the head of Loch Arkaig to Glen Kingie.  North of Meallan Dubh.

 

FRAOCH MOR:

"The Big Heath" or “Big Heath.”  A portion of “heathery ground and open wood (chiefly stunted birch)” located south of Allt Camgharaidh, in Glen Camgarry. 

 

FUARNAN A’ COIRE DHUIBH:

“Spring of the Dark Corrie” or “Spring of the Black Hollow.”  A spring located near the summit of Beinn Bhan’s (to its northeast).

 

FUINALTAN:

Just northwest of Garvan, on the southern shore of Loch Eil, towards its western end.

 

 

 [Back to Top]

 

G-H

 

GAIRLOCHY / GEARR LOCHAIDH:

“Fort on Lochy” or “Short Lochy.”  A small settlement at the south end of Loch Lochy, near its junction with the River Lochy (NOTE: Also the name of the stretch of river between Loch Lochy and the confluence of the River Spean).  In 1875 Gairlochy consisted of “a few houses and locks on the Caledonian Canal.”  There are two sets of Caledonian Canal locks located here, which raise the canal up to the elevation of Loch Lochy.  These are situated out of view from the main road, approximately one-half mile to the northeast.  A small burial ground, Cladh Mucomir, is also located here, primarily containing MacMartins of Letterfinlay (Camerons of Letterfinlay) and others.  It is a familiar landmark for those making the drive from Spean Bridge to Achnacarry.

 

GAIRLOCHY ROAD, THE:

A segment of the B8004 that runs from the Commando Monument, near Spean Bridge, to the Caledonian Canal, at Gairlochy.

 

GAOR GULVAIN / GULVAIN / GAOR BHEINN / GUALA BHEINN / GAOTH-'IL BHEINN / GAOTHAIL BHEINN / GAOTHAR BHEINN:

Shoulder Mountain,” “Mountain of the Lurcher” “Windy Mountain” or “The Hill that is in the Eye of the Wind.”  An “eminence of considerable height and extent” (the highest mountain on Locharkaigside).  Located west of Meall a'Phubuill, between Loch Arkaig and Loch Eil.  

 

GAOTH-'IL BHEINN:

(see: Gaor Gulvain)

 

GARBH-ALLT:

(see: Roughburn)

 

GARBH CHIOCH BEAG:

“The Little Rough Pap.”  A rocky pointed hill or top located approximately ½ mile east of Garbh Chioch Mhor.

 

GARBH CHIOCH MHOR:

“The Large Rough Pap.”  A rocky pointed hill or top located approximately ½ mile southeast of Sgor na Ciche.

 

GARBH CHNAPAN:

Located just south of the head of Loch Treig.

 

GARVAN / GARVIN:

“Rough Water” or “Coarse Bran Meal.”  Formerly a small settlement on the southern shore of Loch Eil, toward its western end.

(also see: Glen Garvan/Glen Garvin)

(also see: South Garvan)

 

GARVAN (RIVER) / ABHAINN GHARBHAIN:

An Ardgour river that is formed by the combined North and South Garvan Rivers.  This river empties into Loch Eil near southwestern head.  

(also see: Garvan – River)

 

GATHERING:
Clansfolk coming together in a large-scaled event, to celebrate their collective Scots heritage.  The “call” for a Gathering is made by either the Chief, for a worldwide Gathering or a Commissioner/Chieftain for a “national” Gathering.
(see: www.clancamerongathering.org)

 

GEAL CHARN:

“Shining White Humped Hill,” “Shining White Cairn” or “White Rocky Hill.”  A prominent hill over which the historic parish boundary between Kilmallie and Kilmonivaig passes.  Located approximately one mile northwest of the head of Gleann Tarsuinn, north of Loch Arkaig.

 

GEARR LEACANN / GEARR LEACHDAINN:

“Short Face,” “Short Slope” or “Short Hillside.”  A piece of pasture land located on the north side of Glen Suileag, south of Meall a’ Phubuill.  Between Allt Fionna Doire and Allt Coire nan Laoigh.

 

GEARR LEACHDANN / GEARR LEACANN:

“Short Face,” “Short Slope” or “Short Hillside.”  A short peak located in Conaglen, just northeast of Corrlarach.  

 

GEARR LOCHAIDH:

(see: Gairlochy)

 

GERRARAN / COILLE NAN GEUR-OIREAN:

“The Wood of the Sharp Edges.”  Ancient forest lands (historically consisting of mixed woods) along the south shore of Loch Arkaig.  Its original boundaries were Eilean a’ Ghiubhais on the east, Glen Camgarry on the west and near Gleann a’ Cham Dhoire to the south.  These forest lands are now greatly dimished from their ancient boundaries.

 

GHILLE MHAOIL:

Ancient name of the MacMillans.  Those MacMillans from Murlaggan and Caillich make up a sept of Clan Cameron.

 

GIBBON:

From the Gilbert sept of Clan Cameron.  This surname is the double diminutive of "Gilbert."

 

GILBERT / GILBERTSON:

A major sept of Clan Cameron.

 

GILLACAMSROIN:

An early form (1467) of the surname Cameron.

 

GLAC NAM MARBH:

“Hollow of the Dead.”  A place, in the vicinity of Cuilchenna, where an illegitimate son of Cameron of Lundavra murdered and buried his two half brothers, in a fit of jealousy.    

 

GLAIC A MHADAIDH:

“Wolf's Hollow.”  Near the head of Loch Arkaig (near Kinlocharkaig).  Said to be the place where, in 1680, Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel killed the last wolf in Lochaber.

 

GLAS BHEINN:

“Grey Mountain.”  Located east of Beinn Mheadhoin, north of the foot of Loch Arkaig.  Elevation: 2398 feet.  Also a place southeast of Loch Eilde Moire and near the head of Glen Roy.

 

GLAS BHEINN:

“Grey Mountain.”  Located southeast of Loch Eilde Moire.  Also a place north of the foot of Loch Arkaig and near the head of Glen Roy.

 

GLAS BHEINN:

 

Grey Mountain.”  Located near the head of Glen Roy.  Also a place southeast of Loch Eilde Moire and north of the foot of Loch Arkaig.

 

GLASDAIR:

(see: Glaster)

 

GLAS DHOIRE:

(see: Glaster)

 

GLAS DHOIRE BEAG:

“The Small Grey Thicket.”  A small portion of moorland located southwest of Glaster (Glas Dhoire) near the west shore of Loch Lochy.

 

GLAS DHOIRE MOR:

“Great Green/Grey Grove” “Great Grey Wood” or “Great Grey Thicket.”  An extensive piece of natural copsewood or thicket (in 1875) located west of Loch Lochy, in the Clunes Forest.

 

GLASTER / GLASDAIR / GLAS DHOIRE:

"The Grey Grove."  A croft near the march between Lochiel's land and Glengarry's, on the western side of Loch Lochy.

 

GLEANN/GLEN:

(interchangeable – search both varients)

 

GLEANN A’ CHAM DHOIRE:

“Glen of the Crooked Grove/Thicket.”  A small glen branching out of Glen Mallie west of An t’Seann Fhrith (The Old Forest) and extending southwest for approximately one mile.

(also see: Allt a’ Cham Dhoire)

(also see: Cam Dhoire)

 

GLEANN A’ CHAORUINN:

“Glen of the Rowan/Mountain Ash.”  Extends from the northern base of Streap about two miles in a northwestern direction to Glen Pean.

 

GLEANN AN DUBH / GLEANNAN DUBH:

Small Dark Valley” or “Small Black Glen.”  A naoorw ravine extending from  Achnasaul on the west to the Caig River on the east.  North of the foot of Loch Arkaig.

 

GLEANN CAMGHARAIDH:

Either "Glen of the Crooked Hide-out," “Glen of the Winding Rough Stream” or "Glen of the Crooked Corpse" (translations widely vary).  Glencamgarry in English.  Located  between the heads of Loch Arakaig and Glen Mallie.  This location is said to be where some of the lost French gold, landed after the Battle of Culloden in 1746, was secretly buried.

 

GLEANN CAOL-LAIRIG:

(see: Glen Collarig)

 

GLEANN CIA-AIG / GLEANN CIABHAIG:

(see: Glen Caig)

 

GLEANN CINGIDH:

(see: Glen Kingie)

 

GLEANN CUIRNEAN / GLEANN CHAORUINN:

“Glen of the Cairn” of “Glen of the Rowan Trees.”  Located southwest of the head of Loch Arkaig, branching off from Glen Pean just west of Tom na h-Iolaire, toward Streap.

 

GLEANN DEIS AIRIDH / GLEANN DEAS-AIRIGH:

(see: Glendessarry)

 

GLEANN DOMHANAIDH / GLEN DONIE:

“Glen of the Hollow Place.”  Runs from near Torlundy eastward into the Leanachan Forest.

 

GLEANN DUBH LIGHE / GLEN DUIBHALIGH:

“The Dark Glen.”  Runs along with the River Dubh Lighe, west of Loch Eil’s head.

 

GLEANN FIONNLIGHE / GLEANN FIONNALIGH:

“Light Glen” “Glen of the White Flood” or “Glen of a White Rocky Place.”  Runs along with the River Fionn Lighe, north of Loch Eil’s head.

 

GLEANN GARBHAIN:

(see: Glen Garvan)

 

GLEANN GHLAOIDH:

(see: Glen Gloy)

 

GLEANN GLAS DHOIRE / GLEN GLAS DHOIRE:

“Green Grove Glen.”  Branches off to the east from Glen Roy at Cranachan.

 

GLEANN GHOBHAR:

(see: Glen Gour)

 

GLEANN IOLAIREAN:

“Glen of the Eagles.”  Located south of the head of Loch Treig.

 

GLEANN LAOIGH:

(see: Glen Loy)

 

GLEANN LARAGAIN / GLEN LARAGAIN:

“Glen of a Little Pass.”  Runs from just north of Meall Bhanabhie southeast toward Tor Castle, along with Allt Sheangain.  Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobite army passed through this glen in August 1745.  Also interchangeably called Glen Sheangain by some local residents over the years.

 

GLEANN NA GIUBHSACHAN:

“Glen of the Fir Tree.”  Runs to the southwest from near Staonaig and Abhainn Rath.

 

GLEANN NA H-IUBHRAICH:

(see: Glen Hurich)

 

GLEANN NEIMHEIS:

(see: Glen Nevis)

 

GLEANN PEATHANN:

(see: Glen Pean)

 

GLEANN PEIGHUNN:

(see: Glen Pean)

 

GLEANN SEILEACH:

Willow Glen.”  Located northeast of Culchenna.

 

GLEANN SUILEAG:

(see: Glen Suileag)

 

GLEANN TARSUINN:

“Crosswise Glen” or “Cross Glen.”  A small glen that extends to the west, toward Beinn Mheadhoin, for approximately one mile from the confluence of Allt Tarsuinn and the River Caig.  North of the foot of Loch Arkaig.

 

GLEN/GLEANN:

(interchangeable – search both varients)

 

GLENAHURICH:

(see: Glen Hurich)

 

GLEN ALBYN:

(see: Great Glen, The)

 

GLEN CAIG / GLEANN CIA-AIG / GLEANN CIABHAIG:

“Glen of the Dark River” or “Glen of the Little Lock of Hair.”   A wooded glen running north and south, lying between Drochaid Chiaaig (Caig Bridge) to the south and the confluence of Allt Tarsuinn and the River Caig to the north.  Over the western end of the Dark Mile.  "Bonnie Prince Charlie" crossed this valley several times.

(also see: Caig Falls)

 

GLENCAMGARRY:

(see: Gleann Camgharaidh)

 

GLENCAMGHARAIDH:

(see: Gleann Camgharaidh)

 

GLEN COLLARIG / GLEANN CAOL-LAIRIG :

“Narrow Pass Glen.”  Branches off from Glen Roy south of Bohuntine and runs general north, then west.  Its head is located near Coire Ionndrainn, west of Achavady.

 

GLEN DESSARRY / GLEANN DEIS AIRIDH / GLEANN DEAS-AIRIGH:

“Glen of the South Sheiling” or “Glen of Right Pastures.”  st of the head of Loch Arkaig, along the river Dessarry, running into the hills of Knoydart and westward towards the head of Loch Nevis; between Lochaber and Knoydart.  A ruin beside the road near Strathan is what remains of a small Hanoverian barracks where a garrison was stations after the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron-MacPhees and Macphies (MacPhees) as tenants.  This glen is cited by some sources as being the ancestral home of the Lochaber MacPhees.

(see: MacPhee)

 

GLENDESSARRY, (THE CAMERONS OF):

The Camerons of Glendessarry were very active in the 1745 Uprising, being a cadet branch of the Camerons of Lochiel.  Their leaders were Hugh Cameron and his famed daughter, Jenny Cameron.  They are said to have "raised" some 200 men for Lochiel's Regiment.  Despite what English propaganda efforts stated, Jenny never actually led "her" men into action at the battles of Prestonpans and Falkirk.  Some accounts have her leading the charge, others have her watching from a far.  In fact, her only Jacobite activities were being an observer at Glenfinnan and possibly attending a ball held by Prince Charles in Edinburgh.  After 1751 she bought property which she named Mount Cameron, there she was buried in 1772.  Glendessarry was upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.

 

GLEN DONIE:

(see: Glean Domhanaidh)

 

GLEN DUBHLIGHE:

(see: Gleann Dubh Lighe)

 

GLEN FINNAN:

Apparently meaning "The Glen of Fingon" - a 14th century abbot of Iona.  The place where the River Finnan meets with Loch Shiel.  Where "Bonnie Prince Charlie" unfurled his standard on August 19, 1745, presumably on a hillock called Torr a' Choit, signaling the beginning of the last Jacobite Rising.  The village is located within Kilmallie Parish, though technically outside of traditional Cameron territory.  There is currently a large monument located here, built in 1815, commemorating the historical event.

 

GLEN FINTAIG / GLEANN FIONNTAIG:

“Glen of the Little White One” (the “White One” is apparently the Fintaig Water, which runs through the center of the glen).  Joins with Glen Gloy at Upper Glenfintaig.  Its head is near the slope of Beinn Laruinn. 

 

GLEN FIONN LIGHTE:

(see: Gleann Fionnlighe)

 

 

GLEN FRUIN (THE BATTLE OF):

February 7, 1603

 

GLEN GARVAN / GLEN GARVIN / GLEANN GARBHAIN:

“Rough Water Glen” or “Glen of Coarse Bran Meal.”  On the southern shore of Loch Eil, towards its western end.

 

GLEN GIUBHSACHAN:

(see: Gleann na Giubhsachan)

 

GLEN GLAS DHOIRE:

(see: Gleann Glas Dhoire)

 

GLEN GLOY / GLEANN GHLAOIDH:

“Glen of a Gluey Substance” (also known in the past as "Nine Mile Water.")  Runs along with the River Gloy, beginning at Invergloy on Loch Lochy and curving northeastward toward Beinn Laruinn.  General Wade's Inverness to Fort William military road ran through this glen.

 

GLEN GOUR / GLEANN-GHOBHAR:

“Goat Glen.”  Located southwest of Corran.

 

GLEN HURICH / GLEANN NA H-IUBHRAICH:

“Glen of the Yew Trees/Woods.”  Runs from Loch Shiel into the hills of Ardgour.  Home to the Camerons of Dungallon.

 

GLEN IOLAIREAN:

(see: Gleann Iolairean)

 

GLEN KINGIE / GLEANN CINGIDH / GLEANN A’ CHINGIDH:

A “big strath” possibly meaning “Glen of the Champion.”  Located between Loch Arkaig and Loch Quoich, extending from the head of Glen Garry for approximately 10 miles to the west.  Location of a “tack” of land, which Dr. Archibald Cameron, of 1745 fame owned.  Prince Charles Edward Stuart spent two nights here following the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

 

GLEN LARAGAIN:

(see: Gleann Laragain)

 

GLEN LIVIT (THE BATTLE OF):

1594

 

GLEN LOY / GLEANN LAOIGH:

"Glen of the Calf" or “Calf’s Glen.”  Located along with the River Loy and is home to such old settlements as Barr, Strone, Banavie and Moy.  The River Loy runs to the southeast before merging with the River Lochy at Strone.  Part of the ancient "Disputed Lands" between the Camerons and Mackintoshes, in the Loch Arkaig catchment area.  Home to a sizable number of MacGillonie-Camerons in generations past.

 

GLEN MALLIE / GLEANN MAILIDH:

Possibly “Glen of the Bare Summit.”  A narrow glen stretching from Invermallie approximately nine miles west to the watershed.  At one time a great fir forest on the southern side of Loch Arkaig, along the River Mallie.  The glen carries the river east through the Lochiel Forest, before it heads northeast to Loch Arkaig.  Approximately three miles from Achnacarry.

 

GLENMORISTON:

Several MacSorlie-Cameron families settled here during the time of the XIII or XIV Chief of Clan Cameron, during which time there was a close friendship between the Lochiels and the Chiefs of Grant.  Duncan Cameron, of Canadian North West Trading Company fame, was a Glenmoriston Cameron.

 

GLEN NEVIS / GLEANN NEIMHEIS / GLEANN NIBHEIS / GLEANN NIMHEIS:

A beautiful rugged fissure of rock, grass and timber, with fine streams of crystal-clear water dashing down the hillsides, less than three miles from Fort William, along the River Nevis.  A ravine in "the welts of Ben Nevis's hide," on its western face, that stretches 22 miles from Fort William to Loch Treighead.  Down the glen runs the Water of the Nevis.

(also see: Ben Nevis)

(also see: Samuel's Cave)

 

GLENNEVIS, (THE CAMERONS OF):

This family can be found in Lochaber as far back as records go, holding lands from Clan Gordon.  Their residence, Dun Dige, was located "on a moated hillock in a clearing of deer grass in Glen Nevis."  One tradition states that Cameron of Glenevis "held" his lands by the tenure of an unfailing snowball when demanded - probably a "tall tale" of sorts.   The Camerons of Glenevis and of Lochiel were generally "at feud" with each other for countless generations.  One theory states that this family was originally not Cameron at all, but MacDonalds who settled there.  The head of the family kept out of the Rising of 1745 from "prudential motives," though members of the family and most of the followers of Glen Nevis joined the standard of Lochiel on that occasion.   Regardless of his personal actions, Alexander Cameron of Glenevis was imprisoned for about one year for the actions of his family.  His residence, Glen Nevis House, was burned in 1746 by a party of men under the command of Captain Caroline Scott, of Guise's Regiment.  Their burial places were at Tom-eas-an-T'slinnean and Achnacon.

(see: MacSorley)

(also see: Camghou Ran)

 

GLEN PEAN / GLEN PEIN / GLEANN PEATHANN / GLEANN PEIGHUNN / GLEN PEIGHINN / GLEANN PEATHANN:

“Pennyland Glen” or – commonly in the past - “The Three Peny Lands of Glenpean.”  A large but narrow glen leading westward from the head of Loch Morar - west of the west end of Loch Arkaig, along the River Pean.  The river (which was known for its salmon fishing in generations past) rises in the foothills of Sgurr nan Coireachan and then flows north then northeasterly through Glen Pean, before joining the River Dessary.  The River Dessary, in turn, empties into Loch Arkaig east of the village of Strathan.  In 1875 there was a shepherd’s house by the name “Glenpean” located approximately 2 ¾ miles from the bottom of Glen Pean.

 

GLENPEANBEG:

(see: Glenpeinbeg)

 

GLENPEANMORE:

(see: Glenpeinmore)

 

GLEN PEINBEG / GLENPEINBEGG / GLENPEANBEG:

“Lesser/Small Glen Pean.”  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons as tenants.  A branch of the MacGillonies resided here, from the mid seventeenth century until the early nineteenth century.

 

GLEN PEINMORE / GLENPEANMORE:

"Greater/Big Glen Pean."  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacMillans and McIleveules (MacMillans) as tenants.

 

GLEN REE / GLEANN RIGHE:

“Glen at the Base of a Mountain.”  Located northeast of Culchenna.

 

GLEN ROY / GLEANN RUAIDHE:

“Glen of the Red River.”  Runs along with the River Roy, which meets the River Spean at Roy Bridge.  This area has been noted in the past for its unusual geological feature, known as the "Parallel Roads."  The "Roads" were once thought to have been the work of "Fairies," but are now known to mark the successive beaches of a glacial lake which dropped as the ice retreated.

 

GLEN SCADDLE / GLEANN SGARBHDAL / GLEANN SKAFFADELL / GLEANN SKAFFERDILL:

“Cormorant-Dale Glen.”  Possibly derived from the Norse words “Scarfr” – cormorant and “Dalr” – dale.  Located souoth of Conaglen, running generally westward from the intersection with Conaglen near Aryhoulan.   

 

GLEN SHELLACH:

Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron, MacDonald and MacKenzie tenants.

 

GLEN SHEANGAIN:

(see: Gleann Laragain)

 

GLENSHIEL (THE BATTLE OF):

June 10, 1719

 

GLEN SPEAN / GLEANN SPIATHAN / GLEN SPIATHAIN:

“Hawthorn Glen” or “Glen of the Smell.”  Located along the River Spean, leading to the northern boundary of Lochaber.  

 

GLENSUILEAG / GLEANN SUILEAG / GLEN SULAIG:

“Sallow Plant Glen,” “Glen of the Deep Pool,” ‘Glen of the notched/serrated eye,” “Little Oriface Glen” or “Glen of the Little Eye” (translations widely vary).  A large but narrow winding glen that extends from just north of Fassifern, along An t-Suileag for about four miles.  It streches from where the watershed divides Glen Loy to the east and Gleann Suileag to the west.  The Jacobite army is thought to have marched through this glen and also Glenloy during the early days of the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion.  One source states that MacSorlies lived in this glen prior to 1456.

 

GLEN TURRET / GLEANN TURRAID:

“Glen of the Little Dry One.”  Located near the head of Glen Roy.

 

GLOY:

(see: Glen Gloy)

(also see: Invergloy)

 

GLOY (RIVER) / ABHAINN GHLAOIDH:

“River of a Gluey Substance” (also known in the past as “Nine Mile Water.”)  Runs along with Glen Gloy, beginning east of Auchivarie and curving southwestward toward Invergloy, where it empties into Loch Lochy.  General Wade's Inverness to Fort William military road ran near this river.

 

 

GOIRTEAN A’ CHLADAICH:

“Little Field Beside the Shore.”  Located northeast of Conaglen House (formerly Inverscaddle House).

 

GOIRTEAN AN T-SALAINN:

“Little Field of the Salt.”  Located west of Achdalieu.  A salmon kippery was located at this place in the past.

 

GOIRTEAN FRIDEIG:

“Fridda’s Little Field.”  Located at North Ballachulish.  A wooden (possibly the former prow to a Viking ship) effigy of the Norse goddess Fridda was found buried at this place in the late 19th century.

 

GOIRTEAN NAN CRAOBH:

“Field of the Trees.”  A point of land along Loch Lochy’s western shore, covered with natural copse (in 1875) located approximately one mile northeast of Clunes, in the Clunes Forest,

 

GOIRTEAN ODHAR:

“Dun Colored Little Field.”  Located approximately one mile north of Fort William, this place is cited as being where Montrose won the Battle of Inverlochy in 1645.  In more recent years it was home to the British Aluminum Company’s Lochaber factory.

 

GORDONSBURGH:

(see: Maryburgh)

 

GORMSHUIL / GORMLA / GORMSHUIL MHOR NA MAIGHE / GORMELIA:

The name of a "good" witch, (roughly translated, her name means "Blue Eye," with her formal name in Gaelic translated as meaning "Great Gormshuil of Moy").  Despite some indications (derived from a folk tale of Lochaber "witches" sinking an invading Viking ship in Loch Linnhe) that she was an adult already circa 1588, Gormshuil Cameron seems to have been born circa 1590-1600.  Researchers have theorized that she was born in/a resident of Wester Moy, and married a MacKinnon of Easter Moy, with at least one son resulting from their union.  She seems to have been protective to the Clan Cameron and its chiefs, and often warned them of dangers and disasters to come. Some references imply a blood connection with Lochiel, suggesting that they were in fact kinsfolk - she was well thought of in Lochaber, not feared as much as respected as a "wise woman."  She died in an accidental drowning in the Allt Coire Choille-ros, while on her way to visit with Lochiel at Achnacarry, sometime after 1665 (since Achnacarry was built by Sir Ewen in this year).  Gormshuil is commonly referred to as the "Witch of Moy."  Her name is pronounced "Gorm-hool."

(see: Moy)

(also see: Cat Pool, Cat Rapids)

 

GORMSHUIL BEND:

A bend in the Caledonian Canal, near Moy.  The story goes that when the canal was being built that workers refused to cut through (and thus exhume) any of the bodies in the old Moy (MacKinnon) cemetery at Moy, in fear of the spirit of Gormshuil, the Witch of Moy, who is said to have been buried there.  As such, the canal takes a distinct bend at Moy, to avoid the burial ground.

 

GRAY MARE’S TAIL:

Waterfalls and rapids located on Allt Creag Innis nam Bo/Bord, located just south of Creag Innis nam Bo/Bord.

 

GREAT GLEN, THE:

A colossal geological fault north of Fort William that splits the scenery from Fort William up to Inverness.  It divides the Highlands into two parts: to the south, the Southern Highlands, comprising the Grampian and Monadhliath ranges; to the north, the Northern and Western Highlands.  The Caledonian Canal traverses the entire length of Glenalbyn, otherwise known as the Great Glen.

 

GREY CORRIES:

A mountain range continuation of the Ben Nevis mountain range, located northeast of Ben Nevis and Aonach Mor.

 

GRODAIG:

 

“Rotten Bay.”  Located adjacent to Breuncamus, at the head of Loch Linnhe.

 

(also see: Breuncamus)

 

GUALA BHEINN:

(see: Gaor Gulvain)

 

GUISACH / GUISACHAN / COILLE NA GUIBHSAICH / COILLE A’ GHIUBHAIS:

"The Pine Forest," “Fir Wood” or “Place of the Firs.”  The name applied to an extensive piece of old woodland, consisting of (in 1875) fir and hardwood.  This remnant of the Caledonian Forest runs along the south side of Loch Arkaig from Eilean a’ Ghiubhais to near Invermallie.

 

GULVAIN:

(see: Gaor Gulvain)

 

GULVEN:

(see: Gaor Gulvain)

 

HALLIDON HILL (THE BATTLE OF):

July 5, 1333

 

HARLAW (THE BATTLE OF):

1411

 

HAUGHS OF CROMDALE:

In Strathspey, where in the spring of 1689 a Cameron "contingent" was surprised and routed by William of Orange's forces.

 

HIGHBRIDGE:

Just southeast of Brackletter, west of Spean Bridge, near the River Spean.  The original bridge built in this location was completed in 1736 by General Wade (as part of his Inverness to Fort William road) and consisted of three arches, to span the narrow but deep gorge on the River Spean.  Only the piers remain, as the bridge is in ruin.  The first action of the 1745 Jacobite Uprising took place here, when Jacobites ambushed a party of Hanoverians. 

 

HILL OF DISPUTE, (THE):

(see: Meall an Tagraidh)

 

HILTON, (THE CAMERONS OF):

A small hamlet, near the Inverness/Ross-shire border, just north of Beauly.  It is said that many of the "goodly" number of Camerons in this area can be traced back to the year 1598, when one of Cameron of Lochiel's daughters traveled north to marry Duncan MacKenzie of Hilton.  It was customary for a daughter of a landed family to have a protective escort; in this instance a number of Cameron men accompanied her.  These men settled in the Beauly-Conan basin.

(also see: Kincardine Parish, Abernethy Parish)

 

HURICH:

(see: Glen Hurich)

 

[Back to Top]

 

I-J

 

 

I MBUN EASA:

(see: Monessie)

 

INBHIR GHLAOIDH:

(see: Invergloy)

 

INBHIR LAIRE:

(see: Inverlair)

 

INBHIR LOCHAIDH:

(see: Inverlochy)

 

INBHIR MHAILIDH:

(see: Invermallie)

 

INBHIR RUAIDHE:

(see: Inverroy)

 

INBHIR UISG’ A’ MHUILINN:

(see: Inverskilavulin)

 

INCH / INSH / INNIS:

“Riverside Meadow.”  Located in Glen Spean, west of Chlianaig.

 

INCHREE / INNIS RIGHE:

“Meadow at the Base of a Mountain.”  Located northeast of Culchenna.

 

INCH OF PERTH, (BATTLE AT THE):

(see: North Inch of Perth)

 

INNERLUI:

(see: Invergloy) 

 

INNIEMORE:

In Strontian, on the Morven peninsula, at the eastern end of Loch Sunart (An t-Aoineadh Mor in Gaelic.)  This village was populated by Camerons and had links going back to the 1745 Rebellion.  In 1824 the settlement at Inniemore was cleared to make way for sheep, and for the most part forgotten about for decades.  In 1994, while an area of trees on the Morvern peninsula were being felled, workers discovered the remains of dwelling houses dating from the early 19th century.  A local historian, Ian Thornber, identified them as belonging to Inniemore.

 

INNIS:

(see: Inch)

 

INSH:

(see: Inch)

 

INVERAILORT, (THE CAMERONS OF):

The Camerons of Inverailort claim to have originally "sprung" from the family of Erracht.  The first known family member was Donald Cameron, who resided at Murlaggan.  Inverailort House, residence of the head of this family, was initially used as the British military's "Irregular Warfare School" from May 1940 until February 1942.  At that time the Commando Basic Training Centre was established at Achnacarry.  Inverailort then became a special training school and depot for the SOE.

 

INVERGLOY / INNERLUI / INBHIR GHLAOIDH:

“Confluence of the River Gloy.”  Located where the River Gloy meets with Loch Lochy.  Directly eastward (across Loch Lochy) from Clunes.  In 1805 there were 34 Cameron-MacMartin Dochanassies living in or near Invergloy.   

 

INVERLAIR / INBHIR LAIRE:

“Confluence of the Lair.”  Located near Tulloch in Glen Spean.

 

INVERLOCHY / INVERLOCHIE / INBHIR LOCHAIDH:

“Confluence of the River Lochy.”  The NAME of an English garrison/fort, under General Monk, that was almost constantly harried by the Camerons, which in actuality was located where Fort William's fort would be built later.  A common misunderstanding has this early fort placed at Inverlochy, but it was only given this name based on the nearest settlement at the time.

 

The fort of Inverlochy was given to Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, by withdrawing English forces, in 1660.  Eventually the old fort was replaced by a new fort, named for the King - Fort William.  An early sixteenth century author, Henry Boerce, claimed that there was at one time a rich trading town at Inverlochy, but that it was laid waste by invading Danes.

 

A present day village, north of Fort William.

 

INVERLOCHY, (THE BATTLE OF):

Battles taking place in both January 1431 and on February 2, 1645.

 

INVERLOCHY CASTLE:

An ancient castle (now mostly in ruin) said to have originally been built by Picts.  Located on the banks of the River Lochy, just off the present-day A-82.  Site of the murder of the untrustworthy Ewen Cameron of Erracht by the followers of Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron.  An instrumental event in the return of Allan Cameron, 16th Chief of Clan Cameron, in the 1580's.  The Battle of Inverlochy was fought on the castle grounds in 1645.

 

INVERMALLIE / INVERMALLY / INBHIR MHAILIDH:

“Mouth/Confluence of the River Mallie.”  A piece of enclosed pasture ground (in 1875) just west of Achnacarry on the south shore of Loch Arkaig, at the entrance of Glen Mallie, where the River Mallie enters the loch.  A branch of the MacGillonies resided here, from the sixteenth century until the eighteenth century. Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacGillonie-Camerons as tenants.

 

INVERNAHAVON, (THE BATTLE OF):

Circa 1370 or 1387

 

INVERROY / BUN ROY / INBHIR RUAIDHE:

“Confluence of the Red River.”  On the north side of the River Spean, west of Roy Bridge.

 

INVERSCADDLE:

One of the eighteenth century homes of the Cameron of Fassifern family was located here, and both Sir Ewen Cameron of Fassifern and his son (Colonel John Cameron of Quatre Bras fame) lived here at one time.   It appears that this home was the residence of the oldest sons of the Fassifern family, and that they typically moved to Fassifern House upon their father’s death.  The family was recorded as having a “tack” of land at Inverscaddle.  Nothing remains of old Inverscaddle House; its stones were used to build Conaglen House.  

 

INVERSCADDLE BAY:

Located about five miles north of Corran Narrows, along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, where the united waters of the River Scaddle and River Cona enter the loch.

 

INVERSKILAVULIN / INVERUISKVULLIN / INVERUISKAVOULINE / INVERSKIL A ‘MHUILINN / INBHIR UISG A’ MHUILINN:

“Mouth of Water at the Mill” or “Confluence of the Mill Burn.”  Located in Glen Loy, between Erracht and Achnanellan.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.  In 1875 there was a dwelling house in this location, with offices attached (“partly slated and partly thatched”) owned by Cameron of Lochiel.  A branch of the MacGillonie-Camerons resided here, from the fifteenth century until the early nineteenth century. This place was also home to the last Cameron of Letterfinlay, who lived here circa 1864. 

 

INVERSKILAVULIN BRIDGE:

(see: Drochaid Inverskilavulin)

 

ISLAND COLUMBKILL:

(see: Eilean Loch Arkaig)

 

ISLAND OF LOCH EIL:

(see: Eilean nan Craobh)

 

ISLAND OF SAINT COLUMB(A):

(see: Eilean Loch Arkaig)

 

[Back to Top]

 

K-L

 

 

KAMERUM / DeKAMERUM:

A Lowland Scots version of the surname Cameron, circa 1214-49.

 

KARI’S CAPE:

(see: Carnais)

 

KAYNISH:

On the north shore of Loch Arkaig, west of Achnasoul.

 

KEANAVOIR:

(see: Kenmore)

 

KEANAWOOD:

On the north shore of Loch Arkaig, west of Achnasoul.

 

KEIL:

 

A small settlement in the Appin District, on the southeast shore of Loch Linnhe between Glen Duror and Salachan Glen.  It is the burial place of James Stewart, who was wrongfully hanged for the 1752 Appin Murder.  Also a farm site, located on the western shoreline of Loch Linnhe, south of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

 

KEIL:

A farm located on the western shoreline of Loch Linnhe, south of Inverscaddle Bay.  Also a small settlement in the Appin District, on the southeast shore of Loch Linnhe.

 

KENMORE / KEANAVOIR  / A’ CHEANN MHOR:

“Big Headland,” “Head, Big” or “Headland of the Wall.”  Located just east of Culcairn's Brae, along the north shore of Loch Arkaig.  Legend has it that this place was or is haunted.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788. When surveyed in 1772 Kenmore’s gravelly soil was fertilized by tathing (confining livestock to manure the land) and laying fern fronds.  It was then sown with oats and corn.

 

KENNEDY:

Kennedys from Lianachan make up a sept of Clan Cameron.

 

KEPPANACH / CEAPANACH:

“Little Snare Field.”  Located southwest of Inchree. 

 

KEPPOCH / CEAPACH:

Tillage Plot Land.”  Located near the junction of Glen Spean and Glen Roy.  The old Keppoch was located approximately 1 ½ miles northeast of Roy Bridge, at Torran nan Ceap.

 

KIACHNISH RIVER / KIACHNISH WATER / CIOCHNIS / CIOCH INNIS / UISGE CHIACHNIS:

“Misty Promontory Water.”  A scenic, meandering river that originates at Loch Lundavra and flows north and then west before falling into Loch Linnhe near Coruanan.

 

KILACHOIREIL / KINCHOIREIL / CILL CHOIREIL / KILKARILL:

Commonly believed to be "Church of St. Cyril," though there is a very remote possibility that it was originally dedicated to St. Cairill.  Located in Roy Bridge.  Thought to be the location of one of six chapels that Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, was directed to build by the Pope, circa 1639, in order to "expiate his sins" from so many years of Highland battle and conflict.   The Kilchoireal burial ground is located on the summit of a rounded hill further east in Glen Spean, just northeast of Achluachrach.

 

KILCHOAN:

"Church of St. Congan" (variations include Comgan or Coan), who founded a monastery in Lochalsh after being banished from Ireland in the 8th century and was buried on Iona.  Located in Knoydart.  Thought to be the location of one of six chapels that Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, was directed to build by the Pope, circa 1639, in order to "expiate his sins" from so many years of Highland battle and conflict.

 

KILDONAN / KILDONNAN:

"Church of St. Donan," an Irish monk who founded a community on Eigg but was eventually martyred there in 618.  Thought to be the location of one of six chapels that Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, was directed to build by the Pope, circa 1639, in order to "expiate his sins" from so many years of Highland battle and conflict.

 

KILELLIE / KILELLICK / CILL-EALAIG:

“Cell of St. Elloc.”  A placename from the past located within the early and ancient boundaries of Corpach and now within modern day Caol. 

 

KILKARILL:

(see: Kilachoireil)

 

KILKELLAN:

In Laggan.  Thought to be the location of one of six chapels that Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, was directed to build by the Pope, circa 1639, in order to "expiate his sins" from so many years of Highland battle and conflict.

 

KILLEVAODAIN:

(see: Cill Mhaodain)

 

KILLICHWIMAN:

(see: Fort William)

 

KILLIECHONATE /KILLIECHONNET / CILL-CHONAID:

“Cell of St. Conat” or “Cell of the Little Hound.”  Located near the River Spean in the Braes of Lochaber, just east of Spean Bridge.

 

KILLIECHONATE FOREST:

South of Leanachan Forest, among the heights of Aonach Mor and Stob Coire Easain.

 

KILLIECRANKIE, (THE BATTLE OF):

July 27, 1689

 

KILLIROSS:

(see: Coille-ros)

 

KILMALLIE / KILMALIE / KILMALYN / KILMALDE / KILMALZIE / KILMAILZE / KILMALZHE / CILL MHAILLIDH / CILL MAOLAIN:

Church of Saint Mhaillidh,” “Church of the Black Monk” or “Cell of Saint Maolan.”  Up until the late 19th century Kilmallie was a distinct place name, but is now municipally considered within the boundaries of Corpach.  Its early and original boundaries stretched from near the present day Caledonian Canal to Bungalow Hillock, just north of the main entrance of the old pulp mill.  After the construction of the canal, the Kilmallie settlement came to be known as Corpach.  In addition to the lesser-known municipality of Kilmallie, this name is more widely known as a parish - the largest geographic parish (sixty miles in length and thirty miles in extreme breadth) in Scotland, partly in the County of Inverness and county of Argyll.  Before the mid-1600's it combined with Kilmonivaig Parish to form Lochaber Parish.  Encompasses most of Clan Cameron's traditional territory.

Several churches have existed near the site of the present building.  There is also an obelisk erected to the memory of Colonel John Cameron of Fassifern, who fell at the Battle of Waterloo.  Thought to be the location of one of six chapels that Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron, was directed to build by the Pope, circa 1639, in order to "expiate his sins" from so many years of Highland battle and conflict.

An old enclosure (ruins, a portion of the aforementioned circa 1639 church) in the church parish graveyard, 20' by 16' in size, is an early burial place for the Camerons of Lochiel and many of their most honored supporters.

 

KILMONIVAIG / CILL-MO-NAOMHAIG:

“Cell of Naomhag” or “Church of the Little Saint.”  There are both ancient and modern locations for this placename.  The old church and burial ground were located just southwest of Gairlochy, on the eastern side of the River Lochy.  The modern location and burial ground are located between the village of Spean Bridge and the Commando Memorial, between the River Spean and the A-82.

 

KILMORACK, (THE CAMERONS OF):

Possibly a branch of the Camerons of Hilton.  Settled in Kilmorack and Kirkhill parishes (near Beauly).  One of their progenitors was a Kenneth Cameron, born circa 1777 in Urquhart Parish.

 

KINBREACK / CEANN BHREAC:

“Speckled Headland.”  Located in Glen Kingie, on the pass from the head of Loch Arkaig to Loch Quoich.

 

KINCARDINE PARISH:

Unified parish (Abernethy and Kincardine) in Clan Grant territory.  Home to a sizable population of Camerons, said to be descended from 12 young Camerons who escorted a lady of the House of Lochiel to marry a Stewart of Kincardine in the mid-1500's. It has been suggested that one of these men might have been Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron and his followers.  Similar to the history of the Camerons of Hilton.

 

KING AND COUNTRY, FOR:

Ancient motto of Clan Cameron.

(see: Motto or Crest)

 

KINGIE / CHINGIDH:

(see: Glen Kingie)

 

KINGIE (RIVER) / ABHAINN CHINGIDH:

“River of the Champion.”  A moderate sized river flowing through Glen Kingie to its confluence with the River Garry.

 

KINLOCHARKAIG / CEANN LOCH AIRCEIG:

“Head of Loch Arkaig.”  The location of Sir Ewen Cameron's famed Great Deer Drive, which took place in about 1655.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacMillans, MacOilduiys (MacMillans) and McIlevails (MacMillans) as tenants. 

 

KINLOCHIEL / CEANN LOCH IAL:

“Head of Loch Eil.”  A small settlement located at the northwestern end of Loch Eil, of the northern shore, one-half mile from the head of the loch (Drumasallie is at the head of Loch Eil) even though the place name indicates that it is AT the head of the loch.  The Jacobite army halted here for the night of August 21, 1745, after leaving Glenfinnan.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.

 

KINLOCHIEL, (THE CAMERONS OF):

This tribe of Clan Cameron was descended from John Dow/Dubh M'Ewen, one of the sons of Ewen Allanson Cameron of Lochiel, XIII Chief of Clan Cameron.  The Camerons of Kinlochiel lived at Drumasallie for centuries.

 

KIN-LOCH-LOCHY, (THE BATTLE OF):

1544

 

KINLOCHQUOICH:

“Head of Loch Quoich.”  Located northwest of Loch Arkaig and Glen Kingie. 

 

KIRKHILL, (THE CAMERONS OF):

(see: Kilmorack, The Camerons of)

 

KOWILKNAP:

(see: Callop)

 

KYLACHIE:

(see: Caillich)

 

KYLE ROSE:

(see: Coille-ros)

 

KYLINROSS:

(see: Coille-ros)

 

LAGGANFERN / LAGGANFERNA / LAGAN FEARNA:

“Hollow of the Alder Trees” or “Alderwood Dell.”  Located just southwest of Kinlocharkaig, at the west end of Loch Arkaig.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.

 

LAIRIG LEACACH:

“Stony Pass.”  Between the eastern-most of the two Stob Coire Easain's and Stob Choire Claurih, along Allt na Lairige.

 

LAIRIG MHOR:

(see: Larigmore)

 

LAOGHAIRE:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

LAOIGH:

(see: Loy)

 

LARIGMORE / LAIRIG MHOR:

“Big Pass.”  Located in the Mamore Deer Forest, northwest of Beinn na Caillich.

 

LAROCH:

(see: Ballachulish)

 

LEABA DHONNACHA DHUIBH A MHONAIDH:

"The Bed of Black Duncan of the Mountains."  A cliff ledge at the head of Loch Rannoch, where Duncan Dhu Cameron and Ian Dubh Cameron, Jacobite soldiers, sought refuge, circa 1753.

 

LEAC AN T-SNEACHDA:

“Hillside of the Snow.”  Located north of Aonach Mor’s summit, in one of the Nevis Range’s more popular ski run areas.

 

LEAC CHORRACH:

“The Precipitous Hillside.”  A “bold, rocky” portion of moor-land north of Clunes.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

LEAC NA BUIDHEIG:

“Hillside of the Yellowhammer” or “Hillside of the Yellow Flowers.”  The slope of a hill on the south side of Gleann Camgharaidh, northeast of Lochan a’ Chomhlain.

 

LEAC NA CARNAICH:

“Hillside of the Cairns.”  The slopes of a hill located south of the head of Loch Arkaig, between Gleann Cuirnean and Gleann Camgharaidh.

 

LEAC NA FUAIRE:

“The Cold Hillside.”  Located on the west side of Meall a’ Choire Ghlais and lying between Allt Coire nan Laogh and Allt an t-Seilich.

 

LEAC NA POLL DHUBH / LEACNAPOLDHU:

“Declevity (a downward slope or downhill path) of the Dark Hole or Pool.”  Located southwest of Spean Bridge and south of Auchnabobanne.

 

LEAC-NAN-SAIGHID (THE BATTLE OF):

1625

 

LEANACHAN / LIANACHAN:

“Head of the Wet Plain” or “Little Meadow.”  Located two miles south of the Spean Bridge/Fort William road, the turning being a mile west of Spean Bridge.  In the past there were two Leanachans – Leanachan Mor and Leanachan Beag – both near each other.  These lands were formerly settled by Kennedies.

(also see: Kennedy)

 

LEANACHAN FOREST / LIANACHAN FOREST:

“Forest at the Head of the Wet Plain” or “Little Meadow Forest.”  Extending south from Spean Bridge toward Torlundy and the heights of Aonach Mor and Stob Choire Claurigh.

(also see: Lianachan)

 

LEARG NAN LEACANN:

“Little Hill of the Broad Slopes.”  Located west of Loch Treig.

 

LEARY:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

LEINDALLIE / LEINDALBIE:

(see: Lindallie)

 

LEITIR FINLAY / LEITIR FHIONNLAIGH:

(see: Letterfinlay)

 

LETTERFINLAY / LEITIR FHIONNLAIGH:

“Finlay's Slope.”  Located along the eastern banks of Loch Lochy, at its midpoint.  In generations past this place was home to the chieftains of the MacMartin tribe of Clan Cameron (occasionally known as “Martins of the Slope”).  A Village upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.

(also see: MacMartin)

 

"LET US UNITE"/UNITE:

Motto of Clan Cameron "Aonaibh Ri Cheile"

 

LEUM AN TAILLEAR:

“Leap of the Tailor,” near the banks of the Caledonian Canal, at Gairlochy.   Location where Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron made his famous leap across a wide boggy ditch, while being pursued by a body of Clan Macintosh, most notably MacKintosh himself (who fell into what was named after him, Lochan Mhic-an Toisich).

 

LEUM UILLEIM:

“William’s Leap.”  Located east of Beinn Bhreac.

 

L'HEUREUX:

The French "St. Malo" privateer that transported Prince Charles Edward Stuart, Donald Cameron, 19th of Lochiel, his brother Dr. Archibald Cameron and more than 100 other Jacobite leaders from Loch nan Uamh in the early morning hours of September 20, 1746, to an exile in France.

 

LIANACHAN:

(see: Leanachan)

 

LINDALLIE / LEINDALLIE / LEINDALBIE / LUNDALLIE / LEAN DALACH:

“Haugh Meadow.”  Located near old Kilmonivaig, south of Gairlochy.   

 

LINDAVRAH:

(see: Lundavra)

 

LOAN / LON:

Anglicized from “Lon,” “A Marsh.”  A shepherd’s house (in 1875) located at the foot of Coire nan Gall and nearly a mile from Loch a’ Chliabhain (now part of Loch Quoich). 

 

LOCHABER / LOCH APAR / LOQUABRIA / LOQUHABER:

"Cameron Country" - the mountainous district of southern Inverness-shire, roughly 12 by 16 miles (4,864 square kilometers).  The place name is thought to mean either "Loch of the Confluences," or "Lake of the Marsh."  A large part of Lochaber lies on the west side of the Lochy basin (which forms the Southern end of Glen Albyn, The Great Glen), though a portion is also straddled between Glenalbyn and Perthshire and Argyll.  Lochaber also runs from the islands of Rhum, Muck and Eigg in the west, deep into the central Highlands in the east.

In 1975, due to the Local Government Reorganization, the borders of Lochaber were redrawn to include Ardnamurchan, Morvern and Ardgour.

 

LOCH ABER:

In centuries past, seemingly a small, now dried up loch, just north of Loch Eil.  Said to be the namesake of this district, though this is now believed to not be accurate.  It may also have been the original name of a small loch, long gone, that is said to have been at the junction of the rivers Lochy and Nevis.  Others believe that it was a "lakelet" in Moine Mhor, the Large Moss, near the mouth of the River Lochy, before the River Lochy entered Loch Linnhe.

 

LOCHABER STONES:

Soft mica schist rock, impregnated with garnets.  In the past these stones were quarried at Bruniachan, in Glen Roy, and were ideal for quern stones, which were used for grinding corn and grains throughout the Highlands.

 

LOCH A' BHLAIR:

(see: Loch Blair)

 

LOCH A’ CHOIRE GHLAIS:

Loch of the Grey Corry.”  A small loch located in Coire Glas (Coire Ghlais).  North of Loch Arkaig.

 

LOCHAN A' CHLAIDHEIMH / LOCHAN A' CLAIDHEIMH:

“Sword Lochan” or “Little Loch of the Sword.”  A small loch which marks the extreme southeastern boundary of the Clan Cameron lands of yesteryear.  Located just south of Carn Dearg.  The location of a highly contested clan boundary dispute between Lochiel and the Earl of Atholl, an incident from which the Clan Cameron “Rallying Cry” quite possibly originated.  In contention were the summer grazing rights on Ben Vreck.  There is said to be a sword at the bottom of this loch, which symbolizes Cameron ownership of this loch, even though the land was disposed of long ago.

 

LOCHAN A’ CHOMHLAIN:

“The Small Loch of the Gathering” or “Little Loch of the Company.”  Located at the southern extremity of Gleann Camgharaidh, roughly between the heads of Loch Arkaig and Loch Eil.

 

LOCHAN A’ MHAIM:

“Little Loch of the Round Steep Hill.”  Located southwest of Sgor nan Coireachan.

 

LOCHAN AN FHITHICH:

“The Small Loch of the Raven.”  A small pool located on the historic parish boundary between Kilmallie and Kilmonivaig, east of Sgor Choinich. 

 

LOCHAN AN FHUDAIR:

“The Small Loch of the Powder.”  A small loch located on the watershed, approximately 1 ½ miles north of the head of Glen Caig.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

LOCHAN COIRE NA CISTE:

“Small Loch of the Corrie of the Box / Chest.”  Located between the summits of Ben Nevis and Carn Dearg. 

 

LOCHAN DRUIM NA GIUBHSAICH / LOCHAN DRUIM A’ GHIUBHAIS / LOCHAN DRUIM NA GUISACH:

“The Lochan of Guisach Ridge” or “Black Loch of Firs.”  A small “sheet” of water situated approximately one mile northwest of Glenmallie.  Located off the southwestern edge of Guisach (The Pine Forest).

 

LOCHAN DUBH:

“Small Black Loch” or “Dark Little Loch.”  A small “sheet” or loch of fresh water located approximately ¼ mile north of Loch Blair.  

 

LOCHAN LEAC AN IOBHAIR:

Hillside Lochan of the Yew Woods.”  Located west of Sgurr an Iobhair, in Ardgour, just north of Cona Glen. 

 

LOCHAN LEUM AN T-SAGAIRT:

“Little Loch of the Priests Jump.”  A small loch approximately 1/3 in length, located about 1 ¼ miles west of Glenpean.

 

LOCHAN MEALL AN T-SUIDHE / LOCHAN T-SUIDHE / LOCHAN MEALL AN T-SITHIDH:

“Hill of the Seat Loch” or “Hill of the Stormy Blast.”  A body of water which lies in the hollow between Meall an T-Suidhe and "Upper" Ben Nevis.  A very visable wandmark to anyone ascending the Tourist Trail of Ben Nevis.

(also see: Allt Coire an Lochain) 

 

LOCHAN MHIC-AN TOISICH:

A ditch into which the chief of Clan Macintosh fell while in pursuit of Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron.  Donald was successful in his own leap (see: Leum an Taillear) and actually showed mercy to his enemy, assisting him out of the ditch.  MacKintosh returned the favor by not sending forward his men in pursuit of the lone Cameron.

 

LOCHAN NA BEINNE BAINE / LOCH NA BEINN BAINE:

“The Small Loch of the White Mountain” or “Loch of the Fair Ben.”  A small lochan located on the east side of Meall a’ Bhlair, north of Loch Arkaig.

 

LOCHAN NAN TRI CHRIOCH:

(see: Lochan Tri Chrioch)

 

LOCHAN STAIC:

“Loch of the Steep Rock.”  A small loch located north of Loch Blair.  

 

LOCHANTEE:

(see: Lochan T-Suidhe)

 

LOCHAN TRI CHRIOCH / LOCHAN NAN TRI CHRIOCH:

Little Loch of the Three Marches.”  A small “sheet” of water located west of Strone, on the south side of Glen Loy.

 

LOCHAN T-SUIDHE:

(see: Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe)

 

LOCH APER:

(see: Lochaber)

 

LOCH ARKAIG / LOCH AR CIA-AIG:

Loch of the Small Trout.”  The only inland lake totally within the boundaries of Kilmallie Parish; situated among the mountains, it is between 12 and 17 miles in length (depending on the method of measurement), one to one and one half miles in breadth, and 359 feet deep.  This east-west loch, which the glaciers scoured, drains into Loch Lochy at its south end.  Near one extremity is a wooded island, which has been for ages the burying-place for the family of Lochiel and its chieftains. This loch was said to have been an ideal place to fish for salmon, but the construction of the Caledonian Canal brought this to an end.   Somewhere surrounding this loch is "said to be the resting place of a fortune in French gold," brought to Scotland on April 29, 1746.

(also see: Glaic a Mhadaidh)

 

LOCH BLAIR:

“Loch of the Flat” or “Loch of the Peat Moss.”  A “sheet” or medium-sized loch located north of Loch Arkaig at its midpoint.  Elevation: 993 feet.

 

LOCH BRIOBAIG:

“The Money Loch.”  A small “sheet” of water located just south of Loch Arkaig and approximately one mile due west of Invermallie.  Elevation 833 feet.

 

LOCH CHIARAIN / LOCH CIARAN:

Loch of St. Ciaran.”  Located due south of Loch na Staoinaig and southwest of Beinn Bhreac.

 

LOCH DA RATH:

(see: Loch Lundavra)

 

LOCH-DIAE NIGRA DEA:

(see: Loch Lochy)

 

LOCH EIL / LOCH IAL / LOCHEALE / LOCHHEIL:

“Loch of the Glint of Sunlight” or “Sun Glint Loch.”  A seven mile long loch in Clan Cameron country, from which the patriarchal title of Cameron Chiefs sprang from, in reference to their vicinity to the loch (and the lands of Loch Eil which border the north shore of the loch).  A principal inlet from the sea, at its “right-angle” junction with Loch Linnhe, it stretches in a northeastern direction to Fort William and the Caledonian Canal, then takes a northwestern direction for nearly ten miles towards Arisaig.  Loch Eil, though contiguous with Loch Linnhe, is “entered” through the Annat Narrows, a constriction.  It is also somewhat connected to Loch Lochy (via the head of Loch Linnhe) from the Caledonian Canal’s Neptune's Staircase or – as an alternate – the River Lochy.  The original “stronghold” of the Camerons of Lochiel (Eilean nan Craobh) was on an island here, located near Corpach.

 

LOCH EILDE BEAG / LOCH EILDE BIGE:

“Little Hind Loch.”  Along with its larger neighbor, Loch Eilde Mor, this loch is located between Loch Treig and Kinlochleven, in or near the Mamore Forest.

 

LOCH EILDE MOR / LOCH EILDE MOIRE:

“Big Hind Loch.”  Along with its smaller neighbor, Loch Eilde Beag, this loch is located between Loch Treig and Kinlochleven, in or near the Mamore Forest.

 

LOCHIEL:

Hereditary/Patriarchal title given, since 1528, to all Chiefs of Clan Cameron (...of Lochiel).  It is a Highland custom to address the chief of Clan Cameron as "Lochiel."

(see: www.lochiel.net)

(also see: MacDhomh'uill Duibh)

(also see: Tartan, Cameron of Lochiel)

 

LOCHIEL'S ISLAND:

Also referred to as Eilean Mhic Dhomhail Dhuibh.  A small island in Loch Shiel, where Lochiel and his "band of followers" once sought safety in the aftermath of the 1745 Uprising.

 

LOCH INBHIR:

“Confluence Loch.”  An old loch that is now part of the Blackwater Resevoir.  Located east of Kinlochleven.

 

LOCH LEVEN:

A sea loch connected by Ballachulish Bay to Loch Linnhe.  Seven small islands, including Eilean Munda, are located here.  The loch is nearly nine miles in length and varies between 650 and 5900 feet in width.  In addition to Ballachulish, Glencoe, Caolasnacon and Kinlochleven are located along the shores. 

 

LOCH LINNHE:

A northeast continuation of the Firth of Lorn, this Lochaber tidal loch and principal inlet from the ocean presumably means “pool” in Gaelic.  Outside the Corran Narrows, or toward the ocean, the loch was known as An Linne Sheileach – “The Brackish Channel” in generations past.  The area inside the Corran Narrows, extending up toward Fort William, was known as An Linne Dhubh – “The Dark Channel.”   Located in the southwest of Kilmallie Parish, the loch is 35 miles in length and from one to five miles in width, reaching along the shores of Ardgour to the entrance of Loch Eil, near where the Caledonian Canal begins.  Fort William is located at the loch's head, Lismore Island at its mouth or foot.

 

LOCH LOCHY / LOCH LOCHAIDH / LOCH-DIAE NIGRA DEA:

“Dark Goddess.”  A “sheet of fresh water” (loch) that forms part of the Caledonian Canal, about one and one-half miles to the east of Loch Arkaig.  North of Gairlochy.  It is approximately ten miles long and one and one-half miles wide.  It is chiefly located in the Parish of Kilmonivaig, but extends nine miles into Kilmallie Parish.  Connected to Loch Eil and Loch Linnhe via either the River Lochy or the Caledonian Canal.

 

LOCH LUNDAVRA / LOCHAN LUNN DA BHRA / LOCH DA RATH / LOCH LUNND DEABHRAIDH:

“Loch of Deabhra’s Marsh.”  A stretch of water approximately one mile long, located at 500 feet in a hollow among the high hills of Mamore.  In generations past this loch was said to be home to a Tarbhuisge (Water Bull), which lured cattle into the loch, never to be seen again.  A small island or crannog on the loch is said to have been home to King MacBeth.  

 

LOCH MEALL AN T-SUIDHE / LOCHAN MEALL AN T-SITHIDH:

(see: Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe)

 

LOCH NA BEINNE BAINE:

(see: Lochan na Beinn Baine)

 

LOCH NA CARAIDH / LOCHNACARRY / LOCH OF ACHNACARRY:

“The Loch of Achnacarry.”  A small indentation (not technically a loch at all, but more like a river bay) in the River Arkaig, located just east of the east end of the Beech Avenue, between Achnacarry Castle and Bun Arkaig.

 

LOCH NA CUAICH:

(see: Loch Quoich)

 

LOCH NA CURRA:

Loch of the Corner.”  Located southwest of Lochan Staic, near Loch Blair.

 

LOCH NA GAUL ROAD:

Early name of the road (rough, narrow country carriage road) stretching from the River Lochy through Banavie, Corpach and along the north shore of Loch Eil to Arisaig (roughly the modern day A 830).  This certainly followed the path of an early dirt track road and was constructed between 1804 and 1812 by Telford. 

 

LOCH NAM MARAG: 

A small lochan located near Torlundy, somewhat in the "elbow" of the River Lundy, as it turns to the southwest.

 

LOCH NAN SQUID / LOCH NA SGUD:

“Little Loch of the Scouts.”  Located in Glenkingie.

 

LOCH NA STAOINEIG:

Loch of the Little Juniper Tree.”  Located southwest of Loch Treig.

 

LOCH OF ACHNACARRY:

(see: Loch na Caraidh)

 

LOCH OF THE SWORD:

(see: Lochan A'chlaidheimh)

 

LOCH OSSIAN:

“Loch of the Bard.”  Located southeast of Loch Treig.

 

LOCH QUOICH / LOCH NA CUAICH:

“Loch of the Cup.”  The hills rise very abruptly from the shore of this loch and form an enormous “cuaich.”  The extreme northern boundary of “Cameron Country.”

 

LOCH SHIEL:

A narrow freshwater loch, between hills, stretching from the sea to Glenfinnan.  Located in the west of Kilmallie Parish.

 

LOCH STAOINEIG:

(see: Loch na Staoineig)

 

LOCH TREIG:

Loch of Dissolution or Death.”  Located east of the Grey Corries, in eastern Lochaber.

 

LOCH T-SUIDHE:

(see: Lochan Meall an t-Suidhe)

 

LOCHY (RIVER) / ABHAINN LOCHAIDH:

“River of the Dark Goddess.”  A large river running out of Loch Lochy.  Prior to 1803 it ran southwest from Cnoc an na Cairidh through the Falls of Mucomir, past Moy, Torcastle and eventually emptied into Loch Linnhe.  After that date it was re-routed, due to the construction of the Caledonian Canal.  The present route runs out of Loch Lochy via a new channel (the Mucomir Cut) which is located approximately 600 yards south of the Caledonian Canal.  These waters fall into the River Spean at Mucomir Bridge, and are briefly considered a part of that river.  However, these waters are once again named the River Lochy when falling into the old channel at Gairlochy.

 

LOCHY FORDS:

These fords no longer exist (due to the diversion of the river Lochy during the Caledonian Canal construction).  They were near Mucomir.

 

LOCHYSIDE:

A small settlement near Loch Eil and the River Lochy.

 

LON:

(see: Loan)

 

LONIE:

From the MacGillonie sept of Clan Cameron.

 

LOWBRIDGE:

Located in Glen Gloy, just north of Lower Glenfintaig, at the River Gloy.  The original bridge built in this location was completed sometime around 1736 by General Wade (as part of his Inverness to Fort William road).  After the 1745 Jacobite Uprising a small military post was stationed at this site.  In records, it was known as “Nine Mile Bridge,” since at that time Gloy was known as “Nine Mile Water.”

 

LOWER ACHINTORE (ACHINTORE BEAG):

Located approximately three miles south of Fort William.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745.

 

(see: Achintore)

 

LOWER ANNAT:

That portion of the original Annat settlement located west of the (Annat) Narrows, along the northern shoreline of Loch Eil.

 

LOWER FALLS OF NEVIS:

Located in the midst of Glen Nevis, just east of Acharaich (Achriach) and near Poll Dubh (that old placename is devrived from its proximity to the falls).  A narrow, rocky gorge with a picturesque waterfall and a seething “cauldron” below.

(also see: Poll Dubh)

 

LOY / LAOIGH:

(see: Glen Loy)

 

LOY BRIDGE / LAOIGH BRIDGE:

Located just north of Strone, at the entrance to Glen Loy.  At this place the River Loy, which flows through Glen Loy, is bridged both by the road and the Caledonian Canal.  It then empties into the River Lochy, approximately one-quarter mile distant.  Associated with the placename for the actual bridge in this vicinity, Drochaid na Laoigh.

 

LOY RIVER / LAOIGH RIVER:

A large mountain river rising in the west end of Glen Loy and flowing to the east for approximately five miles, where it becomes confluent with the River Lochy at Strone.

 

LUIBEILT / LUIB AILLT:

“High Precipitous Rock Corner.”  Located along the Abhainn Rath, west of Loch Treig.

 

LUNDALLIE:

(see: Lindallie)

 

LUNDAVRA / LUNN DA BHRA / LUNN DA BHRAIGHE / LINDAVRAH / LUNND DEABHRAIDH / LUNDOWRA:

“Marshy Land Between Two Hill Slopes” or “Deabhra’s Marsh.”  Located south of Fort William and north of Ballachulish.  Local legend states that Deabhra was a chief in this area, in ancient times.  There are ruins on an island in the loch that were supposedly a fort, by the name of Dun Deabhraidh (Dundavray or Dundawra) – Deabhra’s Fort.  Lundavra was once home to a cadet branch of Clan Cameron.

 

Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron tenants.

(see: Loch Lundavra)

 

LUNDAVRA, (THE CAMERONS OF):

The Cameron of Lundavra were cadets of the Camerons of Callart.  Due to the "failure" of the Callart family line, they succeeded to the chiefship of that estate in the 17th century.  An older Lundavra son inherited the Callart line and a younger son retained the Lundavra line.

 

LUNDY (RIVER) / ABHAINN LUNNDAIDH:

“River of the Marshy Place.”  Runs from north of Meall Breac toward the west, passing Torlundy and turning southwest before emptying into the River Lochy near Camnagheal. 

 

LUNN DA BHRAIGHE:

(see: Lundavra)

 

LUNNDAIDH:

(see: Lundy – River)

 

[Back to Top]

 

M-N

 

 

MacALDOWIE:

From the Dowie sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacALONIE:

From the MacGillonie sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacCHLERICH:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacCHLERY:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacCLAIR / MacCLEAR:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacCLEARY:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacCLERIE:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacDHOMH'UILL DUIBH:

The general hereditary patronymic by which the Chiefs of Clan Cameron have been know by since the time of their 11th Chief, Donald Cameron.

( also see: Lochiel)

 

MacFIE:

From the MacPhee sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacGILLERY:

From the MacGillonie sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacGILLONIE / MacGUILLONIES:

A major sept of Clan Cameron, located in Strone.  The surname is apparently derived from the Gaelic Mac Gill an fhaidh, "son of the servant of the prophet."  One of the three early Lochaber tribes that banded together and formed the Clan Cameron.  The early seat of their Chieftains was at Strone, at the foot of Glen Loy, where a burial place is still located. 

(also see: Mael-anfhaidh)

(also see: Strone)

 

MACILDOWIE:

From the Dowie sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacINTOSH'S ISLAND:

(see: Eilean mhic an toisich)

 

MacKAIL:

From the MacPhail sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacKELL:

From the MacPhail sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacKENZIE:

MacKenzies from North Ballachulish make up a sept of Clan Cameron.  They were known locally as “Na Tuathaich” – “The Northerners” since they were originally from north-country stock. 

 

MacLACHLAN:

MacLachlans from Coruanan make up a sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacLEAR:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacLERIE:

From the Clark sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacMARTIN / MacMARTINUS:

A sept of Clan Cameron, located in Letterfinlay, east of Loch Lochy.   One of the three early Lochaber tribes that banded together and formed the Clan Cameron.  Also connected with the lands of Stronaba , Mucomir, Invergloy, Glengloy, and a portion of Dochanassie.  The burial place for the MacMartins is at Cill 'Icomar, Achnanaimhnichean, and also at Cladh Mucomir, in Gairlochy.

(also see: Mael-anfhaidh)

 

MacMASTERS (M'VAISTERS):

MacMasters from Corrybeg make up a sept of Clan Cameron.  

 

MacMILLAN / MacMHAOLAIN:

MacMillans from Murlaggan and Caillich make up a sept of Clan Cameron.  A branch of this clan, along Loch Arkaig, was confederated with Clan Cameron.  Their burial grounds are located near the shore of the loch at Murlaggan.

 

MacONIE:

From the MacGillonie sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacOSTRICH:

A sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacPATRICK'S NARROWS / MacPETER’S NARROWS:

The old name for the narrows at Ballachulish Ferry.  The strait at Ballachulish is said to be named for the son of a Viking who drowned there.

(also see: Clach Pharuig / Clach Phadruig)

 

MacPHAIL:

A major sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacPHEE:

MacPhees from Glendessarry make up a sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacSORLEY / MacSORLIE / MAC SHOMHAIRLE (SLIOCHD SHOMHAIRLE RUAIDH):

A major sept of Clan Cameron, located in Glen Nevis (also known as the Camerons of Glen Nevis).  One of the three early Lochaber tribes that banded together and formed the Clan Cameron.

(also see: Mael-anfhaidh)

 

MacUALRIG:

From the Kennedy sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MACVAIL/VAILE/VAILL/VALE:

From the MacPhail sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MacWALRICK:

From the Kennedy sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MAEL-ANFHAIDH:

The three early Lochaber tribes that banded together and formed the Clan Cameron: the MacMartins of Letterfinlay, the MacGillonies (Mac ghille-anfhaidh), and the MacSorlies of Glenevis (Sliochd Shoirle Ruaidh).  Occupied lands east of the Lochy basin.

 

MAGH COMAIR:

(see: Mucomir)

 

MALLIE:

(see: Glen Mallie)

 

MALLIE (RIVER) / ABHAINN MHAILIDH:

“River of Saint Mhaillidh,” “River of the Black Monk” or “River of Saint Maolan.”  A mountain river rising on the northwest side of Monadh Beag and flowing east for approximately nine miles before falling into Loch Arkaig on its south shore, close to its foot.

 

MAM NA GUALAINN:

“Breast Shaped Hill of the Shoulder.”  Located southwest of Larigmore.

 

MAM NAN CALUM:

“The Pigeon’s Low Hill.”  Situated due west of Monadh Gorm (in the same range) west of the head of Loch Arkaig.

 

MAM NAN LONG:

“The Low Hill of the Ships.”  A “small eminence” situated southwest of Lagganfern and south of Glen Pean.

 

MAMORE (MAM MOR):

“The Great Moor” or “Large Breast Shaped Hill.”  Located north of Kinlochleven.  A large portion of this land was at one time controlled by the Camerons.    

 

MAOL AIRD / ARD:

“Bare Promontory” or “High Sloping Hill.”  A piece of “heathy pasture land” where at one time a market was held.  Located between Invermallie and Guisach.

 

MAOL RUADH:

(see: Meall Ruadh)

 

MARCH OF THE CAMERON MEN:

by Mary Maxwell Campbell, 1802

There's  many  a  man  of  the  Cameron  Clan,

That  has  followed  his  chief  to  the  field;

He  has  sworn  to  support  him,  or  die   by  his  side,

For  a  Cameron  never  can  yield.

I  hear  the  pibroach  sounding,  sounding,

Deep  o'er  the  mountain  and  glen;

While  light  springing  footsteps  are  trampling  the   heath,

'Tis  the  march  of  the  Cameron  Men.

Oh!  proudly  they  walk,  but  each  Cameron  knows

He  may  tread  on  the  heather  no  more;

But  boldly  he  follows  his  Chief  to  the   field,

Where  his  laurels  were  gathered  before.

I  hear  the  pibroach  sounding,  sounding,

Deep  o'er  the  mountain  and  glen;

While  light  springing  footsteps  are  trampling  the   heath,

'Tis  the  march  of  the  Cameron  Men.

The  moon  has  arisen,  it  shines  on  the  path

Now  tread  by  the  gallant  and  true;

High,  high  are  their  hopes,  for  their  chieftain  hath  said

That  whatever  men  dare  they  can  do.

I  hear  the  pibroach  sounding,  sounding,

Deep  o'er  the  mountain  and  glen;

While  light  springing  footsteps  are  trampling  the   heath,

'Tis  the  march  of  the  Cameron  Men.

 

MARTIN:

From the MacMartin sept of Clan Cameron.

 

MARYBURGH:

An adjoining settlement/town that grew up around the garrison of Fort William, named either after Queen Mary, daughter of James II, in 1692 or the consort of King William (reports vary).  The town was also named "Gordonsburgh" at one time, after the Huntleys, who were overlords of the district.  Later, in 1834, the town's name was changed once again to "Duncansburgh," in honor of Sir Duncan Cameron of Fassiefern, who bought the Duke of Gordon's lands.  There is some indication that the town was originally called Braintoun in 1654.

 

MEALL A' BHLAIR / BLAIR:

"Mountain of the Plain" or “Hill of the Flat.”  A prominent rocky hill, located about one mile east of Loch Blair and north of Loch Arkaig.

 

MEALL A’ BHUIRICH:

“Hill of the Pass.”  Located northwest of Luibeilt and west of Loch Treig.

 

MEALL A’ CHAORAINN:

“Hill of the Rowan Trees.”  Located in Nether Lochaber, west of Lundavra.

 

MEALL A’ CHOIRE BUIDHE:

A large hill feature located on the watershed north of Sgor an Fhuaran.

 

MEALL A’ CHOIRE GHLAIS:

“The Hill of the Grey Corry.”  A prominent hill located approximately one mile east of Fedden.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

MEALL A’ CHRUIDH:

(see: Cow Hill)

 

MEALL AN DOIRE DHUINN:

“The Hill of the Brown/Dark Oak Grove.”  An “eminence” located about one mile southeast of Sron Gharbh, north of Caillich and of Loch Arkaig.

 

MEALL AN DOIRE SHLEAGHAICH / SLEAGHAICH:

“Hill of the Oak Grove Spear?” South of South Garvan, in Ardgour.

 

MEALLAN DUBH:

“Small, Dark Hill” or “Little Black Hill.”  A small rocky hill located just north of the head of Loch Arkaig, northeast of Strathan.

 

MEALL AN FHEIDH:

“Deer Hill.”  Located north of Conaglen.

 

MEALL AN FHIR-EOIN:

“The Eagles’ Hill.”  A “considerable eminence” situated on the east side of Coire ‘Chaisil, south of Glen Pean.

 

MEALL AN TAIRBH:

“Hill of the Bulls.”  Located south of Glen Scaddle, in Ardgour. 

 

MEALL AN TAGRAIDH:

“Hill of Dispute,” “Hill of Dispution” or “Hill of Prosecution.”  Also known as Meall an T-sagairt (Hill of the Priest).  A very prominent conical hill, situated at the head of Glen Caig.  The march between Lochiel's lands and Glengarry's on this hill was long in dispute.  Bonnie Prince Charlie skulked here in 1746.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

MEALL AN TARMACHAIN:

“Hill of the Ptarmigan.”  A small knoll located on the historic parish boundary between Kilmallie and Ardnamurchan.  Approximately ½ mile east of Sgor nan Coireachan and at the top or head of Coire Bheithe.

 

MEALL AN T-SAGAIRT:

"Hill of the Priest."  Also known as Meall an Tagraidh (Hill of Dispute).  The march between Lochiel's lands and Glengarry's on this hill was long in dispute.  Bonnie Prince Charlie skulked here in 1746.

 

MEALL AN T-SEAMRAIG:

“Hill of the Clovers / Four Leaf Clovers / Shamrocks.”  A hill or short ridge  located approximately two miles southwest of Achnacarry and two miles due south of Achnasaul.  Just southwest of Tom nan Naoi-uairean.

 

MEALL AN T-SITHIDH:

(see: Meall an t-Suidhe)

 

MEALL AN T-SLAMAIN:

“Hill of the Flabby Substance.”  Located west of Trislaig, in Ardgour.

 

MEALL AN T-SUIDHE:

Either “Hill of Rest/of Fairies” or “Hill of the Seat/Sitting.”  Pronounced “Mealantee.”  One source supposes the name Meall an t-Sithidh (Hill of the Stormy Blast) but this is mere speculation.  A 2322 foot “outlier shoulder” of Ben Nevis (on its north-west side).  This round-shaped hill's western and southern slopes are contoured by the Tourist Trail from Achintee up to the summit of Ben Nevis.  The “lower one-half” of Ben Nevis.  Down its side run large pipes, the last section of the hydro electric power system required for the aluminium smelter, with water pumped from Laggan Dam. 

 

MEALL A' PHUBUILL:

“Hill of the Tents” or “Hill of the Pavillion.”  A very prominent hill located midway between Loch Arkaig and Loch Eil, and also midway between Glen Mallie and Glen Suileag, west of Druim Gleann Laoigh.  Elevation 2,533 feet

 

MEALL BLAIR:

“Peat Moss Hill.”  Located north of Loch Arkaig, near Loch Blair.

 

MEALL BHANABHIE:

Either “Hill of Banavie” or “Hill of Banquo” (in reference to the legendary Banquo and his supposed one time residence at nearby Torcastle).  A hill with a gently rounded summit located west of Torcastle and north of Banavie. 

 

MEALL BREAC:

“Speckled Mountain” or “Spotted Hill.”  A hill feature located between Glen Caig and Meall Odhar/Meall Coire Lochain, north of Ruighe na Beinne/Boinne.  Also a place located southwest of the Annat Narrows, in Ardgour; and another located northwest of Upper Glenfintaig.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

MEALL BREAC:

“Speckled Mountain.”  Located southwest of the Annat Narrows, in Ardgour.  Also a place located between Glen Caig and Meall Odhar/Meall Coire Lochain; and another located northwest of Upper Glenfintaig.  

 

MEALL BREAC:

“Speckled Mountain.”  Located northeast of Upper Glenfintaig, west of the River Roy.  Also a location between Glen Caig and Meall Odhar/Meall Coire Lochain; and another place southwest of the Annat Narrows, in Ardgour.

 

MEALL CIAN DEARG:

“Distant Red Hill.”  Located near Inverlair.

 

MEALL COIRE LOCHAIN:

“Hill of the Small Loch.”  A “bold rocky eminence” located on the southeast side of Meall Odhar.  West of Loch Lochy at its midpoint.  Elevation 2971 feet.

 

MEALL COIRE NAN SAOBHAIDH:

“The Hill of the Foxes Corry/Hollow” or “Coire of the Foxes Lairs.”  A prominent hill located approximately one mile northeast of Geal Charn and one mile north of Gleann Tarsuinn.  West of Loch Lochy.

 

MEALL CUMHANN:

“Narrow Shaped Hill.”  Located north of An Steall (Upper Falls of Nevis) in Glen Nevis.

 

MEALL DOIRE NA H-ACHLAIS / MEALL DOIRE NA H-ACHLAISE:

“Grove of the Armpit Hill.”  Located east of Binnein Beag.

 

MEALL DUBH:

“Dark Mountain,” located west of Loch Lochy at its midpoint.  Elevation 2500 feet.  Also a mountain just northwest of Bohuntine, in Glen Roy; a hill south of Brackletter; and a mountain located east of the River Roy, in the Braes of Lochaber.

 

MEALL DUBH:

Dark Mountain,” located just northwest of Bohuntine, in Glen Roy.  Also a mountain located west of Loch Lochy, at its midpoint; a hill south of Brackletter; and a mountain located east of the River Roy, in the Braes of Lochaber .

 

MEALL DUBH:

Dark Mountain,” a hill located south of Brackletter.  Also a mountain located west of Loch Lochy, at its midpoint; a mountain just northwest of Bohuntine, in Glen Roy; and a mountain located east of the River Roy, in the Braes of Lochaber.

 

MEALL DUBH:

“Dark Mountain,” located north of Allt Glas Dhoire and east of the River Roy, in the Braes of Lochaber.  Also a mountain just northwest of Bohuntine, in Glen Roy; a hill south of Brackletter; and a mountain located west of Loch Lochy, at its midpoint.

 

MEALL LOCHAN NAN DUBH LOCHAN:

“The Hill of the Small Loch of the Black Lochs.”  A small hill situated on the east side of Lochan na Beinne Baine, north of Loch Arkaig.

 

MEALL MOR:

 

”Large Hill.”  Located north of Conaglen.

 

MEALL NA H-EILDE:

“The Hind’s Hill.”  A conical hill located approximately ½ mile west of Meall an Tagraidh.  North of the Dark Mile.

 

MEALL NA LEANGA:

(see: Meall na Teanga)

 

MEALL NAM MAIGHEACH:

“Hill of the Hares.”  Located in Glen Garvan, southwest of Garvan.

 

MEALL NAN CLEIREACH:

“Hill of the Clarks” or “Hill of the Clerics.”  Located north of Lundavra.

 

MEALL NAN DAMH:

“Hill of the Stags.”  Located southwest of Glen Garvan.

 

MEALL NAN LUATH:

“Hill of Ashes.”  Located north of Inverroy.

 

MEALL NAN SPARDAN:

“Hill of the Little Eminence.”  An eminence locatged on the west side of Coire an Eich, approximately one mile south of An Cumhan.

 

MEALL NA SROINE:

“Hill of the Promontory.”  Located northwest of Glen Dessery.

 

MEALL NA TEANGA:

“Hill of the Tongue.”  Located between Coire Odhar Mor and Coire Leacach.  North of the Clunes Forest and west of Loch Lochy.

 

MEALL NAN CLEIREACH / MEALL NAN CHLEIREAC / MEALL NAN CLEIRACH:

“Hill of the Clerks.”  Near Lundavra and the West Highland Way.

 

MEALL ODHAR:

“Dun Hill” or “Dun Colored Hill.”  Just west of (adjacent to) Meall Coire Lochain.  North of Clunes.

 

MEALL ONFHAIDH:

“Storm Hill” or “Hill of the Strorm.”  Located between Gleann Suileag and Gleann Fionnlighe.

 

MEALL RUADH / MAOL RUADH:

"Red Hill," just southwest of Stronecreggan.  Also a hill directly north of Roybridge, in Glen Roy.

 

MEALL RUADH / MAOL RUADH:

"Red Hill," directly north of Roybridge, in Glen Roy.  In the shadow of this hill the Battle of Mulrou was fought, in August 1688.  Also a hill just southwest of Stonecreggan.

 

MEALL TIONAIL:

“Hill of the Sheep Gathering.”  Located in the Killiechonate Forest, north of Sgurr Choinnich Mor.

 

MHUIC:

(see: Muick)

 

MHURLAGAIN:

(see: Murlaggan)

 

MILE DORCHA:

(see: Dark Mile)

 

MILE DUBH:

(see: Dark Mile)

 

MILNE:

A croft.

(see: Culchenna)

 

MOEY:

(see: Moy)

 

MOIGH:

(see: Moy)

 

MOINE ODHAR:

“Dun-Colored Peat Moss.”  Located southeast of Tomacharich, along the south banks of the Allt Achadh na Dalach. 

 

MOINTEACH DHUBH:

Possibly meaning "Dark Moor."  Located in the Leanachan Forest, south of Spean Bridge.

 

MONADH BEAG:

“Small/Little Hill.”  A “small heathy eminence” located west of Gairlochy, between the western ends of Coire Chraoibhe and Coire Choille-rais.  Also a hill further west, south of Glen Mallie.

 

MONADH BEAG:

“Small/Little Hill.”  A hill feature located between Glen Mallie and Gleann Cham Dhoire, approximately ¼ mile west of the confluence of Allt Cham Dhoire with the River Mallie.  Also a hill located further east, between the western ends of Coire Chraoibhe and Coire Choille-rais.

 

MONADH CEANN LOCHAIRCAIG:

“Hill at the Head of Loch Arkaig.”  A large hill (partly covered with birch trees on its northeast side in 1875) located north of Glen Camgarry, just south of Loch Arkaig, near its head.

 

MONADH GORM:

“Green Hill” or “Tolerably Verdant Level Hill Ground.”  Located approximately ½ mile west of Strathan, separating Glen Dessery and Glen Pean at their eastern ends. 

 

MONADH UISGE MHUILLINN / MONADH UISGE ‘MHUILINN:

“Hill of the Water Mill” or “Tolerably Level Hill Ground of Mill Water.”  A “healthy eminence of considerable extent” stretching between Coire Chraoibhe and Coire Mhuilinn.  Located southwest of Monadh Beag and just west of Coire Chraoibhe, due north of Erracht.

 

MONADH LEATHANN:

“Broad Hill.”  Located in Ardgour, southwest of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

MONESSIE / I MBUN EASA:

“Near the Waterfall.”  Located in Glen Spean, south of the River Spean and southwest of Achluachrach.  There were, at one time, magnificent waterfalls (i mBun Easa) at this site, but due to the nearby hydroelectric dams these are now nearly non-existent.

 

MO RIGH'S MO DHUCHAICH:

An ancient motto of Clan Cameron, meaning "For King and Country."

 

MORVERN:

Lands owned by the Duke of Argyll, outside of the traditional "Cameron Country" that were settled in the early seventeenth century by Camerons of Glendessary and Dungallon.  Cleared of Camerons by the Argyll estate after 1746.  Presently a sparsely populated village.

 

MOTTOS:

"Aonaibh Ri Chéile" - Unite/Let Us Unite

"Mo Righ's Mo Dhuchaich" - For King and Country

(see: Crest)

 

MOUNT ALEXANDER:

Located on the split of land that runs between the eastern bank of the Caledonian Canal and the western bank of the River Lochy, across from Dalvenvie and northeast of Banavie.  A farm steading that probably pre-dated the Caledonian Canal.  Built on what was probably only a small tor or hill that may have been reduced in size when the canal was constructed.  The east bank of the canal was built up against Mount Alexander, and the site was somewhat isolated from roadway traffic due to the canal.  One source indicates that this location was previously called Murlaggan. 

 

MOUNT CAMERON:

Near the center of what is now East Kilbride, Lanarkshire, Scotland.  This land was originally owned by Jenny Cameron of Glendessary, the widowed daughter of Allan Cameron of Glendessary.

 

MOY / MOIGH / MAGH:

Meaning "Plain" or "On the Plain," in reference to the low ground west of the River Lochy (now bisected by the Caledonian Canal) stretching north and south from Allt Coire Chraoibh and Drochaid na Magha.  A former village(s) [Easter Moy and Wester Moy] on the Caledonian Canal, at the northeastern edge of Glen Loy, south of Gairlochy.  Once home to Gormshuil, "The Witch of Moy." Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Camerons, McConichy-Camerons, MacCarloch-Camerons, MacCalom-Camerons, McInnes-Camerons, Vans, Roys, Kennedys as tenants.  There is an old burial ground located at this place, on a small hill near the canal.  Also a place at the head of Glen Spean.

 

MOY / MOIGH / MAGH:

Meaning “Plain” or “On the Plain.”  Located near the head of Glen Spean.  Also a place along the River Lochy and Caledonian Canal, south of Gairlochy.

 

MOY BRIDGE:

A double-leaf swing bridge located over the Caledonian Canal (within the section of the canal known as “Gornshuil Bend”) just southwest of Moy.  The bridge is operated much like a canal lock, with a keeper stationed nearby at an adjacent cottage. 

 

MOYNESS (THE RAIDS ON):

Taking place in both 1598 and 1645.

 

MUCKEREL:

(see: Muick)

 

MUCOMIR / MAGH COMAIR / DALMACOMER / DALMACOMMER / DAIL MAGH-COMAIR:

“The Plain of the Meeting of the Waters,” “Place of the Confluence,” “Meeting Place of the Confluence Field” or “Plain/Field of the Confluence.”  A wide area of low, flat ground. Located between the River Spean and the Caledonian Canal.  Commonly thought to be the place where the River Spean and Loch Lochy "mingle" their waters, at the south end of Loch Lochy.   In actuality, the "confluence" was, in the past, the union of a now non-existent part of the River Lochy and the River Spean, at Gairlochy.  An artificial channel was cut here when the Caledonian Canal was constructed for the waters of Loch Lochy to flow through.

 

When the area was surveyed in 1875, Mucomir consisted of a “farm steading and dwelling house, one storey slated and in good repair; property of the trustees of the Belford Deed of Mortification.”  A branch of the MacMartins of Letterfinlay resided at Mucomir in the early eighteenth century, and a number of Camerons were living there in 1805 (also in neighboring Torness).

Located just north of the Commando Memorial, west of Spean Bridge on the road to Achnacarry.  The clans under the command of Viscount Dundee gathered here prior to the Battle of Killiecrankie and he raised his standard here (then known as "Dalmacomer," another rendering of the name).

(also see: Falls of Mucomir)

 

MUICK / MUIC / MUCKEREL:

“Of the Pig” or “Swine Place.”  On the north shore of Loch Arkaig, northwest of Achnasoul.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.  When surveyed in 1772 the gravelly soil was fertilized by tathing (confining livestock to manure the land) and laying fern fronds.  It was then used to sow two crops of oats prior to lying in grass for six to seven years.

 

MUIR-BHALGAN:

(see: Murlaggan)

 

 

MUIRLAGAN:

(see: Murlaggan)

 

MUIRSHIRLICH / MUIRSHEARLICH / MUIRSHEIRLICH / MISCHEROLACH / MOYSHERALICHE / MOUSHEIRLICH:

Possibly meaning “Moor of the Willow Trees” or “Field of Forage Crop.”  A crofting district by the River Lochy, between Banavie and Strone.  This land was at one time rented to a Cameron (MacSorlies) from the Camerons of Glen Nevis, sometime around the middle of the seventeenth century.  Later, a member of the Camerons (MacGillonies of Strone) rented this land, after 1670.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron tenants. 

 

MULLACH COIRE AN IUBHAR:

(see: Ben Alder)

 

MULLACH COIRE NAN GEUR-OIREAN / GERRARAN:

“Summit Coire of the Gerraran,” “Head of the Horses’ Hollow” or “Corrie of the Sharp Edges Summit.”  A feature of considerable extent and elevation located southeast of Gerraran, north of the River Mallie.

 

MULLACH NA BRIOBAIG:

“Summit of the Little Bride,” “Summit of Briobaig” or “Summit of the Small Sum of Money.”  A hill of considerable extent and elevation located off the southern edge of Guisach (The Pine Forest).

 

MULLUCH NAN COIREAN:

Summit of the Corries” or “Summit of the Little Circular Hollows.”  Loctaed in Nether Lochaber, east of Lundavra.  A long flat-topped mountain (its summit is on a plateau) with threee large corries (Coire Dearg, Coire Carach and Coire a’ Mhuilinn) overlooking Glen Nevis.

 

MULROY (THE BATTLE OF):

1688

 

MURBHLAGAN:

(see: Murlaggan)

 

MURLAGGAN / MURLAGAN / MUIRLAGAN / MURLIGAN / MURBHLAGAN / MUIR-BHALGAN / MUR' LAGAN / MHURLAGAIN:

“Hollow Moor,” “Walled-in-Hollow,” “Sea Bag” or “A Little Bay.”  Located at the west end of Loch Arkaig, on the north shore.  Residence of the Camerons of Inverailort, where on May 8, 1746 the Highland Chiefs met and entered into a bond of mutual defense, agreeing never to lay down their arms unless instructed to by their Prince.  Nearby is the burial place of the MacMillans.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacMillans as tenants.  When surveyed in 1772, the farm of Murlaggan spanned to the head of Loch Arkaig.  In addition to crofts and farm houses, the Murlaggan fam consisted of the old Hanoverian army wooden barracks at Strathan, school house, school master’s house (made of stone and lime) and a public house at Tillycrochlan (also built with stone, and considered – in the late eighteenth century – a necessary halting spot to and from Barrisdale to the West Highlands).  Also a place in the Braes of Lochaber, west of Roy Bridge and the former name of Mount Alexander.

 

MURLAGGAN / MURLAGAN / MUIRLAGAN / MURLIGAN / MURBHLAGAN / MUIR-BHALGAN / MUR' LAGAN / MHURLAGAIN:

“Hollow Moor,” “Walled-in-Hollow,” “Sea Bag” or “A Little Bay.”  Formerly the name for Mount Alexander.  Also a place at the west end of Loch Arkaig and in the Braes of Lochaber, west of Roy Bridge.

(see: Mount Alexander)

 

MURLAGGAN / MURLAGAN / MUIRLAGAN / MURLIGAN / MURBHLAGAN / MUIR-BHALGAN / MUR' LAGAN / MHURLAGAIN:

“Hollow Moor,” “Walled-in-Hollow,” “Sea Bag” or “A Little Bay.”  Located in the Braes of Lochaber, west of Roybridge.  Also a place at the west end of Loch Arkaig and the former name of Mounta Alexander.

 

MURLIGAN:

(see: Murlaggan)

 

NA CLUAINEAN:

“The Pasture” or “The Meadows.”  An extensive piece of arable land located just to the west of Clunes, along the Dark Mile.  The placename of Clunes was also known by this name, periodically at times in the past.

 

NA H-UAMHACHAN:

(see: Wauchan)

 

NA H-UILT FEARNA:

“The Alder Burns.”  A number of small streams rising on the hill west of Gairlochy that flow east and fall into both Loch Lochy and the formerly into the River Lochy, but now fall into the Caledonian Canal.

 

NARROWS (THE):

(see: Camusnagaul)

 

NEPTUNE'S STAIRCASE:

An impressive series of eight locks that span the 64 feet difference within 500 yards between the Caledonian Canal and the sea, constructed in the 1820s.  Located in the village of Banavie.

 

NETHER LOCHABER:

The southern part of Lochaber, located along with the Braes of Lochaber - one of Lochaber's two sub-divisions to the east (east of the Lochy basin).  Includes Mamore, Callart, and Lundavra.  Stretches from Fort William southward to Loch Leven.

 

NEVIS:

(see: Ben Nevis, Glen Nevis, Nevis - River)

 

NEVIS BRIDGE:

A small community located near where the present-day A-82 crosses the River Nevis, at the north-western edge of Fort William.

 

NEVIS (RIVER) / ABHAINN NIBHEIS:

Possibly meaning “River of the Biting Cold Water.”  Begins its flow in eastern Glen Nevis (as the “Water of Nevis”).  Changes from a broad hill and moorland burn to a compressed torrent through the 400 foot high Nevis Gorge and then broadens out in the flats of the glen as the River Nevis.  Empties into Loch Linnhe just northeast of An Aird, Fort William.

    

 

NINE MILE BRIDGE:

(see: Lowbridge)

 

NINE MILE WATER:

(see: Glen Gloy)

 

NORTH BALLACHULISH:

(see: Ballachulish)

 

NORTH GARVAN RIVER:

An Ardgour river that merges with the South Garvan River (which flows generally to the north into Glen Garvan), forming the River Garvan, which in turn empties into Loch Eil near southwestern head.  

(also see: Garvan – River)

 

NORTH INCH OF PERTH (BATTLE AT THE):

1396

 

[Back to Top]

 

O-P

 

 

OAK:

The English or common oak, Quercus Robur, is one of the ancient badges of Clan Cameron (along with Crowberry).  A "majestic" tree that can reach a height of 50 meters (165 feet), with a stout trunk and large, irregular crown   It has very little fall color and does not drop its leaves until late in the season.  The leaves are alternate, simple two inches to five inches long, with rounded lobes; obovate, auriculate leaf base with short petiole.  In Gaelic it is referred to as the Dair or Darach and also Darag, Dur, Dru and Daru.  Highlanders sometimes called it "Righ na Coille," "The King of the Wood."

(also see: Crowberry)

 

OCHINICH:

(see: Onich)

 

OENICH:

(see: Onich)

 

OFFANYCH:

(see: Onich)

 

OMHANACH / OMHANAICH:

(see: Onich)

 

ONICH / AONACH / OTHANICH / OCHINICH / OMHANACH / OMHANAICH / OFFANYCH / OENICH:

“Moor,” “Place Full of Rich Frothy Milk” or “Foamy/Foam Frothed Place” (in reference to the sea in the area, the shore faces the south-west winds) (translations vary).  A village located west of North Ballachulish, on the rock, shingle and sandy shores of Loch Linnhe, at the northern portion of outer Loch Leven.  One of the places in the past where the dead from Perthshire and other eastern areas were embarked for burial at Iona.  Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron and MacKenzie tenants.

 

OTHANICH:

(see: Onich)

 

PALM SUNDAY (THE BATTLE OF):

1429

 

PARALLEL ROADS:

(see: Glen Roy)

 

PATRICK'S STONE:

(see: Clach Pharuig)

 

PAUL / PAULUS:

From the MacPhail sept of Clan Cameron.

 

PEAN:

(see: Glen Pean)

 

PEAN (RIVER) / ABHAINN PHEIGHINN:

“Pennyland River” or “The Three Peny Lands River.”  The river (which was known for its salmon fishing in generations past) rises in the foothills of Sgurr nan Coireachan and then flows north then northeasterly through Glen Pean, before joining the River Dessary near Strathan.  

 

PHUITEACHAIN:

(see: Puiteachan)

 

PIOBAIREACHD DHOMNUILL DUIBH/DUBH:

"Pibroach of Donald Dubh," a "march" piobaireachdan of Clan Cameron.  One of the most stirring pipe tunes ever composed, often inspiring both the men of Clan Cameron and later Highland regiments.

 

PIOBAIREACHDAN (BAGPIPE MUSIC):

see:

................

Ceann na Drochaide mhor/moire

Cruinneachadh nan Camronach

Cumha Ailein Oig

Failte Shir Eoghan

Piobaireachd Dhomnuill Duibh

 

PIPE MUSIC:

(see: Piobaireachdan)

 

PLAID:

(see: Tartan)

 

POLL A' CHAIT:

 

(see: Cat Pool, The)

 

POLLDUBH:

“Dark Pool.”  An old placename derived from the nearby Lower Falls of the River Nevis.  A popular rock climber's destination, Polldubh is home to Cameron Stone.

(also see: Carn Dearg)

(also see: Lower Falls of Nevis)

 

POLL GARBH:

“Dark Pool.”  Located on the River Spean, northwest of Coneachan.

 

PORT BAN:

“The White Harbour” or “The Fair Harbour.”  Located on the south side of Loch Arkaig, near its foot.  Roughly opposite from Eilean Loch Arkaig.

 

PORT NAM MARBH:

 

“Port of the Dead.”  Located along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, just north of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

PORT NAM MEIRLEACH:

 

“Port of the Robber/Thief.”  There are two such named ports, both on Loch Linnhe, directly across from one another.  The first is along the western shore of the loch, just north of Inverscaddle Bay and the second is along the eastern shore, west of Coruanan.

 

 

PRESTONPANS (THE BATTLE OF):

September 21, 1745

 

PRINCE'S CAVE, (THE):

A cave located on Torr a' Chronain, above the Dark Mile, sheltered Prince Charles Edward Stuart during mid-August, 1746.

 

PUITEACHAN / PHUITEACHAIN / PUTACHAN:

“The Swelling Knoll” or “Young Moorfowl Place.”  A small settlement located in Glen Loy, just south of Achnanellan.  In 1875 this location was noted as having “a shepherd’s dwelling house.”

 

 

[Back to Top]

 

 

Q-R

 

 

QUERCUS ROBUR:

(see: Oak)

 

RAINEACH:

(see: Rannoch)

 

RALLYING CRY:

"Chlanna nan con thigibh a so's gheibh sibh feoil" - "Sons of the hounds come here and get flesh."

(also see: Lochan a' Chlaidheimh)

 

RANGER(S):

(see: Castle Commando)

 

RANNOCH / RANNOCH MOOR/RAINEACH:

Moor lands originally owned by Alexander Robertson of Strowan, outside of the traditional "Cameron Country," that were settled prior to the eighteenth century by Camerons of Glenevis and Mamore.  These Highlanders settled along both sides of Loch Rannoch.  Reported by the estate factor in the mid-eighteenth century to have originally been "refugees."

 

The moor is some twelve square miles in size, and is located between Loch Ossian and the Blackmount Forest.  It consists of a granite "floor," covered by a "carpet" of peat, and is located anywhere from 1200 to 2000 feet above sea level.

 

Present day Rannoch Moor is a vast expanse of peatland, widely considered one of the most important in Europe.  The blanket bog and small lochans support several rare species of plants, insects and birds.

(also see: Camghou Ran)

 

RATHLIOSBEAG / RATHLIOSBEG / RATH-LIOS BEAG:

“Little Enclosure of the Mound of Fort.”  Located north of the Commando Memorial and north of Stronenaba, east of Loch Lochy’s foot.  A branch of MacMartin-Camerons resided at this place in generations past.

 

RATH-THULACH BEAG:

(see: Ratullochbeg)

 

RATTULICHMORE:

(see: Rattulichmore)

 

RATULLOCHBEG / RATH-THULACH BEAG:

“Little Hill Mound or Fort.”  Located somewhere in the vicinity of Glenfintaig.  A branch of MacMartin-Camerons resided at this place in generations past.

 

RATULLOCHMORE / RATULLICHMORE:

“Big Hill Mound or Fort.”  Located somewhere in the vicinity of Glenfintaig.  A branch of MacMartin-Camerons resided at this place in generations past.

 

RED BURN:

(see: Allt Dearg)

(see: Allt na h-Urchaire)

 

REE (RIVER) / ABHAINN RIGHE:

“River at the Base of a Mountain.”  Located northeast of Culchenna.

 

REIDH NAN FIADH:

“The Deers Flat.”  A small flat of level place on the face of a hill approximately ½ mile west of Sgor nam Coireachan.

 

RELENMORE:

Upon the Estates of Lochiel, circa 1788.

 

RIVER:

(see: specific name of river; ie. River Lochy = Lochy River)

 

ROARING MILL:

A low but voluminous waterfall located on the River Nevis, just after entering the glen at Nevis Bridge.  Also known, in the past, as Eas a' Chlaiginn (Waterfall of the Claggan).

(also see: Allt Garbh)

 

ROSS (THE RAID ON):

1491

 

ROUGHBURN / GARBH-ALLT:

Located in Glen Spean.

 

ROY:

(see: Glen Roy)

 

ROY BRIDGE / DROCHAID RUAIDH:

In Gaelic “Drochaid Ruaidh,” “Bridge of the Red River.”  Located one mile west of Inverroy, at the junction of the River Spean and the River Roy, west of Spean Bridge.  At the head/foot of Glen Roy, where the hill waters of the River Roy come rushing down a deep channel through the glen to join the River Spean.

(see: Kilachoireil)

 

ROY (RIVER) / ABHAINN RUAIDH:

Red River.”  Runs through Glen Roy.  Runs generally to the southwest before emptying into the River Spean at Bunroy, just south of Keppoch.  

 

RUBHA ALLT A’ BHRADAIN:

“The Point of the Salmon Burn.”  A point of land planted in hardwood (in 1875) jutting out into Loch Lochy, along the located B8005 (on its east side) just south of the entrance of Achnacarry.

 

RUBHA DEARG:

(see: Rudha Dearg)

 

RUBHA DUBH UISGE:

“Duisky Point” or “Black Water Point.”  Located near Duisky, on the south shore of Loch Eil, near its junction with An Dubh Uige.

 

RUBHA GUIBHAIS:

“Fir Point.”  A large point or promontory projecting out into Loch Arkaig, on its north shore, between Murlaggan and Caillich.

 

RUBHA MHIC AN TOISICH:

“MacIntosh’s Rock.”  Located near the west end of Loch Eil, on its south shore, just north of Garvan.  This was the location of the Battle of Bun Garbhain (Bun Garvan), circa 1570.  At this spot, Donald “The Taillear Dubh” Cameron felled the Chief of Clan MacIntosh, in combat.  Later that day the entire Mackintosh party was decimated by the men of Clan Cameron.

 

RUBHA NA CLOICHE:

“Promontory of Stone.”  Located on the north shore of Loch Eil, just west of Fassifern and Camas a Mhuilleir.

 

RUBHA NA MAOIL AIRD/ARD:

“Tall Bare Top Promontory” or “Point of the High Sloping Hill.”  A promontory located on the south shore of Loch Arkaig, just west of Invermallie and the mouth of the River Mallie.

 

RUBHA NA MUICE MARA:

 

“Sea Pig Point?”  Located on the south shore of Loch Eil, just west of Blaich.

 

RUBHA NAN LAOGH:

“Promontory of the Calf” or “Calf’s Point.”  A small point of pasture ground (in 1875) located on the south shore of Loch Arkaig, near Invermallie and the mouth of the River Mallie.

 

RUBHA RAINICH:

“Fern Promontory.”  Located along the south shore of Loch Eil, just west of Blaich.

 

RUDHA CHEANNA MHUIR:

“Point of the Head of the Loch/Sea.”  A point on the north shore of Loch Arkaig, near Kenmore.

 

RUDHA DEARG:

“Red Point.”  The north-eastern point of Ardgour, near the junction of Loch Linnhe and Loch Eil.  Also a point located along Loch Linnhe’s western shoreline, just south of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

RUDHA GUIBHAIS:

(see: Rubha Guibhais)

 

RUDHA NA MAOIL ARD:

(see: Rubha na Maoil Ard)

 

RUDHA NAN LAOGH:

(see: Rubha nan Laogh)

 

RUIGHE AN ACHAIDH BHRIC:

“The Herding Place of the Checkered Fields.”  A sheltered spot, located on the north side of Coir a’ Bhalachain, north of Loch Arkaig.

 

RUIGHE MOR:

“Great Shieling,” “Big Herding Place,” “Large Plain” or “Big Hill Slope.”  A shelter or summer pasture located near the west end of Glen Mallie, just north of the River Mallie, west of its junction with Allt a’ Cham Dhoire.

 

RUIGHE NA BEINN / RUIGHE NA BOINNE:

“Sheiling of the Mountain,” “Herding Place of the Mountain” or “Hill Slope of the Mountain.”  Located north of the Dark Mile and east of the River Caig, between the head of Allt nan Mean and Coire Bhan.. 

 

RUIGHE NAM FIADH:

“The Deer’s Slope.”  A portion of land situated on the north side of Allt Ruighe nan Fiadh, just north of the head of Glen Mallie.

 

[Back to Top]

 

S-T

 

 

SAILLEACHAN:

(see: Sallachan)

 

SALLACHAN / SAILLEACHAN:

“Dirty/Foul Water,” “Willow Copse,” “Salting Tub” or “Beef Stand.”  Located just east of Muick, along the northern shore of Loch Arkaig.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with MacPhees and MacNuyills (MacNeils?) as tenants.  When surveyed in 1772 Sallachan was noted as bring very poor pasture land, moggy and dangerous.  There was limited farming here, on gravelly soil, mostly oat and corn.  Also a place southwest of Ballachulish.

 

SALLACHAN:

“Dirty/Foul Water,” “Willow Copse,” “Salting Tub” or “Beef Stand.”  Located southwest of Ballachulish, originally on the Stewart of Appin estate.  The adjacent Salachan Burn flows northwestwards through Salachan Glen into Loch Linnhe (south of Cuil Bay).  Also a place along the northern shore of Loch Arkaig.

 

SAMUEL'S CAVE / UAMH SHOMHAIRLE:

Located in scenic Glen Nevis, not far from the present-day top car park.  A popular hiding spot throughout the years.  It was here that the young heir to the Camerons of Glen Nevis was temporarily hidden after his entire tribe was wiped out by a Clan Chattan ambush (see: Cnoc na mi Chomhairle).  This was also the location where the wife of Cameron of Glen Nevis and her children hid from Hanoverian troops during the aftermath of the 1745 Jacobite Rising.  They were eventually discovered by the troops and Mrs. Cameron's youngest infant was wounded in a brief struggle between his mother and the Hanoverians.

 

The cave was also known in fables as the home of the mighty fianna, the ancient heros and giants of Gaelic mythology.  Legend has it that these giants are sleeping in this cave to this very day, and can only be awakened by the sound of three blows from a horn.

 

SAMUEL'S STONE:

Also known as "Clach Shomairle" or the Wishing/Rolling Stone.  This stone is located in Glen Nevis, roadside between Nevis Bridge and the Glen Nevis Visitor Centre.  It has been relocated in modern times from its original location, which was said to have marked the site of victory for the Camerons of Glen Nevis over an unknown enemy.  Legend states that it would revolve around on its axis three times on one certain day each year, and those present at such a time could have the answers to three questions asked of it.

 

This is one of two stones known in Gaelic as "Clach Shomairle/ Clach Mic Shomhairle."

(also see: Stone of the Heads)

 

SCADDLE (RIVER) / ABHAINN SGARBHDAIL:

“River of the Cormorant-Dale Glen.”  Flows west to east through the midst of Ardgour before joining with the River Cona west of Invescaddle Bay, where these intermingled waters empty into Loch Linnhe.

 

SCOUR GAIRICH:

“A large, and in some parts “precipitous,” mountain located on the souoth side of Loch Quoich, opposite Glenquoich House (in 1875).

 

SEALLADH-CUIL:

“Nook View.’’  Located in Glenree.

 

SEAN MHEALL:

“Old Hill.”  Located northwest of Glaster and north of Cam Bhealach.

 

SEPTS:

Blood relations or others who sought protection and leadership from an association with Clan Cameron.

 

SGOR A MHAIM / SGURR A’ MHAIM / SGORR  A’ MHAIM:

“Peak of the Round Steep Hill.”  Located due south of Ben Nevis, in the lower part of Glen Nevis.  Features a distinctive shining silver-gray peak of quartz and schist.  Often confused by casual observers as being a snowy peak.  Sgor a Mhaim rised with Stob Ban.

 

SGOR AN FHUARAIN:

“Conical Hil of the Spring.”  A “considerable eminence” located approximately one mile east of Sgor Mhor.

 

SGOR BEAG:

“Small Conical Hill.  A “considerable eminence” located approximately ¾ mile southwest of Sgor Mhor.

 

SGOR CHOINICH:

“The Conical Hill of the Moss.”  A promonent rocky hill, on the historic border of the parishes of Kilmallie and Kilmonivaig, approximately ¼ mile northwest of the head of Coire Mhuic.  North of Loch Arkaig.

 

SGOR COS NA BREACHD-LAOIDH:

“Peak of the Grey Stone Caves.”  A large rough peak, chiefly covered with rocks, located approximately 1 ¼ miles southeast of Sgor nan Coireachan.

 

SGOR MHOR:

“The Lage Conical Hill.”  A “considerable eminence” located approximately one mile west of Sgor an Fhuarain.

 

SGOR MHURLAGAIN:

(see: Sgurr Mhurlaggan)

 

SGOR NA CICHE:

“Hill of the Breast/Pap.”  A large, rocky and very prominent feature with a pointed hill, located approximately one mile southeast of Ben Adin.

 

SGOR NAN COIREACHAN / SGORR NAN COIREACHAN:

“Pointed Hill of the Hollows” or “Peak of the Corries.”  A high hill located approximately 1 ½ miles north of Glen Finnan and approximately 3 ½ miles southeast from the east end of Loch Morar. 

 

SGORR A’ BHUIG:

(see: Sgurr a’ Bhuic)

 

SGORR A’ CHOINNICH BHIG:

(see: Sgurr Choinnich Beag)

 

SGORR A’ CHOINNICH MHOIR:

(see: Sgurr Choinnich Mor)

 

SGORR A’ MHAIM:

(see: Sgor a Mhaim)

 

SGORR AN FHUARAIN:

“Peak of the Spring Well.”  Located northwest of Glenkingie.

 

SGORR AN IUBHAIR:

(see: Sgurr an Iubhair)

 

SGORR CHALUM / SGORR CHALUIM:

“Malcolm’s Peak.”  Located northwest of Acharaich, in Glen Nevis.

 

SGORR FINNISG-AIG:

(see: Sgurr Finnisg-aig)

 

SGORR NA H-EANCHAINNE:

(see: Sgurr na h-Eanchainne)

 

SGORR THUILM:

(see: Sgurr Thuilm)

 

SGURR A' BHUIC / SGURR A’ BHUIG / SGORR A’ BHUIC / SGORR A’ BHUIG:

“Peak of the Roe Buck.”  A 3,166 foot peak located somewhat southeast of Aonach Beag.

 

SGURR AN IUBHAIR / SGORR AN IUBHAIR:

“Sharp Hill of the Yew Wood” or “Peak of the Yew Tree.”  Located north of the Cona River, in Cona Glen, generally south of Duisky.

 

SGURR AN IUBHAIR / SGORR AN IUBHAIR:

“Sharp Hill of the Yew Wood” or “Peak of the Yew Tree.”  Located in the Mamores, just northwest of Am Bodach.

 

SGURR CHOINNICH BEAG / SGORR A’ CHOINNICH BHIG:

“Peak of the Small Moss.”  Located southeast of Aonach Beag, adjacent to Sgurr Choinnich Mor.

 

SGURR CHOINNICH MOR / SGORR A’ CHOINNICH MHOIR:

“Peak of the Large Moss.”  Located southeast of Aonach Beag, adjacent to Sgurr Choinnich Beag.

 

SGURR FINNISG-AIG:

Peak of White Water Place.”  Located northwest of the summit of Aonach Mor, near the top of the Nevis Range ski lift and mountain restaurant.

 

SGURR MHURLAGAIN / SGOR(R) MHURLAGAIN:

“Peak/Sharp Hill of the Hollow Moor,” “Peak/Sharp Hill of the Walled-in-Hollow,” “Peak/Sharp Hill of the Little Bay” or simply “Peak of Murlaggan.”  A “rocky eminence” situated approximately two miles north of Murlaggan.  

 

SGURR NA H-EANCHAINNE / SGORR NA H-EANCHAINNE:

“Peak of the Ingenuity.”  Located in Ardgour, northwest of Keil.

 

SGURR THUILM / SGORR THUILM:

“Sharp Hill of the Island,” referring to an island in one of the rivers leading away from the mountain or “Peak of a Round Hillock.”  Located south of Glen Pean and west of Allt a' Chaorainn.  

 

SHANAVAL:

Located in Glen Dessery, west of Loch Arkaig.  When surveyed in 1772 there was a considerable amount of limestone (hard, but the lime is very white and free from sand) located on this farmland.  At one time considered a part of the Glen Dessery lands, on the Lochiel Estate.

 

SHEANGAIN:

A small settlement located at the eastern end of Glen Laragain, near the B8004 and the Caledonian Canal.  Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobite army passed through here in August 1745.  At this place a road leads south down to and under the Caledonian Canal (following roughly the same path as the Allt Sheangain) to Tor Castle.

 

SHERIFFMUIR, (THE BATTLE OF):

November 13, 1715

 

SHIRTS, (THE BATTLE OF THE):

(see: Blar-nan-Leine, The Battle of)

 

SLEOCH / SLEAGHACH:

“Rift” or “Gully Place.”  Located northeast of Larigmore.

 

SLIDING BURN, THE:

(see: Allt Coire Eoghainn)

 

SLIOCHD EOGHAINN MHIC EOGHAINN / SLIOCHD EOGHAINN 'IC EOGHAINN:

(see: Erracht, The Camerons of)

 

SLOCHD NA MARA:

“Hollow by the River.”  Located near the River Spean, across the river from Coneachan and near the Brackletter Sand Pit.

 

SLOGGAN, THE / SLUGGAN, THE / AN SLUGAN:

“The Gullet.”  A pool located in the River Lochy.

 

SLUAGH-GHAIRM:

(see: Rallying Cry)

 

SOLDIER'S SEAT:

Located at the foot of Dun Dearduil, in Glen Nevis.  A distinctive flat-topped boulder, though no one seems to recall exactly which soldier it is named for.

 

SORLEY / SORLIE:

From the MacSorley sept of Clan Cameron.

 

SOURLIES:

A shepherd’s dwelling (in 1875) located on the north side of the River Finiskaig and nearly opposite the sheep farmers dwelling of Finiskaig.

 

SOUTH GARVAN:

On the south shore of Loch Eil, west of Duisky.

(see: Glen Garvan/Glen Garvin)

 

SOUTH GARVAN RIVER:

An Ardgour river that merges with the North Garvan River (which flows generally to the north through Glen Garvan), forming the River Garvan, which in turn empties into Loch Eil near southwestern head.  

(also see: Garvan – River)

 

SPEAN (RIVER) / ABHAINN SPIATHAIN / ABHAINN AONACHAIN:

“Hawthorn Glen River” or “River of the Smell.”  Runs through the heart of Glen Spean, east to west, before emptying into the River Lochy southwest of Gairlochy (near old Kilmonivaig).

  

 

SPEAN BRIDGE/DROCHAID AN AONACHAIN / DROCHAID SPIATHAIN:

In Gaelic “Drochaid an Aonachain,” “Bridge of the Smell” or “Bridge of the Hawthorn Glen River.”  A village and old market place along the River Spean and the Braes of Lochaber that saw the first skirmish of the 1745 Rising, at High Bridge.  Postal center serving Achnacarry, and the nearest commercial area to the Lochiel Estate.

(also see: Commando Memorial)

 

SPEYSIDE, (THE CAMERONS OF):

Home to a sizable population of Camerons, said to be descended from 12 young Camerons who escorted a lady of the House of Lochiel to marry a Stewart of Kincardine in the mid-1500's.  It has been suggested that one of these men might have been Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron ,and the men were his followers.  Similar to the history of the Camerons of Hilton and Kincardine.

Another possible influx of Camerons are said to have been brought on during the early seventeenth century, descended from a cadet of the Camerons of Glenevis, who left Lochaber in charge of his infant Chief and eventually settled at Balvenie, just south of Dufftown.

 

SPOUT, THE / AN SPUT:

A burn (now partially subterranean) that flows underneath Fort William and empties into Loch Linnhe.  In generations past the women of Fort Wiliam and Maryburgh washed their cloths here. 

(see: Upper Falls of Nevis)

 

SRAID BHANCO:

(see: Banquo's Walk)

 

SRON A’ BHUIRIDH:

“Bellowing Point” or “Roaring Point.”  A prominent point of a hill, on the north side of Beinn Bhan. 

 

SRON A’ CHOIRE GARBH / SRON A’ CHOIRE GHAIRBH:

Point/Promontory of the Corrie of Rough Water."  Located at the head of Coire Glas, north of Loch Arkaig.  Also a place west of Loch Lochy.

 

SRON A' CHOIRE GARBH / SRON A’ CHOIRE GHAIRBH:

"Point/Promontory of the Corrie of Rough Water."  West of Loch Lochy, elevation 3066 feet.  Also a place located at the head of Coire Glas, north of Loch Arkaig.

 

SRON A’ CHREAGAIN:

(see: Stronchreggan)

 

SRON AN FHEARNA:

“Projection of Alders.”  A rocky projection located southwest of Eilean a’ Ghiubhais and near Coire Glas, south of Loch Arkaig.

 

SRON BHREAC:

“Speckled/Spotted Point/Nose.”  A “bold, rocky shoulder or point” of moor-land at the southeast base of Meall Coire Lochain.  West of Loch Lochy. 

 

SRON GHARBH:

“The Rough Point.”  A “precipitous eminence” located north of Lundavra, about 1 ½ miles northeast of Sgurrr Mhurlaggan.

 

SRON GHORM-ACHADH AN T-SEILICH:

“The Point of the Blue Field of the Willows.”  A rocky point located about ½ mile west of Lochan Dubh.

 

SRON LIATH:

“Grey Point.”  Located between Glen Loy and Glen Laragain, due west of Strone.  Also a place located southeast of Lochan a’ Chomhlain. 

 

SRON LIATH:

“Grey Point.”  Located southeast of Lochan a’ Chomhlain, near the head of Gleann Camgharaidh.  Also a place located between Glen Loy and Glen Laragain. 

 

SRON NA BA / SRON NA BO:

(see: Stronenaba)

 

SRON NA FEARNAIG:

“Point of the Alder Trees” or “Alder Point.”  A “conspicuous prominence” located between Guisach and Gerraran, south of Loch Arkaig.

 

SRON NA H-UINNSINN:

(see: Stronahunsion)

 

SRON NAM BO:

“Point of the Cow.”  Located southeast of Lower Glenfintaig.  This point or promontory is the namesake of Stronenaba, located to the southwest.

(also see: Stronenaba)

 

SRON NAN LEAC:

“Flagstone/Flatstone Point” or “Projection of Flags.”  A south slope of the hill Mullach na Briobaig, southwest of Loch Briobaig, off the southern edge of Guisach.

 

SRON NIBHEIS:

(see: Strone Nevis)

 

SRON SGOR A MHAIM / SRON SGURR A’ MHAIM / SRON SGORR  A’ MHAIM:

“Point of the Peak of the Round Steep Hill.”  Located northwest of Sgor a’ Mhaim (which is due south of Ben Nevis, in the lower part of Glen Nevis).

 

 

STAOINEAG:

Juniper Place.”  A bothy located southwest of Loch Treig, along the Abhainn Rath.

 

STEALL:

(see: Upper Falls of Nevis)

 

STOB A’ CHUIR:

“Stake of the Snow.”  Located south of Cona Glen, in Ardgour.

 

STOB A’ CHUL-CHOIRE:

Located due east of and adjacent to Aonach Mor’s summit.

 

STOB A’ COIRE LEITH:

Located in the Grey Corries, due east of Aonach Mor.

 

STOB A' GHRIANAN / STOB A’ GHRIANAIN:

“Mountain of the Sunny Hillock” or “Stake of the Sunny Spot.”  Just south of Glen Loy adjacent to Druim Fada.

 

STOB BAN:

“Fair Stake.”  Located west of Loch Treig and due north of Luibeilt.  Also a place due south of Acharaich.

 

STOB BAN:

“Fair Stake.”  Located due south of Acharaich.  Also a place west of Loch Treig and north of Luibeilt.

 

STOB CHOIRE CLAURIGH:

(see: Stob Coire Claurigh) 

 

STOB COIRE A' CHEARCAILL:

“Corrie of the Circle” or “Corrie of the Hoop or Circle Stake.”  Located south of Loch Eil, west of Loch Linnhe; north of the Cona River/Cona Glen.

 

STOB COIRE A’ CHLADHAIRE:

(see: Stob Coire Claurigh)

 

STOB COIRE AN EASAIN:

(see: Stob Coire Easain)

 

STOB COIRE AN LAOIGH:

“Corrie of the Calf Stake.”  Located east of Aonach Mor, in the Grey Corries, just southeast of the western-most Stob Coire Easain.

 

STOB COIRE BHEALAICH:

A neighboring peak to Aonach Beag, to its southeast.

 

STOB COIRE CATH NA SINE:

Located in the Grey Corries, due east of Aonach Mor.

 

STOB COIRE CLAURIGH / STOB CHOIRE CLAURIGH / STOB COIRE CHLADHAIRE / STOB COIRE A’ CHLADHAIRE:

“Corrie of the Poltroon (Coward) Stake.”  Located in the Ben Nevis “neighborhood,” roughly between the two Stob Coire Easains.

 

STOB COIRE EASAIN:

“Corrie of the Waterfalls” or “Corrie of the Cascade Stake.” Located west of Stob Choire Claurigh, and east of Aonach Mor and Aonach Beag.  Also another place located nearby - east of Stob Choire Claurigh.

 

STOB COIRE EASAIN:

“Corrie of the Waterfalls” or “Corrie of the Cascade Stake.”  Located east of Stob Choire Claurigh.  Also another place located nearby – west of Stob Choire Claurigh.

 

STOB COIRE GAIBHRE:

Located at the northern edge of the Grey Corries, southeast of the Leanachan Forest.

 

STOB COIRE NA CEANNAIN:

“Corrie of the Little Headland Stake.”  Located in the Grey Corries, due north of Stob Ban.

 

STOB MHICBHEATHAIN:

“MacBean’s Stake.”  Located northwest of Glen Scaddle.

 

STONE OF SOMERLED:

A stone/boulder resting near the side of the road in Glennevis.  Thought to have been named after the ancestor of the MacSorlies/Camerons of Glennevis.

 

STONE OF THE HEADS:

A stone located on the left hand side of the graveyard gate in Camghou Ran, Rannoch.  Local history states two differing accounts of this stone.  First, it is said that this stone was utilized by the Chief of Clan Macintosh, in the midst of a “lover’s quarrel” to “brain” the children of one Ewen Cameron (presumably to death).  A good many men were said to have perished in the resulting clan battle.  The other version states that the MacSorlie-Camerons who lived in the Rannoch area had continual run-ins with their MacGregor neighbors.  The MacGregors, insulted by an incident that occurred at Ardlarich, invited a Macintosh or (more likely) a party of Macintoshes from Badenoch to get vengeance.  The Camerons were slaughtered without mercy, with the Macintosh bashing the heads of Ewen Cameron’s children against this stone, before their own mother’s gaze. 

 

This tale is not documented in Clan Cameron's written history (other than in a questionable work) but may have occurred nonetheless.

 

This is one of two stones known in Gaelic as "Clach Shomairle."

(also see: Samuel's Stone)

 

STRATHAN:

“Little Wide Valley,” “Little Strath” or “Little Dale.”  A small settlement at the head of Loch Arkaig (reduced to only a shepherd’s house by 1875) at the foot junction of Glen Dessery and Glen Pean.  The River Dessary empties into the head of Loch Arkaig just east of the settlement.  A track leads from Strathan up Glen Dessery, eventually emerging at the eastern end of Loch Nevis.  Hanoverian barracks (Tigh Nan Saighdearan) were located here following the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion.  This remote spot once sported a school and was the focal point for the people of Glendessery and Glenpean.

 

STRATHDEARN:

(see: Braes of Strathdearn)

(also see: Moyness)

 

STRATH EACHAIG / STRATHEACHAIG (THE TAYLORS / MacINTAYLORS OF):

Thought to be the descendants of Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron and his followers.  The River Eachaig flows from Loch Eck, a large inland glacial loch down to the sea at the head of the Holy Loch. It meanders through the Strath and has great variety and character as it covers over five kilometers before reaching the sea.

 

STRATH-LACHLAN (THE MacLACHLANS OF):

Relatives of Donald Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe Cameron, thought to have been descended from Camerons.

 

STRATHSPEY:

A branch of MacSorlie-Camerons settled here.

 

STREAP / STREAP A’ CHOMHLAIN:

“Climb (of the Company).”  A “precipitous eminence of considerable height,” the watershed of which partly forms the historic boundary between the counties of Inverness and Argyll.  Located at the south end of Allt a' Chaorainn.

 

STREAP COMHLAIDH:

“Barrier Climb.”  Located east of Streap (Streap a’ Chomhlain).

 

STROME / STRONE, (CASTLE OF):

Allan MacDonald Dubh Cameron, XII Chief of Clan Cameron, was appointed Keeper of this castle in 1472.  Strome/Strone was a MacDonald stronghold on Lochcarron in Ross-shire.  Allan was married to Mariot, daughter of Angus MacDonald, 1st of Keppoch, who in turn was brother to Donald, Lord of the Isles.  This was not a "Clan Cameron" castle, though there is little doubt that many affairs of the Camerons were coordinated from this location.  Coincidentally, this very same year the term "Clan Cameron" was first utilized in recorded history.  This castle is not associated with the Camerons of Strone.

 

STRONABA:

(see: Stronenaba)

 

STRONAHUNSION / SRON NA H-UINNSINN:

“Promontory of the Ash Tree.”  Formerly an inhabited place, located in Glenree.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron tenants.

 

STRONCHREGGAN / STRONECREGGAN / SRON A’ CHREAGAIN:

On the western shore of Loch Linnhe, directly west of Ach' an Todhair.  A broad grassy plain here stretches back from the loch into the wide glen leading into Choire a Chearcaill.

 

STRONE / AN T-SRON:

“Promontory” or “Projection,” specifically one nose-shaped.  Located by the River Lochy, at the foot of Glen Loy.  Consisted of “a farm steading and dwelling house, one storey slated and in good repair” in 1875.     The small burial ground of the Camerons of Strone/MacGillonies is nearby (Carn Phail), just below the house (near the bank of the Caledonian Canal).  This burial ground was reduced in size (a portion was removed) when the canal was built.  Not associated with the Castle of Strome/Strone.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron tenants.

 

STRONE, (THE CAMERONS OF):

(see: MacGillonie)

 

STRONELEA / STRONLEA / STRONLIA:

“Grey Point.”  Located somewhere close to the junction of Fionn Lighe and Allt a’ Choire Reidh.  There was a township (“old Highland town/toun”) located in this area (Stronlea) in 1745, with Cameron and MacLean tenants/wadsetters, but it was deserted within the next generation or so.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745. 

 

STRONENABA/ SRON NA BA / SRON NAM BO:

“The Nose or Promontory of the Cows.”  A settlement located northeast of Gairlochy and northwest of Spean Bridge.  The namesake promontory referred to is Sron nam Bo (Sron na Ba), “Point of the Cows,” located to the northeast of Stronenaba.  The MacMartin-Camerons of Letterfinlay held these lands in centuries past.

 

STRONE-NEVIS / SRON NIBHEIS:

“Promontory of Nevis.”  Located southwest of the River Nevis, in Glen Nevis (somewhat near the Roaring Mill) this point or promontory forms the northeast portion of Fort William’s Cow Hill.  Above the River Nevis’ Roaring Mill (to the west). 

Battle of Strone Nevis, circa 1654

 

STRONLEA / STRONLIA:

(see: Stronelea)

 

SUAICHEANTAS:

(see: Crowberry or Oak)

 

SUILEAG (RIVER) / SUILEIG / ABHAINN SUILEIG / AN T-SUILEAG:

“River of the Sallow Plant Glen,” “River of the Deep Pool Glen,” ‘River of the Notched/Serrated Eye Glen,” “River of the Little Oriface Glen” or “River of the Little Eye Glen” (translations widely vary).  A river that  rises on the north side of Coille Mhor and flows in a southwestern direction for about four miles into Loch Eil, on its north shore at Fassiefern/Fassfern.

 

SUMMERHOUSE:

A ruined stone-built edifice at the side of the River Arkaig at Achnacarry.  Not part of the original residence, rather a garden summerhouse built by Donald "The Gentle" Lochiel, when his garden was laid out prior to 1745.

 

SUNART:

Lands owned by the Duke of Argyll, outside of the traditional "Cameron Country," that were settled in the early seventeenth century by Camerons of Glendessary and Dungallon.  Cleared of Camerons by the Argyll estate after 1746.

 

SWORD LOCHAN:

(see: Lochan A'chlaidheimh)

 

TACKSMEN:

Lessees of land from Lochiel, they traditionally raised the clan's fighting forces in times of war.

 

TAILLEAR:

From the Taylor sept of Clan Cameron.

 

TAILLEAR DUBH NA TUAIGHE (BLACK TAILOR OF THE AXE):

Natural son of Ewen Beag Cameron, 14th Chief of Clan Cameron.  He was fostered and nursed by a tailor's wife in Blar-nan-Cleireach, or Lundavra, from which the infant was referred to as "An Taillear Dubh."  He grew up a brave and prudent man, famous for his sarcasm and ready wit, but even more so for the skill with which he wielded his battle-axe, the Tuaighe, a favorite weapon of the Camerons of Lochaber; from this came his sobriquet of “Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe.”  Not being of legitimate birth, he could not act in the capacity of chief, instead he became the champion of the Camerons.  It is said that in every battle in which he led them they were victorious.  It is believed that in time he and a moderate number of allied Camerons settled in Cowal, where they all adopted the name of Taylor, in reference to Donald.  His younger cousin, Allan, 16th Chief of Clan Cameron, whose estate and very life had been saved by Donald, bestowed upon him a great honor, placing his effigy in the family coat of arms as supporters, with his battle-axe conspicuously held aloft.  There he remains.  The name Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe rouses great pride and affection; he is thought of as the ideal warrior and hero of Clan Cameron.

(also see: Stratheachaig)

(also see: Strath-Lachlan)

 

TARTANS:

 

* BASIC CLAN CAMERON:  The tartan listed as "Clan Cameron," deep red and dark green, with bright yellow borders, is for general use by all members of Clan Cameron.  It is also available as "ancient" Cameron, with softer dye colors and as a "reproduction" tartan with supposedly more "authentic" colors.  If one tartan had to be singled out as the tartan for Camerons worldwide, Basic Clan Cameron would be the one.  As is with most clan tartans, this is one from the Vestiarium of Scoticum in 1834, which was accepted by the then Lochiel over 150 years ago.  It very much resembles an old red and green square sett in the West Highland Museum in Fort William, although there are some variations.  One should remember that while "clan tartans" are indeed rather old, that in many instances they only have a passing resemblance to the garb of the ancient Scots.

* CAMERON OF LOCHIEL:  This is a red and blue tartan similar to that worn by the XIX Chief, Donald "The Gentle Lochiel" Cameron, in a portrait hanging at Achnacarry.   It was first illustrated in 1810 in Wilson's Collection.  This is the personal tartan of the Chief and his immediate family; as a rule it should not be worn by clansfolk.

* CAMERON OF ERRACHT:  Said to have been designed by the wife of Donald, 7th of Erracht, in 1793 (in actuality there are many theories as to its origin, none seem entirely satisfactory).  It is a combination of the Cameron tartan and that of MacDonald of Keppoch (her tartan); a dark tartan using deep red, dark blue, green and a fine gold line.  This tartan was created for use by the original 79th Regiment, later known as the Queens Own Cameron Highlanders, raised in 1793 by their eldest son, General Sir Allan Cameron, K.C.B.  Regardless of its "origin," this specific tartan has been in use by The Cameron Highlanders since their late eighteenth century inception.  It is often used as a day or "hunting" tartan because of its "serviceable" colors.  At times it has been strictly reserved for use among the regiment, but is now in wide use among Clan Cameron.

* CAMERON HUNTING:  With its soft shades of green and blue, Hunting Cameron of Lochiel tartan is not listed as being restricted in its use.  It was devised because the "basic" Clan Cameron tartan was considered too bright for shootings, stalking and hiking.  Designed in 1956, it was based on a description of the tartan worn by the clansmen who fought under Sir Ewen Cameron, 17th Chief, at the battle of Killiecrankie.

* CAMERON TARTAN VARIATIONS:  The aforementioned tartans are all available in variations known as "muted," "ancient" and "modern."  Any of these variations are acceptable for use, and are recognized as valid Cameron tartans.  There are also tartans which are identified as Clan Cameron, such as the grey and brown pattern sold as "Hunting Cameron" or those with color variations of the Cameron of Erracht.  There are no rules against wearing them, but it should be noted that they might not be visually recognized as Cameron tartan.

 

TAYLOR / TAYLER:

A major sept of Clan Cameron. This surname is derived from the Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe (Black Tailor of the Axe), the natural son of Ewen Beag Cameron, 14th Chief of Clan Cameron, known as the greatest warrior of Clan Cameron, wielding his famed Lochaber axe.

 

TEANGA BHEITHE:

 

“Birch Tongue.”  Located south of Loch Eil, just south of the Annat Narrows and west of Achaphubuil.

 

TEANGA CHOIRE ODHAR:

“Tongue of the Dun Corry.”  A piace of land at the point where Allt Cam Bealach and the River Caig meet.  North of Clunes. 

 

TEANGA MHEADHONACH:

“Middle Tongue.”  Located in Ardgour, south of South Garvan and north of Lochan Leac an Iubhair.

 

THIEVES' FORD, (THE):

A ford on the River Lochy, just above the Cat Pool.

 

"THREE MEN ON THE HILL":

(see: Commando Memorial)

 

TIGH NAN SAIGHDEARNAN:

“The Soldier’s Barracks.”  Located near Strathan, at the head of Loch Arkaig.  These ruins were old barracks built by Hanoverian government troops in the time of the Jacobite Rebellion.

 

TIRINDRISH / TIRANDRISH / TIR-NA-DRISE:

“Land of the Common Bramble Bush.”  Located northeast of Spean Bridge, in Glen Spean.

 

TODHAR BAN:

(see: Torebane)

 

TOLLIE / TOLLAIGH:

“At Hole Place.”  Located in the Nevis Forest, east of Blarmachfoldach.

 

TOM A’ BHARRAICH:

“Knoll of the Tree Buds.”  A small knoll located approximately ¼ mile south of Inverskilavulin, south of the River Loy.

 

TOM A’ CHAORAINN / TOM A’ CHAORUINN:

“Knoll of the Rowan Trees.”  Located north of Loch Arkaig, northwest of Murlaggan.  Just southeast of Fraoch Beinn.

 

TOMACHARICH / TOMACHARRICH / TOM A' CHARRAICH:

“Hillock of the Uneven Surface” or “Carrach’s Hillock.”  A small hamlet in a rural area north of Torlundy.  In the early 15th century the Lord of Lochaber had his seat here.

 

TOM A’ MHONAIDH:

(see: Tomonie)

 

TOM AN ACHAIDH BHUIDHE:

“Yellow Field Hillock.”  A small knoll located just west of Strone, near the foot of Glen Loy.

 

TOM AN EIREANNAICH:

“The Irishman’s Knoll.”  A “round swelling knoll” planted in hardwood (in 1975) located east of Clunes.

 

TOM AN EITE:

A small hillock located in the midst of Glen Nevis, past the Upper Falls.  It is the summit and watershed point of the glen.

 

TOM AN FHITHICH:

“Mound/Hill of the Ravens” or “The Ravens Hillock.”  A prominent rocky feature located approximately one mile north of Torr a’ Ghallain, just north of the Dark Mile and east of the River Caig. 

 

TOM AN TEINE:

“Hillock of the Beacon.”  A small hill located in northeastern Leanachan Forest, east of Mointeach Dhubh and south of Spean Bridge.

 

TOM AN T-SLUIC:

“Hillock of the Hollow.”  Located north of Tomacharich.

 

TOM EAS AN T-SLINNEAN / TOM EAS AN T-SLINNEIN:

“Knoll of the Shoulder Waterfall,” “Waterfall of the Shoulder” or “Cascade of the Shoulder Hillock.”  Located across the main road in Glen Nevis from the Visitor Centre, just east of the West Highland Way trail (between the WHW and the main road in Glen Nevis).  A later Camerons of Glennevis burial place - stones go back to 1792 or earlier.

(also see: Achnacon)

 

TOM FIACLACH:

“Crooked Mound” or “Jagged Mound.”  Located just south of Stronenaba.

 

TOM LIATH:

“The Grey Knoll.”  A small knoll planted in fir (in 1875) located immediately north of Bun Arkaig.  Not on modern maps, this place seems to be situated directly north of Drochaid Arkaig on past maps, strattling the River Arkaig.

 

TOM NA BRATACH / TOM NA BRATAICHE:

“Mound or Hillock of the Banner.”  A knoll located north of Lianachan, near Achandaul.  Location where a party of Campbells fleeing from the battle of Inverlochy in 1645 made a final, futile stand.

(also see: Achan a' Chath)

 

TOM NA CEANNA MHURACH:

“Mound of the Bent/Covered Headland?”  A small hill located at the head of Loch Arkaig, north of Kinlocharkaig.

 

TOM-NA-FAIDHIR / TOM NA FAIDHREACH:

“Knoll of the Market / Fair” or “Hillock of the Market / Fair.”  A hillock near the present-day Achintee Farm, north of the River Nevis.  Located in a cutting like a quarry.  This was the old market stance and location for cattle fairs for Lochaber until the 19th century.  The exact location is unclear, although one source indicates that it is now developed with homes and forms part of Claggan.

 

TOM-NA-FAIRE / TOM NA H'AIRE:

“Lookout Hill,” probably so named for its functionality in regard to nearby Inverlochy Castle.  Its location is either southwest of the castle or the highest portion of the ridge east of the castle.  In 1730 Donald “The Gentle Lochiel” Cameron, XIX Chief of Clan Cameron, ordered the public execution of a thieving Cameron here (who had stolen and killed a young bull belonging to a local laird), where a “large concourse of Lochaber natives” watched him hanged to death.  It was the last such execution in Lochaber history.  The site was used as an anti-aircraft installation during WWII.

 

TOMNAHARRY / TOM NA H-EIRBHE:

“Hillock of the March Dyke.”  Said to be part of the ridge nearest to Inverlochy Castle (see Tom na Faire).  At one time this may have been the historic boundary between the Inverlochy and Claggan estates.

 

TOM-NA H-IOLAIRE:

“The Eagle’s Knoll.”  Located at the west end of Loch Arkaig, about ¼ mile southwest of Strathan.  Also a place on the southern edge of the Leanachan Forest.

 

TOM-NA H-IOLAIRE:

“The Eagle’s Knoll.”  Located at the southern edge of the Leanachan Forest, west of The Cour.  Also a place southwest of Strathan, near Loch Arkaig’s head.

 

TOM NAM BIORAICHEAN:

“Hillock of the Two Year Old Heifers.”  Located near Torlundy.

 

TOM NA MOINE:

 

“The Knoll of the Peat Moss.”  Located along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, just northeast of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

TOM NAM PEATHRAICHEAN:

“Hillock of the Sisters.”  Located north of Achandaul.

 

TOM NAN DROBHAIREAN:

“Drover’s Hill” or “Knoll of the Herdsman’s Drove.”  A small knoll, planted in fir trees (in 1875) located just east of Bun Arkaig, jutting out into Loch Lochy.

 

TOM NAN NAOI-UAIREAN / TOM NAN NAOI UARAN:

“Nine O’clock Hillock” or “Hillock of the Nine Fresh Water Springs.”  A circular hill located approximately one mile southwest of Achnacarry, directly south of Eilean Loch Arkaig.  Just northeast of Meall an t-Seamraig.  The origin of this place name is unclear.  The geographic feature may have been a “natural time-teller” for the early residents of Lochaber.  The position of the sun with respect to some large rocks (usually on hill tops) was an indication of certain times of the day.  It may also be listed incorrectly on modern maps, and may actually be a placename referring to local fresh water springs.  Aerial photographs do indicate a large hill with a number of burns running down from it, in accordance with Ordnance Survey maps.  However, the location shown on Ordnance Survey maps place it slightly too far to the west.

 

TOM NA SROINE:

A hill located in southeastern Leanachan Forest, between Allt Choille-Rais and Allt Coire an Eoin.

   

TOMONIE / TOM MOINE / TOM A’ MHONAIDH / TOMVONIE:

“Peat Moss Hillock” or “Hillock of the Moor.”  A small settlement one-half mile west of Banavie

 

TOMVONIE:

(see: Tomonie)

 

TOREBANE / TODHAR BAN:

“Fair Bleaching Field.”  Located west of Kinlochiel, along the northern shore of Loch Eil at its head.

 

TORCASTLE / TORR A' CHAISTEIL:

“Bluff Rock of the Castle” or “Castle of the Bluff Rock.”  The seat of the family of Lochiel, built circa 1530 by Ewen Cameron, 13th chief of Clan Cameron, on the west bank of the River Lochy, at a site where there had already been previous dwellings/castles for hundreds of years (MacDonald of Keppoch had a stronghold there in the 14th century).  As the name implies, the site was a strong one, on a mound or "tor."  On one side were the precipitous cliffs overlooking the River Lochy, on the other side a marshy depression.

 

Torcastle was abandoned by Sir Ewen Cameron, 17th chief of Clan Cameron "with the view of building a more convenient house" (which would be Achnacarry), somewhere around 1655/1665.  His youngest son, Ludovick (of 1745 Jacobite fame) would reside at Torcastle until just after the end of the '45, though records are unclear on this subject.  Torcastle was within the disputed land between Clan Cameron and Clan MacKintosh, north of Fort William.

 

TORCASTLE, (THE CAMERONS OF):

A cadet branch of Clan Cameron.

 

TOREBANE:

A small settlement near the head of Loch Eil (west of Kinlochiel along the A 830) northwest of Drumasallie.

 

TORLUNDY / TORR LUNNDAIDH:

“Hill of the Marshy Place.”  A quiet, rural area just north-east of Inverlochy, south-east of Torcastle; on the edge of the Leanachan Forest.  Location of the present-day Inverlochy Castle Hotel - not be confused with the historic site of Inverlochy Castle.  Also home to a scattering of private homes.

 

TOR NA COR:

A hill located in Glen Nevis, near Glen Nevis house, where cattle used to graze.

 

TORNESS / TORRNESS / TORR AN EAS / TORR AN EASA:

“Hill of the Waterfall.”  Located just southeast of Mucomir, along the north shore of the River Spean (just prior to its confluence with the River Lochy).  This land was originally settled by MacMartins, before the early eighteenth century.  By 1805 the area consisted entirely of Camerons.  This old settlement’s namesake hill is located just to the east, north of Coneachan, along General Wade’s old military road.

 

TORR A' CHAISTEIL:

(see: Torcastle)

 

TORR A’ CHROMAIN:

“Kites’ Hill.”  A small cultivated (in 1975) green knoll located approximately ½ mile south of Clunes.

 

TORR A' CHRONAIN / TORRE CLUAINE:

"The Mound/Knoll of the Murmuring Noise" (as in stream).  A prominent rocky small hill to the east of the River Caig, “overhanging” the nearby Dark Mile.  Prince Charlie's Cave is on the side of this hill.

 

TORR A' CHOIT:

“The Hillock of the Croft” at Glenfinnan, believed by the majority of historians to be the place where "Bonnie Prince Charlie" raised the standard, signaling the beginning of the Jacobite Uprising of 1745.

 

TORR A’ GHALLAIN:

“Knoll of the Sabling” or “Knoll of Fire.”  The low tree-clad ridge which divides the Dark Mile into two parallel valleys - the River Arkaig flows through the southern one, the actual Dark Mile road traverses the northern one.

 

TORR A’ GHOIRIDH:

“Hillock of the Gorrie.”  This may be an early site associated with or occupied by the Siol Gorrie – an early Lochaber tribe often at odds with Clan Donald.  Located northeast of Tomacharich, near Wade’s old military road.

 

TORR A' MHUILT:

“The Mound of the Weathers/Wedders.”  A thickly wooded small hill directly north across the River Arkaig from Achnacarry.  A hut was constructed here, in which Prince Charles Edward Stuart hid, in mid-late August, 1746.  This hill is known on maps as "Torr Ghuallain," which may actually refer to a portion of this hill, and not the entire geographic site.  Curiosly, Torr Ghuallain means “Fire Mound” and may have functioned as a warning or watch fire location for Clan Cameron in centuries past.  A fire lit in this location would be visible for a considerable distance west, along Loch Arkaig, and could have served as a beacon to rally the clan.

 

TORR A’ MOR / AN TORRADH MOR:

“The Large Burial Ground.”  A hillock located just north of the Loch Eil shoreline, east of Fassifern, where the Chief of the MacMillans resided when his clan held “thirty merklands” from about 1365 to 1429 or 1431, which was before the Camerons gained this territory.

 

TORR AN DARAICH:

A mound or hillock located south of Blaich.

 

TORR AN EASA:

(see: Torness)

 

TORR AN RATHAID / TORR AN RACHAID:

“Knoll of the Road” or “Mound of the Noise of Geese.”  A small hill, planted in fir trees (in 1875) located west of Bun Arkaig, jutting out into Loch Lochy.

 

TORR DEARG:

 

“Red Hillock.”  Located along the western shore of Loch Linnhe, south of Inverscaddle Bay.

 

TORRE CHRONE:

A stand of woods near Clunes, where Prince Charles Edward Stuart is reputed to have stayed hidden for four days in the aftermath of the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion.  One mile distant from another stand of woods, Torvuilt, where the Prince also stayed for a short period of time.

 

TORRE CLUAINE:

(see: Torr a' Chronain)

 

TORR GHUALLAIN:

(see: Torr a' Mhuilt)

 

TORR LUNNDAIDH:

(see: Torlundy)

 

TORR NA MUICE:

“Hillock of the Pig.”  Located west of Stronenaba.

 

TORRNESS:

(see: Torness)

 

TORR SONNACHAIN:

“Little Palisade Hill.”  Located northeast of Torlundy, north of the present-day Nevis Range Ski Center.

 

TORVUILT:

A stand of woods near Clunes, where Prince Charles Edward Stuart is reputed to have stayed hidden for one day in the aftermath of the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion.  One mile distant from another stand of woods, Torre Chrone, where the Prince stayed for four days.

 

TREE ISLAND:

(see: Eilean nan Craobh)

 

TRESLAIG:

(see: Trislaig)

 

TRISLAIG / TRINCHLAIG / TRESLAIG / TRINNSE-LEIG:

“Trench for Letting Out Water.”  A small scattered shore clachan / village / hamlet / crofting township located on the western shore of Loch Linnhe, one mile directly west (across the loch) from Fort William, and south of Camusnagaul.

(also see: Camus Trislaig)

 

TULAICH:

(see: Tulloch)

 

TULLICH (BATTLE OF THE PASS NEAR):

1652

 

TULLOCH / TULAICH:

“Confluence of the Lair.”  Located near Inverlair in Glen Spean.

 

 

[Back to Top]

 

 

U-V

 

 

UAMH SHOMHAIRLE:

(see: Samuel's Cave)

 

UILT GHOBLACH:

“Forked Burns.”  Two streams – each having two branches – that flow from Scour Gairich.  They unite approximately ¼ mile from Loch Quoich into which they flow.

 

UISGE CHIACHNIS:

(see: Kiachnish River)

 

UNACHAN:

(see: Aonachan)

 

UNITE/LET US UNITE:

Motto of Clan Cameron "Aonaibh Ri Chéile."

 

UPPER ACHINTORE (ACHINTORE MOR):

Located south of Fort William.  Upon the Estate of Lochiel, circa 1745, with Cameron, MacCrainge (Rankin) and MacKenzie tenants.

(see: Achintore)

 

UPPER FALLS OF NEVIS / AN STEALL:

An Steall Bhan, "White Gush."  Located in Glen Nevis.  A beautiful cascade which leaps over a rock face from a hanging valley down into the glen, from the lower cliffs of Sgurr a Mhaim.

 

UPPER GLENDESSARY:

Located approximately two miles northwest of Strathan.  Consisted of a shepherd’s house in 1875.

 

UPPER GLENFINTAIG:

Along the River Goy in Glen Gloy, east of Loch Lochy, at the foot of Glen Fintaig.

 

URQUHART:

Several Cameron families are said to have settled here during the time of the XIII or XIV Chief of Clan Cameron, during which time there was a close friendship between the Lochiels and the Chiefs of Grant.

 

URQUHART (THE RAID OF):

October 1544 and April 1545

 

VALE OF LAROCH:

(see: Ballachulish)

  

[Back to Top]

 

 

W-X

 

 

WAR CRY:

“Dà Thoabh Lochiall ‘s Dà Thaobh Lochaidh!  -  Lochiall!  Lochiall!” – “Two Sides of Loch Eil, and Two Sides of Lochy! – Lochiel!  Lochiel!”

(also see: Lochan a' Chlaidheimh)

 

WATERFALL OF THE CLAGGAN:

(see: Roaring Mill)

 

WATER OF NEVIS:

(see: Nevis – River)

 

WAUCHAN / NA H-UAMHACHAN:

“Place of the Caves.”  Located north of Torebane, near the Fionn Lighe in Glen Fionnlighe.

 

WISHING STONE:

(see: Samuel's Stone)

 

WITCH'S CAULDRON:

It is said that a witch, in the form of a cat, leapt to her death at this waterfall (Caig Falls) while a body of Camerons were in pursuit.  She had apparently been causing a plague upon their cattle.

 

WITCH OF MOY:

(see: Gormshuil)

 

WORCESTER, (THE CAMERONS OF):

The progenitor of this branch of Clan Cameron, who settled at Worcester, was John Cameron, minister of Dunoon and Kilmun.  He was in Worcester in 1566 and was a member of the general assembly in 1610.  He is said to have been a brother of Allan Mac Ian Duibh, sixteenth Chief of Clan Cameron.

 

 

[Back to Top]

 

Y-Z

 

YELLOW WATERFALL:

(see: Eas Buidhe)